Bill Lefurgy
  • Member for 9 years, 9 months
  • Last seen more than 9 years ago
What is the Tacoma Narrows bridge doing in this picture?
17 votes

I'd say buckled, which fits the Dictionary.com definition: "3. to bend, warp, bulge, or collapse: The bridge buckled in the storm." There may be a technical engineering term, but I suspect most ...

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What's the meaning of "real gone"
Accepted answer
12 votes

The term generally means something like absent from normal concerns or behavior in a way that's cool or outrageous in a hip way. The Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions defines ...

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"Man" is to "womanizer" as "woman" is to what?
10 votes

Wanton is probably the closest term. Dictionary.com define the word as "a lascivious person, especially a woman." There's a good discussion on "What is the female equivalent of 'philanderer'? on ...

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Alternative to saying "Long pole in the tent"
7 votes

Merriam Webster defines the phrase as: "The most important issue or problem that prevents or slows progress, especially on a project. The factor that must be addressed before all others or that has ...

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Simple present vs. present continuous
7 votes

There is a subtle difference. To my ear "Are you still working there?" is the more aggressive and challenging form, as in "Jeez, why are you staying at that crappy job?" "Do you still work there?" ...

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Meaning and usage of "to no end"
6 votes

The OED discusses no end in the context of end, which is noted as of Old English/Saxon origins to mean 1a. "the extremity or outermost part (in any direction) of a portion of space, or of anything ...

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"Steamroller" to describe a person as very determined
Accepted answer
6 votes

"Like a steamroller" is acceptable usage for describing a person. Dictionary.com (Collins) cites one meaning of steamroller as "an overpowering force or a person with such force that overcomes all ...

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What's the difference between cunning, crafty and wily?
5 votes

Webster's Dictionary of Synonyms says all the terms (along with sly, tricky, foxy, insidious, guileful and artful) are comparable when they mean having or showing a disposition to attain one's ends by ...

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Happiness + bewilderment =?
4 votes

Agog might fit the bill. Thesaurus.com shows it as a synonym for bewildered, ardent, eager, enthusiastic and breathless. It’s used in the manner you seek in several examples. In From This Far ...

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Is "received with thanks" stilted English?
Accepted answer
4 votes

Dictionary.com defines stilted as "stiffly dignified or formal, as speech or literary style; pompous." Named synonyms include terms like artificial, affected and forced, which imply something ...

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Is the acronym PIGS (or PIIGS) offensive?
4 votes

The Financial Times and Barclays Capital determined they wouldn't use the acronym PIIGS (and would instead spell out the countries it represents) in 2005 because "it can be construed as having ...

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What is a term for describing words that sound similar in a pleasing manner when used together?
4 votes

The right term in this context is assonance, which according to Merriam-Webster means "relatively close juxtaposition of similar sounds especially of vowels; repetition of vowels without repetition ...

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What does "the reactor core inventory" mean?
3 votes

This phrase is best described as euphemistic technical jargon. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission defines reactor core to mean "the central portion of a nuclear reactor, which contains the fuel ...

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connotations of the word 'demure'
3 votes

Demure used on its own doesn't necessarily imply submissive. Dictionary.com fails to list submissive as a direct synonym, although it does cite words such as timid, unassertive and constrained. ...

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Student:Classmate::Teacher:____________?
2 votes

I would say faculty mate (sometimes hyphenated or closed) fits. Here's an example from a biography of a former president of Drew University, John F. Hurst, who earlier worked at "Hedding Literary ...

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Figurative expression for outrageous/unlikely/overly bold claim
2 votes

I favor "perish the thought." It has a close idiomatic structure and meaning to "god forbid."

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Can "crepuscular" and/or "twilight" apply to morning half-light as well as in the evening
2 votes

There are some interesting terms that have relevance here. One is matutinal, which Wordnik defines as "of, relating to, or occurring in the morning; early." Wikipedia is more specific: "a term used ...

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What is the difference between 'inclination' and its varieties?
2 votes

According to "Webster's New Dictionary of Synonyms," the named words have different nuances of meaning. It comes down to the difference between being influenced to do something versus a natural urge ...

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Swearing: “bollixed”
2 votes

Despite the fact that both words have the same origins, they are not the same, at least in American usage. Wikipedia draws a distinction between bollocks and bollix and states that "To 'bollix things ...

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Single term for "upload or download"?
2 votes

Two possible terms: 1) bidirectional data transfer and 2) full duplex data transfer. Here's a good discussion in relation to USB 3.0.

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A word to describe feeling less of an emotion
1 votes

Dissipated works for this purpose. Merriam-Webster defines the word to mean "to cause to spread thin or scatter and gradually vanish." It's often used in reference to feelings and also to the loss ...

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Term, blend-word, or metaphor for being social but with boundaries
1 votes

Polite, "Showing good manners toward others, as in behavior, speech, etc.; courteous; civil: a polite reply;" or perhaps cordial, "courteous and gracious; friendly; warm: a cordial reception."

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Where did "cc" and "bcc" come from?
1 votes

Carbon copy is correct. The OED defines c.c. as "carbon copy or copies (followed by a list of others to whom correspondence is to be copied)." The earliest citation listed is this: "1936 L. I. ...

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What is an overall term for a service that publishes digital publications?
1 votes

Digital publishing platform fits, as in this sentence in a trade publication: "The launch of Apple's digital publishing platform iOS5 Newsstand signals a new focus and support for publishers taking ...

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"Deuce and a half" for body weight
1 votes

In this context "deuce and a half" has nothing to do with the military truck. It is instead slang for a large person in the neighborhood of 250 pounds. Urban Dictionary defines the term as "a woman ...

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Difference between “robot”, “machine”, and “automaton”
0 votes

I'm assuming the context here relates to existing mechanical devices as opposed to science fiction. Machine is the most general of the terms and fits what the OP says. The OED defines machine as: "...

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Word for making a sound out of the side of your mouth
0 votes

If the request relates generally to the making some kind of imitative sound then mouth sound effect might be the best and most obvious choice here. The clip shows a character imitating a vampire hiss (...

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What word/expression describes allowing another to save face rather than to be disgraced publicly?
0 votes

Wikipedia cites "influential Chinese authors" on the subject of face. One, Lin Yutang, is quoted on the practice of granting: "grant face; give (someone) a chance to regain lost honor." A guide for ...

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