Johnny
  • Member for 3 years
  • Last seen more than 2 years ago
  • Las Vegas, NV, USA
Being a persistent or persevering learner?
Accepted answer
4 votes

I'd say a diligent, or hardworking student. EDIT: I'm a US American, and learner is a funny word --- I can't tell you offhand what the rule is, but it appears in sentences like "He's a slow learner". ...

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For the linguists among us: I like loud singing vs I like singing loudly
2 votes

Oh, I think I figured it out. :-) I like singing loudly Singing is a verb, and as we know, an adverb (loudly) modifies a verb. I like loud singing Singing is a gerund (verb functioning as a noun), ...

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Which phrase sounds better( more natural and common for native speaker)." Victim of art"
2 votes

They're both fine (but odd and interesting). It really depends on style and tone. "Art victim" is punchier - it's a good name for a band. :-) "Victim of art", on the other hand, is better as a title ...

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"To be" as a state
Accepted answer
2 votes

All of your solutions are correct, and the choice will depend on what kind of tone the speaker wants to set: More formal ... or more casual? Beauty's in the eye of the beholder is something I might ...

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"is believed to still be" or "is believed to be still"
1 votes

I disagee with @RogerK - sentence #1 is best: It is believed to still be efficiently solvable. First, it's 100% correct. No problem there. Second, it avoids the "be still" combo in the other ...

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The comparison using a single "not"
1 votes

Yeah, it's a neat shortcut for saying "51% or more X". And like the other answer states, the sentence you quote is a bit tortured - it's not the clearest writing. One reason is because of the "double ...

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What is a better way of saying modest budget?
1 votes

Go for something more creative and metaphorical. All the expressions like modest budget are over-used and make people fall asleep. For example: ...create a filet mignon lifestyle on a roast beef ...

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Which of the two sentences below is more gramatically correct?
Accepted answer
1 votes

It's donning, not dawning. They're both grammatical, but the second one is too long and needs to be split up (style).

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A question about "as if"
Accepted answer
1 votes

No, it's confusing to me as a US-English native speaker. Also "makes a desk" is unclear. Like, is he a carpenter building desks? I'd expect to see something more like: David makes desks just like ...

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Which sentence sounds better?
Accepted answer
1 votes

In my opinion, they're both equal as far as correctness goes, and they seem pretty correct to me. But style-wise, I prefer the first. First of all, though, you didn't ask, but the beginning of each ...

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Code to or for the lab?
0 votes

The difference is tone and formality: in spoken American English, some people will definitely say to a friend, "Have you got the key to the storage shed?" But in my experience, at any higher level of ...

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Where should "onboard" be put in "Where is the onboard oil spill removal equipment stored?"
0 votes

Well I think the real answer is, onboard belongs back in the dictionary, and not that sentence. :-) It seems like in most cases, it's redundant. But, I have some feelings for this version: Where ...

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Fearless and priceless
0 votes

I suppose that priceless means without in the sense of, "can't put a price on it." There's also irreplaceable, one-of-a-kind, and invaluable.

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Is "Compasses" a typo?
-1 votes

Looks like it depends on the region: growing up in the United States, I had many compasses exactly like in that picture, and it was always "the compass". I've never heard of one of those called "the ...

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Can the relative word 'what' mean "the person(s) that/who"? If so, when can it and when can it not?
-1 votes

Here's the real answer: You can write/speak that way when others are doing it. Remember, English (like most languages) does not spring from an unfalteringly consistent logical core of rules. Instead, ...

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