congusbongus
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Why doesn't the English language have distinct words to use when talking to elders?
64 votes

English is polite by default, it's other languages that are optionally rude. You raised the polite/rude second pronoun example; well English used to have thou in addition to you. Thou was used by ...

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What is the English equivalent to the Chinese/Japanese saying, “塞翁失馬— Life is like Old Sai’s horse”?
35 votes

Blessing in disguise This English idiom is pretty straightforward, and it fits the immediate meaning of old Sai losing his horse (although in the full story, the chain of events turns sour and sweet ...

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English word equivalent of 膩 (sick of something due to overindulgence)
17 votes

These are not exact English equivalents, but they are often what's used informally by English speakers: sick (I am sick of eating this) tired (I am tired of eating this) Also see sick and tired fed ...

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Is ‘anything in a skirt” a popular idiom? Does it have special overtones?
Accepted answer
17 votes

It's meant to emphasise the subject's promiscuity. In this form it is a replacement for "any woman" and carries no undertones with respect to women, with the possible exception of implying that ...

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Is “Ur-moment” a normal English expression?
10 votes

Ur in this case refers to the first, so Ur-moment means the first moment. This meaning stems from the German ur-, meaning proto, or original. Apart from being bit of a fancy way of saying "the first"...

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Is there a word or phrase for these specific types of memories?
Accepted answer
7 votes

Forgotten memory - memories that are technically still there as signals in your brain, but where you've lost the ability to consciously recall it. They can sometimes be retrieved with aid or certain ...

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Phrase for "suddenly wake up from a dream"
Accepted answer
5 votes

You can use snapping out of a dream, which has that sudden meaning. You can also use startle, as in startled from a dream, although this seems less sudden. People are more often disturbed suddenly ...

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Is there a word for the action of lifting the mouse to go further?
Accepted answer
4 votes

Lifting the mouse is perfectly adequate, and is used in the business to describe this exact action. For example, take this excerpt from a magazine review of a mouse: The ability to tweak lift-off ...

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Origin of "no." abbreviation in meaning of "number"?
4 votes

The "no." abbreviation of number is Latin in origin, a short form of numero. See http://latin-phrases.co.uk/abbreviations/ for other examples of Latin abbreviations.

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"Comical" v. "Comedic"
3 votes

Comedic has two definitions; one is of or relating to comedy, the other is the same as what comical means: funny. From MW: Comedic 1 : of or relating to comedy 2 : comical ...

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Abbreviation for current
Accepted answer
2 votes

cur. Just add a period to hint that it is an abbreviation. See http://www.thefreedictionary.com/cur: currency. current.

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What is an English word to mean “something that makes already strong one much stronger”?
2 votes

There is a Chinese idiom literally translated as adding wings to a tiger (如虎添翼), which also means exactly the same thing as 鬼に金棒. This may be a good phrase to use in English because people unfamiliar ...

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“waste time" and " pass time"
0 votes

Wasting time means you have better things to do, for example lounging around when you have work to do. Passing time means you are unable to spend the time on better things, and are forced to do ...

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