eyeballfrog
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What noun do we have that means 'offendableness' or 'offendability' (tendency) or that means 'offendedness' (state)?
1 votes

This state could be called touchy: Tending to take offense with slight cause; oversensitive.

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Pair like man/woman but clearly for sex not gender
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1 votes

Standard usage in the English language does not distinguish these concepts. To the vast majority of people, "sex" and "gender" are synonyms, and as such there is no common convention as to whether ...

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Finding a better name for "context" or "variant" for describing a software object concept
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1 votes

I would call them setups. From Merriam-Webster: setup noun 2 A : the assembly and arrangement of the tools and apparatus required for the performance of an operation B : the preparation and ...

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Word for focusing on what you do not have?
0 votes

The phrase that came to mind was negative Nancy. A person who is considered excessively and disagreeably pessimistic. Other names beginning with N are sometimes substituted, such as Nelly or Ned.

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In 1395, why was "her" used instead of "their"?
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10 votes

In Middle English, "her" means "their". The Modern English "their" actually comes from Old Norse, while the equivalent (and predecessor) of Modern English "her" is "hire".

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Definition by analogy for "not hierarchical"
0 votes

I've found heterarchical as an opposite to hierarchical in the sense of "an organization system where elements have no single canonical order". This is a rather obscure word, though. In data ...

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General word for "imaginary bad things"?
3 votes

I would suggest "monster", "demon", or "bogeyman" depending on context If you just want to talk about the general category that includes Dracula, Xenomorphs, zombies, and such, "monster" is probably ...

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What is a single-word adjective for relating /pertaining to physical addictiveness?
2 votes

"Physically addictive" refers to substances that result in both addictive behavior and physical dependence. If that's the category you're looking for, it should work fine. If the category you're ...

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Using the word 'having' despite the fact it is a state verb
2 votes

While "have" in the sense of ownership rarely appears in the progressive aspect, it can certainly take the "-ing" ending as a gerund. Having a car is a big responsibility. But your examples aren't ...

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Comma or not in "help people discover, and grow in, faith"
1 votes

Commas are unnecessary; the real problem is that the single word "discover" and the verb phrase "grow in" don't properly parallel. It's probably best to use single-word verbs for both, such as Our ...

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Which one of these is correct?
0 votes

Assuming that the ad is talking about an email reply to it, I would phrase it as Please state the position that you are applying for in the subject [of the email]. This word order is chosen so ...

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IF: When not to use the subjunctive mood
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1 votes

Sure. You do this whenever the if statement is making statements or predictions about the current world If he goes outside, he will get wet. If it is raining today, yesterday's forecast was wrong. If ...

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"Can I add sugar in/to milk?" Which preposition is correct?
3 votes

You should use "add to" when the sentence specifies what is receiving the sugar and "add in" (or just "add") when it doesn't. Compare I have a glass of milk. Can I add sugar to it? vs I have a ...

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«[…] confirmed what observed»: is this correct English?
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0 votes

"...confirmed what was observed in the spot assay analysis." puts the relative clause in passive voice, meaning that the measurement confirmed the observations in the spot analysis. "...confirmed ...

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Milder synonyms of "honored" in the "I'm honored" sense
3 votes

"I'm touched" is a way to express appreciation for something that's a little less strong and/or formal than "I'm honored". It does have some connotation of sentimentality, though, which might not be ...

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Can passive voice exist without "to be"?
3 votes

Your third example is an active voice sentence using the intransitive verb "sink" (to move downward due to a lack of buoyancy). This has a different, though related, meaning from the transitive verb "...

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What is the subject of "What should I do?"
3 votes

"I" is the subject of the sentence. This is being confused by two factors. First, as part of general question asking-syntax, English moves an auxilliary verb to the start of the sentence (or adds "do" ...

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How should one use "not to mention"?
1 votes

The sentence in full is saying ...rodents that could damage the art, not to mention they [the rodents] could scare off visitors. Thus, we see that "scare" is correct, as it is parallel to "damage"....

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We all know the difference, but: can 'all' ever substitute for 'both?'
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4 votes

If the set has a known number of objects and that number is known to be two, you should use "both". Using "all" will sound unnatural, and it may even cause confusion (by implying you are talking about ...

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What is the most common sound for each of the vowel letters (a, e, i, o, u) of American English?
0 votes

English spelling does not always nicely correspond to sounds, so pretty much any rule about it is going to be a rule of thumb. However, in elementary school, we were taught that every vowel has two ...

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