Adam
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Use of Apostrophes - FAQs vs FAQ's
Accepted answer
8 votes

FAQ is an acronym for Frequently Asked Questions. It's not possessive, not a contraction, doesn't have any foreign origins and is not used to indicate stress, so I write FAQs. For more information ...

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Distinction: "What can I do you for?" vs. "What can I do for you?"
5 votes

From a textual standpoint, it's an informal expression. The colloquial inversion of the more standard wording is common in various regions of the U.S., including the South and rural areas to the west. ...

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Under what circumstances is the construction "whose each" grammatical?
4 votes

It doesn't really work well in contemporary English. Whose and each are both determiners, which both expect a noun to follow. Granted, they each act like adjectives, and you can often use more than ...

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Which is correct here: "who has" or "with"?
4 votes

They're both fine. You could switch it up and use both for the sake of repetition and variation. One just uses a relative clause to describe the speaker where the other uses a prepositional phrase. ...

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Usage of "before" in "I watched the sequel before the original movie"
3 votes

Sounds fine to me. Before can be a preposition, a conjunction or an adverb. Before watching makes it a clearer case for being an adverb, whereas before the original makes it a clearer case for being ...

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What does the abbreviation "con" mean in the following context?
3 votes

It's not actually an abbreviation Look at entries for pros and cons under either pro or con in a dictionary. Where pros are the good things about someone or something, cons are the qualities that get ...

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“On the lake” vs. “in the lake”
2 votes

Definitely on the lake. If you're in the lake, you're probably swimming, sinking or otherwise submerged. Think of it like floating on top of since the emphasis of boating is staying afloat and ...

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to look into to find vs to look up?
Accepted answer
1 votes

Number 2 is better than number 1. First the syntactic: look into finding ml files rather than look into to find --This suggestion corrects the infinitive of to find with the gerund of finding, since ...

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A word or phrase for "temporarily not working"
1 votes

Try focusing on location and be vague about it, focusing on where the person is not. You can probably get more specific if you know the party you're talking to and are sure that they aren't creepy. "...

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Is there a name for spelling differences in words like _grey/gray_, _color/colour_, etc.?
1 votes

Alternate spellings or spelling variants--I prefer alternate spelling but see notes below for which is more common where. The title of this post lists some British and American variations in spelling. ...

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How can you distinguish between different meanings of the verb "to know" in English?
1 votes

Sounds like a saber vs. conocer topic (i.e., Spanish). You might try a bilingual dictionary online to meet the particulars of the language pair you are dealing with. I like the Collins Reverso ...

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General rules for identifying conditional sentences?
0 votes

Come to me, and I'll give you a fight you'll never forget. The subject of the example sentence above is you because a 2nd person command forms the conditional clause (subjects get dropped with ...

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X should have Y to Z (in the past)
0 votes

It would mean the same thing. In order to can usually be reduced to just to, and in order not to can often be substituted with to or in order to, followed by an antonym for the subsequent verb. As ...

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What’s the opposite of “singleton”?
0 votes

In the mathematical sense, I'd say a member of a set and use some quantifier to describe the size of the set. Extending that to other definitions: one of three siblings, a spouse (implying a married ...

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Does "turning down the air conditioning" make it warmer or colder?
0 votes

Turn down the thermostat or crank up the AC to make it colder. I would take the statement to mean "turn down the power to the air conditioner" and would probably opt for the fan settings first off ...

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What's the correct usage of this sentence?
0 votes

Again, both are fine from a grammatical/syntactic standpoint, and the meaning is the same. Nevertheless, I'll try to shed some light on the topic. Had you been there, you would have understood. If ...

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How to describe the various ways in which one can experience something?
0 votes

I'd go with excitement/exciting/exited or any of the spectacular choices below in italics: Part of the excitement of role-playing games comes from the chance to be cool like all the popular kids who ...

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