Vocoder
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"Serving test.txt at [web link]" or "Serving test.txt on [web link]"?
1 votes

Given the common use of (web) "address" as a term to describe Uniform Resource Locators (URLs) I'd suggest that the former is correct in the same way you'd say "I'm having a party at the following ...

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Do "worn out" and "worn" convey the same meaning?
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2 votes

A worn out object is an object that has been worn to the point of uselessness. For instance, the brake shoe would be worn if the lining was visibly abraded, it would be worn out if it was abraded to ...

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What does the word “repultrigue” mean?
2 votes

It's a portmanteau of "repulsion" and "intrigue". The author is awkwardly combining conflicting emotions for comic effect.

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Is there an olfactory counterpart to quiet?
0 votes

It's not elegant, but: deodorised/deodorized to rid of odor, especially of unpleasant odor. It really depends on your interpretation of the de- prefix. Does it infer an absolute removal of the odor,...

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What is the correct sentence / sentences from following four sentences?
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1 votes

Both #1 and #3 are close, with #1 being the better of the two - but you're missing a subject. You have an object - "Custom Post Types" - but nothing to act upon it. Assuming you are the subject: ...

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'summarized' and 'traveling' are not British English?
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2 votes

British English uses "-ise" or "-ised" where American English would use "-ize" or "-ized". Travelling is the correct British English spelling of "traveling" - presumably because the double "l" ...

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One-word substitute for "otherwise" in this context
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2 votes

I'm finding it difficult to come up with a direct substitute, because otherwise is very well suited to that sentence. I have some suggestions that I think are probably inferior, or convey a different ...

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What is the meaning of "engage in a delicate dance"?
5 votes

It's a metaphor that implies skill, meticulousness and balance. Possibly feet - more on that with the examples. In your first example you have a person who is providing health care to more children ...

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What would be the serious equivalent of "parody"?
1 votes

Okay, so this question is super old now, but: reimagining (gerund of reimagine) Reinterpret (an event, work of art, etc.) imaginatively. Examples: Cruel Intentions is a present-day reimagining of ...

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the plural of a 'word-as-a-word'
1 votes

You could use either "sos" or "so's" - there's a broader discussion of when it's appropriate to use an apostrophe to pluralise here. But I'd say the best way would be so avoid pluralising the word "...

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Is there a single word that means 'digital illustration'?
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1 votes

Happy to be proved wrong, but I'm not sure there's a simpler form than digital illustrations, or even digital artwork. Some nouns are just too vague without qualifying adjectives. For instance: "...

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What is the meaning of acute apathy that makes it an oxymoron?
1 votes

Personally, I don't think it's an oxymoron in the classic sense (like "freezing hot", or "whitish black") - Acute apathy is a sudden sharp, severe or intense lack of caring. Jim was always really ...

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"Keeping a distance" vs "keeping my distance."
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1 votes

Keeping my distance implicitly defines the distance as whatever you are comfortable with, because it's your distance. It sugggests that you are successfully avoiding something or someone. There's an ...

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Word for an person/actor who shares an article
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1 votes

The need to keep it generic makes this one a bit difficult, because each medium tends have its own terminology - for example, retweet if you're sharing a Twitter "article". But my best ...

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Derogatory term for people from places like San Francisco
4 votes

elite It's a step or two removed from the dictionary meaning, but I've heard it used in derogatory terms in Australian, British and US English to describe city dwellers with a left-leaning world ...

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Why is " significant other" often used humorously according to the OALD?
0 votes

From my perspective (Australian English) it's an overly formal, somewhat archaic term that might appear on a tax form or similar. Conversationally, the commonplace term is simply "partner". It's ...

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An adjective for a person who "is looking for problems"
19 votes

If it's deliberate - antagonistic (link) 1. acting in opposition; opposing, especially mutually. 2. hostile; unfriendly. or troublesome (link) causing trouble, annoyance, or difficulty;...

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Which one's correct - "this two" or "these two"?
4 votes

"These two" is correct because two is a plural, as you say. The only sensible exception I can come up with is in a very specific verbal discussion. A signwriter is having trouble deciding ...

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