Anshan Today
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Is “tell advice” not idiomatic over “give advice”?
6 votes

According to English Collocations, give advice, offer advice and provide advice are the correct collocations.

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Is there a term for "non-words" like "ha", "ugh", "huh", etc?
5 votes

filler from Lexico 1.4 A word or sound filling a pause in an utterance or conversation (e.g. er, well, you know) “English speakers tend to fill pauses in our speech with ‘um’ and ‘er,’ but speakers ...

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what is a "positive" synonym for 'target'?
5 votes

from the iWeb Corpus: I was a beneficiary of his kindness.

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How should URL be pronounced?
3 votes

I have just watched 30 short videos from YouGlish: https://youglish.com/. 28 people pronounce URl as you -are -ell while 2 people pronounce it as earl.

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Correct usage of the phrase 'if any'
Accepted answer
3 votes

The corpus data show clearly that if any is usually used after a noun, sometimes after few. So the second sentence is the best choice. examples: And do you know what services , if any, they performed ...

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Is it "a grammar mistake" or "a grammatical mistake"
2 votes

According to COCA(https://www.english-corpora.org/coca/), Ngram(https://books.google.com/ngrams) and English Web 2020(https://sketchengine.eu/), both "grammar mistake" and "grammatical ...

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Combined are or combined is?
2 votes

Both are correct. If A and B are regarded as one thing, they should be followed by ' is'. If A and B are regarded as two separate things, just use 'are'. Examples are from the iWeb Corpus https://www....

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"Each other" - singular or plural in this sentence
1 votes

According to the corpora 1. English Web 2018: https://app.sketchengine.eu/ 2. UKWac Complete: https://corpora.dipintra.it/public/run.cgi/first_form 3. Google Books Ngram Viewer: https://books....

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Many more vs much more / many fewer vs much fewer
1 votes

According to Google Books Ngram Viewer, COCA, Ludwig and storywrangler, "many more people" is much more frequently used than "much more people". A search on the NOW corpus shows ...

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Is there an expression for asking two people to perform a task, but neither do it, assuming that the other will?
1 votes

Everybody’s business is nobody’s business Here ‘business’ means ‘duty’ or ‘task’. When nobody is directly responsible for doing a thing, nobody does it, because everybody thinks somebody else is or ...

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Appropriate synonym for gently reprimand
1 votes

remind: Cause (someone) to fulfil an obligation or to take note of something. with object and clause ‘the barman reminded them that singing was not permitted’ with object and infinitive ‘she reminded ...

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What is the word that is used to describe the oversimplification or non-academic discussion of a complex issue?
1 votes

Unprofessional review? Unprofessional Below or contrary to the standards expected in a particular profession. Therefore you need to get in quick while they are offering a professional service for an ...

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I have many friends,who all or all of whom are students
1 votes

Both are acceptable, but the second is much more frequently used. I enter ", who all" into COCA https://www.english-corpora.org/coca/, and it returns 248 results. 1536 example sentences with ", all of ...

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Is there a grammar mistake in "These restaurants are for people who are always in haste."?
1 votes

From the corpus COCA https://www.english-corpora.org/coca/, I get only 5 occurrences containing "be(am,is,are,were,was) in haste", but get 742 instances with "be in a hurry". So "be in haste" is ...

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Which is correct: contribute or contributes?
1 votes

Under the grammar rules, the subjunctive mood must be used in the object clause after the word ask. Ex: The Province of Nova Scotia asked that this issue be addressed in response to cases of ...

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Is there a word for when an action has an effect opposite to the one intended?
0 votes

Macmillan Dictionary: do someone​/​something a disservice​/​do a disservice to someone​/​something to do something that makes people’s opinion of someone or something not as good as it should be To ...

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Can 'nowhere' be used as a subject?
0 votes

"nowhere" can be a pronoun, meaning "no place" and it goes without saying that it may serve as a subject. https://www.lexico.com/definition/nowhere

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"Popular with" vs "Popular among"
0 votes

According to the Corpus enTenTen18, both "popular with" and "popular among" are grammatically correct and the former is more frequently used.

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"deadline by which" vs. "deadline by when"
0 votes

According to COCA,Google Books and Hyper Collocation, "deadline by which" is correct while example sentences containing "deadline by when"from the three sources are simply unavailable.

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Is resolved vs has been resolved?
0 votes

Both are interchangeable but "it is resolved" is more frequently used. Besides, "before it is resolved" is correct while "before it has been resolved" is unacceptable.

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Word or phrase for help that is really not helpful
0 votes

[lexico] disservice: a harmful action You can use the phrase "do somebody a disservice". Slater actually does viewers a disservice by being less than embarrassing here. But I would ...

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What word fits the sentence: 'it was proven with great _______'?
0 votes

If you enter "proven with great *" into Google Scholar, you will see "proven with great" collocates with success/certainty/detail.

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"He had all the money in the world; [yet/but] he was sad"
0 votes

There is no difference between the two. For example: Methuselah, the spoiling of death, is the longest liver in the world; yet he died in the year that the flood was upon the earth. These events are ...

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“Price of goods” vs “Prices of goods”
0 votes

The results yielded from the iWeb Corpus indicate that both are correct and that "goods prices" and "goods price" are also accepted but not so frequently used.

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What do I use in this instance? Suffering or suffer?
0 votes

Both are equally correct but have different meanings. The first one means that I am delighted to see that people are/were suffering. The second one means that I am delighted to see that people suffer....

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When is 'off guard' hyphenated?
0 votes

The results returned from the iWeb Corpus show that 1. "off guard" is used more frequently than "off-guard". 2. Both are mainly used predicatively, and seldom used attributively. 3. "off-guard ...

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What’s the difference between ‘such’ and ‘this’?
0 votes

The results yielded by querying the iWeb Corpus indicate that 'such issue' is always used after 'no', 'one' or 'any'. examples: Rest assured, there is no such issue with your eBay account. There had ...

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The meaning and word origin of "Christian with four aces"
-1 votes

According to reverso.net, if you say that someone holds all the aces/cards, you mean that they have all the advantages in a contest or situation.

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'It is I who is' or 'It is I who am'?
-1 votes

According to COCA https://www.english-corpora.org/coca/, "it is I who am" is correct. ! enter image description here

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What are the polite and neutral versions of “cut the bull*’?
-1 votes

From lexico: Let's get down to business.

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