nigel222
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Word for an event that will likely never happen again
8 votes

Two other suggestions. First, there is the latin phrase sui generis meaning the same as "singular" or "one-off" (see other answers). For the most extreme degree of unlikelyhood short of actual ...

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A word for delight at someone else's failure?
7 votes

Stick with delight if you just want to fill the blank. No matter how I tried, I couldn't complete the seemingly simple task. So feeling like an idiot I gave up and asked the expert. But to my delight ...

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Someone whose aspirations exceed abilities or means
5 votes

Wannabe (mild slang/ informal) might fit a person aspiring to enter some other social group. There's a strong implication by the person using the term that he does not think the aspirant will ever ...

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Should the article "the" be used twice with a proper noun starting with "the"?
3 votes

In speech, you'll never add an extra article and might even elide the one in the proper name. "Where's the Who CD?" and even "Where's that Who CD?", "Where's my Who CD?". In writing, with quotes (or ...

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How to positively describe somebody who misled you by accident
2 votes

I'd say that the framing of the question is, er, misleading. "A: Oh no, I misled you!". A is feeling guilty or insecure, and needs some reassurance. Implictly, A knows that they did mislead ...

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“These days are over” vs. “those days are over”
Accepted answer
2 votes

These days will soon be over (a future ending) is when you'd use these. You are still living through the days, but not for much longer. They will then become those days, separated from you by a ...

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Sleepy tired vs physically tired
1 votes

I need to sit down [ for a bit] conveys physical exhaustion. Likewise, I need a nap ( or, I need to lie down ) conveys sleepy-tired, or mental exhaustion. There's no sharp demarcation in most common ...

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Is there a word/short phrase for "the most" of something (not necessarily the majority)?
0 votes

The best part or the better part (of the vote) Best vaguely implies a majority without stating so. It would certainly imply winning an election. Better perhaps implies not a majority but better than ...

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Why are they 'nude photos'?
0 votes

Testing this out against my native speaker's understanding, I think there is a general pattern here. It may be relatively new, but I can't remember any time when I would not have understood it or ...

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What's an eponymous adjective that is an antonym of Machiavellian?
0 votes

I don't think there's an antonym to Machiavellian, but the question is to fill the gap in Alex, on the other hand, displays __________ intention, honesty and candor in leadership Possibilities ...

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Is there an idiom for "People very quickly get used to good things"
-1 votes

In the UK (and probably not elsewhere) there is a set of constructs built around "When I was young ...". Straightforward (non-jokey) usage might be "When I was young, I'd have put on a pullover rather ...

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