Cameron
  • Member for 9 years, 9 months
  • Last seen more than 8 years ago
"Scheduled on" vs "scheduled for"
Accepted answer
52 votes

The version with on looks a little wrong to me. I would use on if I were describing the time at which the schedule was set, giving something like: My interview was scheduled on the 26th of June for ...

View answer
How are 'marry', 'merry', and 'Mary' pronounced differently?
38 votes

Interestingly, this question appeared as number 15 on the Harvard Dialect Survey, so it is possible to give a good summary of the pronunciation differences in these three words as they are spoken in ...

View answer
Difference between nevertheless and nonetheless
Accepted answer
37 votes

The regular MW dictionary entry for nonetheless actually just says "nevertheless," and I'm not personally familiar with a situation when you could justifiably use one but not the other. According to ...

View answer
Idiom/phrase which means "to pretend not to understand or know"
Accepted answer
31 votes

I'm not sure of any colorful idioms that could be English counterparts to what you mentioned. If someone behaved that way, I would probably say that she was: playing dumb feigning ignorance being ...

View answer
Meaning of "Be Mr Late Better Than Late Mr"
Accepted answer
22 votes

It is a road sign that is meant to implore drivers to slow down. In this case, being "Mr. Late" means that you are habitually late. In other words, you are late so often that it may as well be your ...

View answer
What is an appropriate word for a "rerise"?
17 votes

How about resurrection? From the OED: …3. Revival or revitalization, esp. of a person who or thing which has fallen into inactivity, disuse, or obscurity; an instance of this. Another similar ...

View answer
Why do some people pedantically cling to dying word forms (e.g. die, oxen)?
17 votes

You're clearly begging the question (to pedantically use a dying word form) by assuming the conclusion that people who use a form that you find uncommon are doing it pedantically. For the record, roll ...

View answer
Is there a word that means "not yet open"?
Accepted answer
15 votes

The most direct choice that comes to my mind is unopened: Adj. 1. unopened - not yet opened or unsealed …which also has the advantage of being 8 characters long. Other terms that might work ...

View answer
Is there a word to describe a phrase such as "it is what it is"
15 votes

You might describe the phrase as a tautology (of the logical variety, not to be confused with a rhetorical tautology). With this phrase in particular, since its function is to remind the speaker or ...

View answer
Source of "-bie" in "freebie"
Accepted answer
13 votes

The slang word freebie is an example of a rhyming reduplication, which is the term for a word that repeats (possibly with modification) a part of the word stem at another place in the word. English ...

View answer
bear trap memory
13 votes

I'm much more familiar with a similar phrase: She has a mind like a steel trap. Which means that, in addition to having a strong memory (that grabs onto facts and never lets them go), also ...

View answer
"Henceforth" vs. "hereinafter"
Accepted answer
13 votes

They are both suitable, but the difference between them is that hereinafter (sometimes written as two words, herein after) usually pertains just to writing within a document, While henceforth is more ...

View answer
Do we need to repeat "no" to represent without for a list of items?
Accepted answer
12 votes

I think it depends on your choice of conjunction at the end of the list. If you use or, then you don't need to repeat the negation: This book comes with no page numbers, footnotes, or cover. …...

View answer
Looking for a suffix that is opposite of "-prone", but softer than "-proof"
Accepted answer
12 votes

How about just crash-resistant?

View answer
Is "If it had been for you" grammatical?
11 votes

Yes, it is grammatical. The context in which the sentence appears is helpful: Farewell, my dear friend; I received a letter from M. de la Mertiniere lately, inclosing a few lines from you; pray ...

View answer
Word or phrase for making something seem better by comparison
Accepted answer
11 votes

The name for something that is used to make something else look different by comparison is a foil: foil, noun. Anything that serves by contrast of colour or quality to adorn another thing or set it ...

View answer
"Man" is to "womanizer" as "woman" is to what?
10 votes

One that comes to mind is man-chaser. Another common slang term with a similar meaning is boy-crazy, though it doesn't have the same sexual connotation. A natural follow-up question is, "why is there ...

View answer
"Ann's friends and herself" -- is this correct?
10 votes

Separating the reflexive/intensive pronoun from its antecedent in that way sounds strange. The usual way you would phrase the sentence is: Ann and her friends were really nice to us. or, if you ...

View answer
Pronunciation of 'host' in Shakespeare's time
9 votes

Shakespeare's Pronunciation: Shakespeare phonology with a rime-index to the poems as a pronouncing vocabulary is a rather old book (from 1906) available from google books that talks about just these ...

View answer
What is the time average American male spends ‘on hold’?
Accepted answer
9 votes

On hold is the expression that we use for waiting on the phone. For example, if you call an office building or a customer support service, they may place you on hold until they have someone available ...

View answer
"Lessen, poisoned gulls, ditcher wander hair annulled furry tell a boarder Slipping Booty?"
Accepted answer
9 votes

For a little more context, the preamble to that story in the article you linked says: [Edit: I took this long block out since it was included in cornbread ninja's answer as well.] The first line: ...

View answer
Difference between "fee" and "fees"
9 votes

The verb and noun should agree in number, so "What is the course fee?" and "What are the course fees?" are the options. In most cases, either expression may be used. It is normal at a golf course, for ...

View answer
What does "morning wet" refer to?
Accepted answer
9 votes

As jwpat7 explained quite well, it refers to a drink of alcohol. The OED's earliest reference for wet as a noun with the meaning A drink or draught of some alcoholic beverage; a glass of liquor. ...

View answer
Word to describe "when someone describes something in too much detail"
Accepted answer
8 votes

It could be expatiate: from the OED: To speak or write at some length; to enlarge; to be copious in description or discussion. from Merriam-Webster: to speak or write at length or in detail

View answer
What is an 'Iron Ring Event'
Accepted answer
8 votes

It probably refers to the collapse of the Quebec Bridge: In 1922, Canadian Herbert Haultain created a ceremony for new engineers. New engineers are asked to recite an Obligation to their ...

View answer
Lexical class of "walking" in this sentence
8 votes

In this case, walking is an adjective. From MW: walking: adj. 2a: used for or in walking <walking shoes>

View answer
How to express your supporting someone's decision no matter what?
8 votes

How about: I support you unconditionally.

View answer
"Cannot help but think" vs. "cannot but think" vs. "cannot help thinking"
Accepted answer
8 votes

I would imagine that whoever told you that (1) is not correct did so based on a prescriptive rule against double negatives. The advice is mirrored here on a list of common grammatical errors in ...

View answer
You, the employer, "contribute the most" or "contributes the most"?
8 votes

The part of the sentence offset by commas (the employer) is called an appositive. It gives information about the word "you", but does not take its place as the subject. The word "you" is still the one ...

View answer
Is there a short term for "without a date of expiry"?
Accepted answer
8 votes

I would simply use the term non-expiring. For example, in Washington state, one can obtain a non-expiring license for child care. You may also encounter the phrase valid in perpetuity, e.g. Hawaii ...

View answer