Daniel
  • Member for 4 years, 4 months
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Should I say 'in 3D' or 'on 3D'?
1 votes

The former ( in 3D) Here's a straightforward example from Longman :"a film in 3-D"

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Is it common for native speakers to put a question mark at the end of declarative sentence?
1 votes

I have to take issue with the answer above. Its not a question of affectation, its just colloquial usage. And we're not talking about declarative sentences either, it's just that the modal verb isn't ...

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Word for turning a situation around on someone
0 votes

Some phrases come to mind, which might be more or less helpful; Ostracize: to avoid someone intentionally, or to prevent someone from taking part in the activities of a group: His colleagues ...

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I need another phrase for "as expected" or "it would follow"?
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Sure enough According to Oxford: Sure enough: used to introduce a statement that confirms something previously predicted. "when X-rays were taken, sure enough, there was the needle" ; "The story ...

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Why do you say "Do you have “a” euro?" Rather than "an" Euro?
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Because "U" is here a semi- vowel/ semi - consonant. The same way "w" is a semi- vowel. When they stand at the beginning of a word, they operate as virtual consonants, so the "an" - which is only used ...

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Is it the correct length vs. has it got the correct length
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0 votes

It's definitely "is" and not " has". Someone is 6 feet tall, something is 600 cm long etc. Its' definitely a case of language interference ( what you called " mother tongue impact").

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Looking for a specific word for anger caused by someone's selfish action
0 votes

How about resentment ? (Definition: the strong and painful bitterness you feel when someone does something wrong to you)

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Is there an adjective or phrase for "to be dealt with"?
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Backlog: an accumulation of uncompleted work or matters needing to be dealt with. ("the company took on extra staff to clear the backlog of work") Expressions such as the following might also work: ...

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an idiom or expression for "not go well with/contradict something"
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The answer above is top-notch. There are however a couple of suggestions I'd like to put forward that might work in certain contexts. "Go against the grain" Cambridge: If something goes against the ...

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One word for "bringing someone up to speed"
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Break in ; teach the ropes; clue in; fill in; Examples: she's been instrumental in breaking in the new employees.

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A word for a car that always breaks down and may need to be replaced
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-2 votes

A junker. It's a junk car, on its last legs.

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