user405662
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On a scale from Optimist to Pessimist, what would be exactly in the middle?
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50 votes

Perhaps this is the word you're looking for: The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails. {William Arthur Ward} Collins defines realist ...

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A word to describe a company which other companies measure themselves by
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38 votes

Perhaps you're looking for benchmark. A standard by which something can be measured or judged Inflation ... is a great distorter of seemingly fixed economic ideas and benchmarks” (Benjamin M. ...

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"The machine must be kept operating at its *WORD* " - What is the word?
23 votes

One common word often used in such contexts that you seem to have overlooked is peak: constituting the highest or maximum level, volume, etc.; optimal; prime: a machine running at peak performance. [...

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Idiom/phrase for achieving just the tip of the iceberg
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22 votes

You could use make a dent in (something) (figurative) to make a small amount of progress with something. I have been slaving all day, and I have hardly made a dent in my work. [The Free Dictionary]

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Is there an English idiom for when you must commit to a course of action even if it turns out to be the wrong one?
21 votes

Bite the bullet If someone bites the bullet, they accept that they have to do something unpleasant but necessary. {journalism} Tour operators may be forced to bite the bullet and cut prices. [...

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Looking for a word to describe the nature at higher places
15 votes

How about alpine? of, pertaining to, on, or part of any lofty mountain. very high; elevated. growing on mountains above the limit of tree growth: alpine plants [Dictionary.com] Additionally, this ...

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"Imagine" a word for "picturing" something that doesn't involve sense of sight
13 votes

I suggest conjure . Here is how M-W defines the word— to bring to mind words that conjure pleasant images—often used with up conjure up memories

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Idiom for someone who intentionally changes your words in the way he wants?
11 votes

Put words in/into someone's mouth to suggest that someone said or meant something that he or she did not actually say or mean Don't put words in my mouth. I wasn't defending his actions, despite ...

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CABBAGE: A humble vegetable; a colorful word
10 votes

Merriam-Webster references this meaning of cabbage by providing a separate note (You cannot find it under the usual dictionary entry itself). It was through a random google search that I happened on ...

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Idiom similar to “if the shoe fits”
8 votes

Sounds more or less like A guilty conscience needs no accuser. A feeling of guilt and remorse can be so strong that it will prompt an offender to confess, even if no one is requiring them to do so. ...

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Opposite of "under the weather"?
7 votes

This is one of the many, many possible expressions— In fine fettle If you say that someone or something is in fine fettle, you mean that they are in very good health or condition. [Collins ...

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What do you call a person who keeps talking to someone even though they're clearly not interested in talking with that person?
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6 votes

Do you mean importunate? If you describe someone as importunate, you think they are annoying because they keep trying to get something from you. [formal, disapproval] His secretary shielded him from ...

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What is the origin of 'riding a gravy train' idiom?
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6 votes

Attempting an answer à la the formidable Sven Yargs, who's an inspiration! Under the entry gravy, Etymonline gives: late 14c. (early 14c. in Anglo-French), from Old French grave, graue, apparently a ...

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Phrases or idioms for rebuilding something from the ground up
6 votes

I suggest Start from scratch to begin from a point at which nothing has been done yet Nothing like this had ever been done before, so we had to start from scratch. OR Go back to the drawing board ...

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Is this just an error or am I missing something?
5 votes

I think this may be a case of a misplaced modifier. Consider the part As the farmers, all our teas... It seems to suggest that teas are the farmers. Equivalently, if you use the participle phrase ...

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synonym to acquiescently: "agree but not really want to" adverb
5 votes

I think what you are looking for is begrudgingly. Merriam-Webster defines begrudging thus: said, done, or given reluctantly : GRUDGING begrudging acceptance/admiration/respect

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What is the word or phrase to describe the action of pursing one's lips in a tight rounded shape in a happy mood?
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4 votes

Pucker to tighten skin or cloth until small folds appear or (of skin or cloth) to form small folds He puckered his lips and kissed her. [Cambridge Dictionary] Pucker is a verb for what happens when ...

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Synonyms for “passing the buck”?
4 votes

How about delegate? to give a particular job, duty, right, etc. to someone else so that they do it for you: As a boss you have to delegate (responsibilities to your staff). Authority to make ...

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A word to describe an event that brings out one’s true character
4 votes

Maybe you're looking for hour of reckoning the moment of truth : the time when something would be decided The hour of reckoning had come. [Merriam-Webster] Or perhaps litmus test If you say that ...

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An unpunished offence is bound to be repeated
4 votes

When I was still very young I often used to hear from my elders this Spare the rod and spoil the child Said to mean that if you do not punish a child when they do something wrong, they will not learn ...

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"ploughing the earth of our heart"?
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4 votes

Good question. Off the top of my head, I came up with plow. Considering how M-W defines the word, I think it would suit your purpose to a nicety— : To turn, break up, or work with a plow To make (...

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Single word for driving slowly?
4 votes

I think this one fits the bill nicely: tool to drive a vehicle, especially in a relaxed way or without any specific purpose He spent the evening tooling around the town in his new car. [Macmillan] ...

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I am searching for the adverbial form of "undefeatable" or a suitable synonym
4 votes

Try inexorably, the adverb form of inexorable, which Merriam-Webster defines as: not to be persuaded, moved, or stopped : RELENTLESS inexorable progress

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What is a word for overconsumption with the goal of getting your money's worth?
3 votes

You might consider Overkill. overkill Or this idiom go the whole hog Or perhaps this go to town {To do something to excess or in an uninhibited manner.} The kids sure went to town on those ...

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How does the grammar work behind "How [adjective] [subject] [verb] [object]"?
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3 votes

How detestable I find those insects, how pleasant the noises they make when I crush them.... The sentence as written is put together very well. But something has been omitted from it: I find (not are....

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Hitchhiker's Guide opening sentence analysis according to Verspoor and Sauter
3 votes

The usual sentence order would be: "A small unregarded yellow sun lies far out in the uncharted backwaters of the unfashionable end of the western spiral arm of the Galaxy." This version has ...

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Please explain the meaning in the context
3 votes

The quintessential English sentence John hit the ball has the syntactic constituent order "Subject + Verb + NP (Object)." This is pretty much the case with your sentence, only that it has a ...

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What is the connection between the two words "battery" and "batter"?
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3 votes

Etymonline gives battery(n.) (1530s) "action of battering," in law, "the unlawful beating of another," from French batterie, from Old French baterie "beating, thrashing, ...

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The meaning of ‘autonomous’ in this context?
3 votes

It would simplify things to know a bit more about the rather technical term Right to Truth. Wikipedia gives: Right to truth is the right, in the case of grave violations of human rights, for the ...

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Is there any idiom for repeating yourself?
3 votes

like a broken record used to say that someone keeps saying the same thing over and over again I feel like a broken record but I can't stop talking about the loss. He sounds like a broken record. [...

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