Terah
  • Member for 5 years, 10 months
  • Last seen more than 5 years ago
  • Limburg, The Netherlands
How can I say "bon appétit" or "smakelijk" in english?
Accepted answer
19 votes

In English, I've heard 'bon appétit' (not 'bon a petit' by the way, which translates into something like 'a good little') be used in English as well. In English, an equivalent expression would be '...

View answer
Can a room "don" posters?
6 votes

Merriam-Webster shows 'don' to be used with clothes only. 'Adorned' can be used, but it has a somewhat more specific meaning as can be seen in this definition (again from M-W): "to enhance the ...

View answer
Is there a word that can be used to refer to a collection of "donations" or "payments"?
6 votes

To me, 'campaign' suggests something that has a limited life, like a run for president, a kickstarter project, etc - basically anything that at one point stops collecting funds (making funding in this ...

View answer
Can I say "help myself to" when I'm being offered something?
Accepted answer
5 votes

In the situation you sketch, it is often about finding a good balance between formal/informal, eagerness/disinterest, especially when there is a business relationship between you and the other person. ...

View answer
Is "painstakingly slow" correct when used to mean "painfully slow"?
4 votes

As you already discovered, 'painfully' and 'painstakingly' have two entirely different meanings. 'Painfully' in this context however almost never means 'causing pain', but rather describes a mental ...

View answer
How is the word "nay" used in this sentence?
4 votes

'Nay' is old English for 'no' and 'moreover'. The writer is correcting himself in this narrative. Often, such a correction paves the way for a more accurate expression of his or her thoughts. Has ...

View answer
How do you say : The root or origin of a problem
Accepted answer
3 votes

You pretty much answered your question wíth the question :). In business, 'root cause' (and its related 'root cause analysis') pertains to 'how did an issue came to be' (and the process of 'finding ...

View answer
Using "who" twice, why?
2 votes

The phrase as quoted is natural and common amongst non-native speakers as well, and many other languages use a similar kind of 'referal system'. In this sentence, it just happens to be 'who' (as an ...

View answer
How do you categorize groups of people as subjects?
2 votes

At first I thought that you were looking for 'demographic' (which means basically the same as 'audience' in this context), but this doesn't cover the the 'articles about students or about employees or ...

View answer
Usage of "got" as a subsitute of "taking care of"?
Accepted answer
2 votes

The first example is somewhat ambiguous and the meaning of 'I got you' depends on context: on the one hand it can mean 'in the absence of your boyfriend, I got you covered' or 'I got your back', as in ...

View answer
What is the equivalent word of villainy for victim
2 votes

I believe the word you are looking for is victimisation. The relationship between the words can also be observed in the title of a BookRags article called "Does Shakespeare present the character of '...

View answer
What do you call the signal at a crosswalk?
2 votes

By all rights, it is a traffic light. One can say pedestrian traffic light if there's a need to differentiate, though this is moving farther away from the one-word search. Going on the information on ...

View answer
managing difficulties but not simplicities?
2 votes

I'm not sure if my answer that there is no definitive answer should be an answer or a comment, but there goes: I don't think there is one word to describe the behaviours in your example because of ...

View answer
What's a simpler word for "several" in the meaning of "multiple"
2 votes

Using user162286's answer as inspiration, 'a number' could also serve to indicate 'more than one' without committing to a fixed amount and without setting expectations as to how many there actually ...

View answer
How do I replace the phrase "As of when..."?
1 votes

Considering the various comments above, it is a bit of a guess as to what exactly you want to say, but given your clarification, I think enough context was given to provide you with an answer. For ...

View answer
Are these rhetorical questions?
Accepted answer
1 votes

Whether or not a question is rethorical depends entirely on context. To use your examples: Q: Little Suzy, did you take the last piece of cake? Did you see her take the last piece of the plate ...

View answer
"Frequent absence" versus "frequent absences"
Accepted answer
1 votes

The most appropriate word for use in the example sentence is 'absenteeism', although I would argue that, considering the meaning of 'absenteeism', 'absence' would not be inherently wrong (with the ...

View answer
Rules on hyphenating phrases
Accepted answer
1 votes

Compound constructions are oftend used/created when there is chance of ambiguity, in a way similar to how 'Let's eat grandpa' is put into its proper context by adding a comma between 'eat' and '...

View answer
count on me / count me on
1 votes

Yes, there is a difference between the two. The first one, 'count on me', means that you are committing yourself to a cause, for example: "Can you go to the store and get some milk?" -> "You can ...

View answer
I obligate or I am obligate?
1 votes

Referencing Grammarist, combined with my own experiences concerning 'I'm obliged', I would say that in the OP's examples, 'obligated' is the most correct (and presumably most common) word to use, as ...

View answer
Reimplement or re-implement?
1 votes

As a native Dutch speaker, this is one of those things that always require me to think before I type because I never seem to remember the exact rules. This website deals specifically with the ...

View answer
origin and first use of the word "comforter" when used to describe something worn around the neck?
1 votes

On the origin of "comforter": In Dutch, a 'komfoor' was used to keep things warm (foodstuffs, blacksmithing tools, heater, etc). With a lot of words in the English language originating from mainland ...

View answer
English equivalent for "easily blaming the person you dislike"
1 votes

There are a number of possible expressions that can be used, however, keep in mind that not every culture has a local version of every expression used in other cultures. For example, your malayalam/...

View answer
Is there a word for someone who is their own villain?
0 votes

Though being a hero or villain has little to do with it, one word that comes to mind is 'flaggelant'. Keep in mind that this word not only describes the act of self-punishment, but also describes the '...

View answer
The a/an/the article issue in different contextes
0 votes

In short - nope, you can't leave out the 'a' in case No. 2, unless you are talking about multiple houses, e.g., "You've got beautiful houses." I think this link will explain the articles 'a' and 'an' ...

View answer
Structure question
Accepted answer
-1 votes

Not sure if this helps, but with your quoted sentence making perfect sense, I'm not sure what exactly your question is: 'they succeeded,' -> well, they became successful at something 'becoming ...

View answer