Benjamin Wade
  • Member for 8 years, 7 months
  • Last seen more than 2 years ago
  • Quincy, MA
Verb to use when the light of the sun 'falls" on your skin?
5 votes

How about shone? It can be used to refer to any lit surface or lighting source

View answer
An expression for trying to futilely apply old methods that once worked
4 votes

"Fighting yesterday's war." is sometimes used to mean that you are still trying to address a new problem in an old way.

View answer
"Let A be a set, [let] B [be] a group"
2 votes

I think that "Let A be a set, let B be a group, and let C be a number." is the most formal phrasing. Since this is a mathematically formal usage, I think that would be preferred, but I don't think any ...

View answer
It looks like not funny -> does it make sense?
Accepted answer
2 votes

It would more correct to say, "It looks like it's not fun." or "It doesn't look like fun." If something is fun, that means it is something that is enjoyable or something that makes you happy. Funny is ...

View answer
May you please explain this?
2 votes

My explanation would be that when she says, "May you please pass the salt?" she is saying "Do you 'have permission' to please pass the salt?" Instead she should be saying, "Would you please pass the ...

View answer
Omnipresent is to Ubiquitous as Omnipotent is to _____?
1 votes

Before the word pluripotent was used in biology, I believe that it had a meaning similar to what you're looking for. A pluripotentate was a person with almost all the powers of a potentate (ruler), ...

View answer
"We went swimming later in the afternoon, Jack and I."
1 votes

By "old" I think you mean, "old fashioned sounding."If that is what you mean, then I think what you are "hearing" as old is the sentence structure. Putting "jack and I" at the end of the sentence is ...

View answer
What's the opposite of "bootstrap" (in business)?
1 votes

Would "Turn-key" be the word or phrase you're looking for? It describes a business where you invest your funds to purchase a business that is "ready to go." In other words, you have paid someone to ...

View answer
What does "do a take 5" mean?
1 votes

This sounds like the now required practice of taking a "time out" for safety before beginning a surgical procedure. This practice is now required in the U.S. by JCAHO. It includes making sure that ...

View answer
Is there a difference between 'reform' and 'reformation'?
1 votes

I would suggest that reform is frequently used to refer to a specific change itself, whereas reformation is more often used to denote the set of changes made. In the sentence above, "Would '...

View answer
Can "run-through" be possibly a noun?
1 votes

Just to add my two cents, it can also be used in the context of performing a practice drill, as in: "We did a run-through of the code blue response and our times were terrible."

View answer
Better word for 'believe' or 'think'
0 votes

How about, "our projection"is that.... I am also seeking a better word than "believe" to use when speaking to theists about evolution, because the next thing you know they're saying things like, "...

View answer
Word for dismissing someone's opinions as racist, liberal, etc, instead of debating back
0 votes

I realize this may not be what you are looking for, but the people whose arguments are dismissed could be considered to be victims of "political correctness."

View answer
Is there a single word for when something becomes neglected or forgotten (e.g. a plant dies because the gardener forgets to water it)?
0 votes

Put in an oubliette perhaps? An oubliette was a place where you imprisoned people who you wished to forget about. You just dropped them in and left, although in actuality they were often fed and ...

View answer
How do I politely say I have used my mouth while drinking water from a bottle?
0 votes

It's not a polite word,but "mouthed" is a single word for touching the bottle with your lips.

View answer
If we can say 'Where are you going to?', why don't we say 'Where do you live in?'?
0 votes

I'm not sure, but I think there is an implied "is it" in the phrase, so you are actually saying, "where (is it) you are going?" I also think that the terminal 'to' is incorrect, although often used.

View answer
A word to describe feeling less of an emotion
0 votes

Emotional blunting is a phrase commonly used in psychiatric/mental health circles. the phrase is emotional blunting" is used to describe someone who either doesn't show 'appropriate' levels of emotion ...

View answer
Synonym for "such as"
0 votes

What about: e.g. (exempli gratia), which means a “free example” in the sense that you're just throwing out an example of what you mean. The other possibility is: i.e., which is used to restate an ...

View answer
"How perfect is that?"
0 votes

This is a colloquial expression and is acceptable in that context, but it would be inappropriate in formal English. Similarly, you might say, "There ain't no good in him." You would be understood to ...

View answer
The urban are urbanised, the urbane are ?
0 votes

I would have to say that the tribe members could become sophisticated. That would differentiate their knowledge of the world from their acquisition of an urban environment.

View answer
"It worths it", "it worth it" or "it is worth it"?
0 votes

If you're having trouble understanding this, then look at 'worth' as 'having value.' then: It's worth a try. is equivalent to (but NOT replaceable by) It has value to try OR There is value in trying ...

View answer
What do you call this type of statement?
0 votes

Although I think paradoxical (given above) is the best answer, perhaps recursive or self-referential would also apply.

View answer
Using a word to describe that something can be detailed
0 votes

How about "specifications" That would be appropriate for details that describe how big, fast, hot, round, expensive, etc. something is.

View answer
Is there a word to describe one who brags by complaining?
0 votes

How about, 'fishing for a complement" which means to try to get someone to compliment you by either saying how badly you do something, or by interjecting a comment about your ability into a statement ...

View answer
Phrase: “Colder than a witch’s kiss!”
0 votes

I believe that the phrase, "colder than a witch's tit." originally was meant literally, based on the belief that witches (real witches who were in league with the Devil) nursed their familiars from a ...

View answer
A word for blowing air onto baby's tummy to make him (her) laugh
0 votes

My family and I have always called it "belly-busting."

View answer
Word for "of or relating to God"
0 votes

How about deistic? Pertaining to god(s)?

View answer
Word for not caring at all about anything
-2 votes

What about the word apathetic? It certainly pertains, but it doesn't really capture the importance of the fix since someone who was apathetic could be expected not to care about the fix either.

View answer