spiceyokooko
  • Member for 9 years, 1 month
  • Last seen more than 8 years ago
  • Surrey, United Kingdom
Do footnoting superscripts go inside or outside punctuation?
31 votes

A lot depends on what style manual you follow. I follow Hart’s Rules at the University Press Oxford and according to Hart’s - Footnote references should be placed outside punctuation, but inside ...

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Can "née" be used for entities other than people?
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30 votes

It is correct usage. Née can also mean orginally called which is the way it’s being used in your example. From Oxford English Dictionary (OED) - Née Etymology: < French née, feminine of past ...

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Should words be capitalized for being religious terms?
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11 votes

Should words be capitalized for being religious terms? Not necessarily. It depends on whether they’re considered proper names. For example, church, communion, atheist, agnostic, and spirituality are ...

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What do students call their teacher in class?
10 votes

At the school I attended in England we called our teachers Sir. That may not have been mainstream and I doubt very much whether it’s in use in many schools today.

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Why does "corn" mean "maize" in American English?
8 votes

Corn is a generic term for grain. From OED –  corn, n.1 Etymology: Common Germanic: Old English corn corresponds to Old Frisian korn (East Frisian kôrn, kôren) I. gen. A grain, a seed. Whereas ...

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"justify" vs. "align" in the context of alignment
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6 votes

Align is the correct term. Think of align as a vertical invisible line running down the page. You can align the text left on that invisible line, right on that invisible line or have the text ...

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Is there a single noun in English for 'jerry-rigged?'
6 votes

From Oxford English Dictionary (OED) - Cobble, n. A clumsy mending. Cobble, v. 1 a. trans. To mend or repair roughly or clumsily; to patch up 2 a. To put together or join roughly or clumsily. ...

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How to describe students who don't study hard
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5 votes

You could use lackadaisical in the sense of not really paying attention or caring: From Oxford English Dictionary (OED): lackadaisical, adj. full of vapid feeling or sentiment; affectedly languishing....

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"Belated happy birthday" or "happy belated birthday"?
5 votes

Well belated means behind date or late. From Oxford English Dictionary: belated, adj. Detained beyond the usual time, coming or staying too late; out of date, behind date. So, if you'...

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I was able to hear the sound/noise from here?
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5 votes

It's not a question of which is correct usage, it’s more a question of what meaning you intend to imply by the choice of those two words. To use the word sound you’re implying something audible. To ...

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What is an appropriate greeting to use at night time?
4 votes

You don’t have to stick to established customs if your context doesn’t warrant it. English is a living, evolving language and it’s not static. Sometimes you have to think a little laterally to fulfill ...

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What is the difference between "clearance" and "sale"?
4 votes

Clearance is most often used (but not exclusively) when a shop wants to clear a particular stock line. In your example this would be CookiesKids. The reasons vary, but most often because they're not ...

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Use of "already" in context or alternative phrasing
4 votes

I understand your confusion. According to the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) already can mean: already, adj. and adv. Before the time in question, beforehand; by now; as early or as soon as this. ...

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One's brilliant vocabulary and a tendency to show it off
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4 votes

From Oxford English Dictionary (OED) I like: flowery, adj. Abounding in flowers of speech; full of fine words and showy expressions, florid. In use: Shakespeare Measure for Measure (1623) ...

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What is an inverse phrase for “topping-off”?
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4 votes

I would think drain would work, from OED – drain, n The act of draining or drawing off; That which is drained or drawn off;

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Is there a word to describe the virtue of "to do something and ask for nothing in return"?
4 votes

Philanthropist might be an alternative to altruism already suggested – From Oxford English Dictionary (OED) – philanthropist, n. A benefactor of humankind; one who behaves benevolently towards others;...

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Meaning of "by appointment to"
4 votes

The phrase ‘by appointment to’ as far as I'm aware only applies to Royal Warrant Holders that have supplied goods or services to the Households of HM The Queen, HRH The Duke of Edinburgh or HRH The ...

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The plural of "conch"?
4 votes

I’ve always used conches, pronounced with a hard initial c (/k/) and a soft ch (/tʃ/) at the end. But I also think that spelling it conchs and pronouncing it with with hard initial c (/k/) and hard ...

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What is the origin of the word "conk"?
3 votes

The word conk is slang for nose. From Oxford English Dictionary (OED): conk, n.1 The nose. But conked also means to punch on the nose. From OED: A punch on the nose or head. 1821 P. Egan Boxiana ...

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Can supper and dinner be used interchangeably?
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3 votes

The crux of your question appears to be: can the words supper and dinner be used interchangeably? According to established dictionary definitions, the answer would seem to be yes. From Oxford English ...

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Should there be capitalization after an equation?
Accepted answer
3 votes

No. Particularly if it's following a comma because you're not indicating the end of a sentence. If the equation ends in a full point, yes capitalise it.

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Origin of "Set on Its Ear"
3 votes

I believe the expression originates from 'out on your ear', which means being dismissed and thrown out and landing on your ear - http://idioms.yourdictionary.com/out-on-one-s-ear

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Word for non-monetary price
3 votes

I think the word you're looking for is barter. The verb that would go with it would be bartered. Eg. James bartered a scooter with John for his broken push bike.

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Word for "buying more expensive items to go with the expensive item you actually want"
2 votes

Maybe accessorize? From Oxford English Dictionary: accessorize, v To provide an outfit or garment with accessories; to make use of accessories.

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Meaning of "full of it"
2 votes

Full of it here doesn’t necessarily mean full of shit or talking rubbish. Full of it can also refer to someone who talks themselves up or try and make out they’re far more important than they ...

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How paragraph numbers are read
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2 votes

The generally accepted and correct pronunciation of 2.3.4.5.6 would be: Two point three point four point five point six. The term point comes from full point as used as a punctuation mark or full ...

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Alternative to the word reprimand?
2 votes

Reprimand is a formal term used by the judiciary. From Oxford English Dictionary (OED): reprimand, n. A sharp rebuke, reproof, or censure, esp. one given by a person or body in authority; (Brit. Law) ...

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Can you use "procure" to mean "think of"?
2 votes

It is odd to use procure in that way in modern English. According to Oxford English Dictionary (OED): procure, v. To obtain; to bring about. And it is most often used in the sense of to obtain, for ...

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How to format "and" or "&" in a three-line header or title
2 votes

Ampersands are generally used in one of two ways – in the titles of firms such as Freeman, Hardy & Willis and in dictionaries where space is limited. In all other instances and should be used.

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Is there a rule for using or not using the definite article before people’s titles?
Accepted answer
2 votes

In certain cases and contexts these are virtual proper names of persons. It should be Her Majesty The Queen. This is why you get The Prince of Wales, The Archbishop of Canterbury, The President of the ...

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