Dominic Cronin
  • Member for 9 years, 8 months
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Is "used in anger" a Britishism for something?
12 votes

Simply put: shots "fired in anger" are distinct from those fired in practice. If we say that something has never been used in anger, we mean, by implication, that it has never seen the fullness of the ...

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Antonym of 'Cascade'
11 votes

If you want to keep it simple, then you could say that Cascading is used in the sense of "coming down from above", so perhaps you could say Ascending. Cascade can also imply something coming from ...

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What to call a patient's close relatives, friends and family members in one or two words?
7 votes

I think you could talk of someone's "immediate circle". Perhaps the first time you introduce the phrase in your document, you could say "immediate circle of family and friends" and thereafter use the ...

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What do you call a maker of wind instruments?
Accepted answer
7 votes

Good question. To be honest, I'm not sure if there is a specific word. Bagpipe players avail themselves of the services of a pipemaker; clarinet players go to a clarinet maker, trumpet players to a ...

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Does the word "newbie" have a negative connotation?
6 votes

"Newbie" probably owes much of its widespread use to Usenet, where it definitely had negative connotations. In general, yes, I'd say calling someone a Newbie would be negative. The implication is not ...

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"Implied" is to "explicit" as "implication" is to what?
5 votes

Although I agree with the notion that were there a need for such a word, one would exist, I couldn't resist the attempt. So if an implication is something which has been implied, and therefore not ...

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Common phrases for something that appears good but is actually bad
5 votes

I kind of hope that the questioner will edit the question to reflect the many possible answers, so here's my contribution: a phrase popular in the North-East of England: All fur coat, and no ...

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Why there are two different meanings for "triweekly"?
4 votes

The only clear way to say it is "every three weeks" (or something similar). If you use words like triweekly, you will just confuse everyone. Even if their interpretation of the word is correct, they ...

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Why pronunciation of "Crooked" is "Crook-ked"?
Accepted answer
4 votes

Perhaps because of the well-known nursery rhyme. There was a crook-ed man, and he walked a crook-ed mile He found a crook-ed sixpence, on a crook-ed style ... and so forth. The metre of the ...

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Pronunciation of "Einstein"
4 votes

The pronunciation with s is simply the most widespread anglicisation of the name. It was common for immigrants to the US to anglicise their names, perhaps in order to fit in better. I'm not sure ...

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Which is more accurate: "The president signed the bill..." or "The president signed the law..."?
4 votes

If he signed a bill, the first is more accurate, if he signed a law, the latter. The details of what presidents do with regard to bills and laws in their respective countries fall more into the ...

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Dinky cars (toy cars)
4 votes

I grew up in the UK (b. 1961). We had Dinky cars. We also had Matchbox cars, which were slightly smaller. Dinky cars later became quite collectable, but for that, they'd need to be pretty much un-...

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What does "insteadly" mean?
Accepted answer
4 votes

It's not an English word. I don't think it's a mistake either, though. It's more likely to be a jocose usage.

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How to describe someone who speaks a language "as if it is his mother tongue" in a CV?
4 votes

The easiest way to get this across is to say that you are fully bilingual in Hebrew and English. Generally, to say that you are a native English speaker or that your mother tongue is Hebrew carry ...

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How to degender "separate the men from the boys"?
3 votes

There is no need to "degender" the expression. The implication is that men, being what boys grow up into, have more experience than the boys and that the knowledge and toughness that this experience ...

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"Out of the box" — when should I use this phrase?
2 votes

"Out of the box" has both meanings. To think out of the box (or outside the box) is to solve a problem by tackling it from a different perspective. This refers to the nine dots puzzle. Rather ...

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Was your fender "stove-in" after your car was hit by that truck?
2 votes

I'd say it was "stoved in", but then I'm English

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What's the double hyphen after greetings in emails?
2 votes

I don't know why someone would put a double hyphen after the recipient's name in an email, but the Internet has long-standing tradition of the "sigdash". In early email and news software, the ...

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Is calling someone "old school"- offensive/derogatory?
1 votes

The term "Old School" is positive. Describing someone this way implies that they haven't suffered from the same degeneration as the rest of society; that they still have the values of an earlier ...

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What's the proper word for a person waiting in a queue?
1 votes

In normal speech it’s quite common to simply refer to “the people in the queue”.

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Can "myself" stand for both "me" and "I" in "my mother and I/me"?
1 votes

I don't think you can say My mother and myself were standing on the bus stop. I think you can infer from that that myself only works as an object pronoun. Of course, all it takes is a good counter-...

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Do you say "please yourself" in a non-sexual context?
1 votes

Yes - English speakers use the phrase "please yourself" in non-sexual contexts. There may be sexual interpretations, but the phrase on its own would not usually mean that unless there were other hints ...

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Idiom that means trying to save something that is beyond saving
0 votes

If you want to say "beyond saving", then say just that. It's a perfectly good way to express your meaning. As others have noted, your missing blank can perhaps be filled with pointless or futile.

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Is there an abstract word for the environment in which a vehicle can move?
0 votes

I know this is wrong, but my brain dredged up "substrate"

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"student list" vs "students list"?
0 votes

Maybe this is a difference between US and UK English - and maybe not, but as a Brit, I'd incline towards "student list". After all, the plural is implied by "list" isn't it?

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Specific verb for "training an apprentice"?
0 votes

I don't think there is a specific word for this. Why would you need one? "Train" is fine. You just need to say "He trained his apprentice in...", and the entire meaning is conveyed. Training is just ...

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keeping maiden name after marriage
0 votes

I'd suggest that Ms doesn't work at all as a form of address and is perhaps clumsy even in written English. If it's inappropriate to give either a married or unmarried title, then the name alone will ...

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Friendlier way to express you paid for a person's drink/dinner and expect it to be paid back
0 votes

If I went for dinner with a friend, and decided that "going Dutch" was awkward, I might say "I'll get this", and perhaps jokingly or to disarm any protests: "You can get it next time" or "You can get ...

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Phrase for observing a rule in a malicious way
0 votes

The phrase that springs to mind is "dumb insolence". It's not an exact fit for what you describe but it comes close in some respects. I suspect that in the strict sense of military discipline, this is ...

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Difference between "slacks", "pants", and "trousers"?
0 votes

In UK English, Slacks are trousers worn by women. This is by contrast with the other form of similar leg covering garment worn by women: tights. Trousers usually implies that the wearer is male. In ...

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