Xantix
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What does 'sucker for' mean?
12 votes

The origin was discussed here origin of sucker: “young mammal before it is weaned”, late 14c., agent noun from suck. Slang meaning “person who is easily deceived” is first attested 1836, ...

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What does “Sautéed” mean in “Someone who has not sautéed in a subject”?
8 votes

This phrase is not common, and appears to just be a diversion into cooking terms to create an analogy. Sautéing is as you defined it. When you sauté olive oil, garlic, and onion together when ...

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"Really" in a negative sentence
Accepted answer
7 votes

It is ambiguous. The ambiguity comes from that fact that "really ready" is not the same thing as being plain "ready". So, if you are not "really ready" you might still be "ready". Some alternatives: ...

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Popular alternatives to "thank you"
6 votes

There are plenty of good suggestions, but I just wanted to add a couple of ideas. Since the idea of saying thank you really consists in two parts: Acknowledge that something happened that I ...

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Is “Reading strong” a popular alternative to “Read a lot more”?
5 votes

I have only seen this construction with the "-ing" form of a verb. A sentence like: I started singing yesterday, and I am still singing strong. means that even though time has passed from ...

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"Pain in the neck" and similar expressions
Accepted answer
4 votes

Found a few on google, and sorted them by least offensive. He's a headache. an eyesore. (not equivalent, but has a body part) pain in the neck. pain in the rear pain in the rear end. pain in the ...

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This book will change your wife – trope?
4 votes

I'm not sure if this has been parodied enough to quite count as a snowclone, but that's probably still what I would call it. The Snowclones Database Wikipedia article on Snowclones

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How to say "A has X, and B has X" in a single clause
3 votes

"Mike and Jane each have an apple." is unambiguous and means what you want. "Both Mike and Jane have an apple." is somewhat ambiguous. It would usually be interpreted to mean what you want. It could, ...

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Dispensing or dosing?
2 votes

Until just a few minutes ago, I was unware of the verb form to dose. A quick Google Search brought me to the Wikipedia article which explains that it is commonly used by engineers in thermal power ...

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How to read parentheses equation
2 votes

Here's how I would read the examples aloud. Commas/pauses are important to seperate the different parts. In my university experience so far, I haven't heard math teachers read aloud the start and ...

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Changing present tense to past tense
1 votes

The initial statement has a problem with it. The present "want" doesn't mesh well with the phrase "later today" specifying a future time period. The following are alternatives to ...

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"Is called" + article?
1 votes

The style depends on the context. For Song and Movie titles, or category names, use version 1 like: What's the name of this song? It's called "Autumn Leaves." What was the name of that movie with ...

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Why do people say "you could have done"?
Accepted answer
1 votes

I see two ways to interpret this grammatically. "If there is a transaction, it is possible that you have data that was saved." (thanks to ruakh) "If there is a transaction, by doing something ...

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Can last names be shortened just as first names?
1 votes

The general rule is ask someone if they mind being called "X" before you refer to them as "X". In various situtations, it may be normal to commonly refer to people principally by last name, such as ...

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Is there a term for what 'sheveled' is to 'disheveled'?
1 votes

Wikipedia calls words like this: "Unpaired Words". disgruntled - gruntled disheveled - sheveled uncouth - couth discombobulated - combobulated unkempt - kempt

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Meaning of "classes meet at their regular times"
1 votes

This is referring to different 'lessons'. However, the lessons themselves aren't meeting, so it is understood that class actually means the people that attend a given class.

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Difference between "fell to the ground" vs. "fell on the ground"
1 votes

Subjectively, I feel there is a difference between the two. Since the focus of "fell to the ground" is on the distance moved to the ground, I would expect the next sentence to focus on the damage to ...

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Ambiguity of "We discourage X from doing Y by using Z"
1 votes

I would try: Through law enforcement, religion, and education, we discourage people from committing crimes. Note: this also moves away from directly saying "we use religion" which could come off as ...

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Is there a word for preparation with a negative connotation?
1 votes

A few phrases from different contexts: He can't deviate from his script. He just doesn't come off as sincere/genuine. He's always planning something. He has an ulterior motive for everything. He's ...

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"I know that that that school that is famous because of its rules." — Can this sentence work?
0 votes

After staring at the sentence a while I can't see a good way to parse the original sentence. Actually, the sentence works if you add another "is". Q: "Hey Joe, did you know that that, um, building ...

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What is the best way to idiomatically translate this pun into English?
0 votes

First off, I liked the suggestion above about "The Chair". And this chair is the Dark Lord's, in case he wants to offer anyone The Chair. If we know about the Dark Lord's personality and habits. If ...

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Could I use "Ending projects(contests)"?
0 votes

You could try, "Projects nearing completion" or "Contests with upcoming deadlines." In some cases, "Active Projects" or "Active Contests" may work fine. edit: some more ideas. Aging projects (i.e. ...

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Is "Englishnization" an acceptable term?
-1 votes

Personally I would go with either, Englishization. Englishinization. Adding the extra vowel sound before the 'n' makes it sound better. Here's a list of words ending with 'zation', notice that most ...

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