Neeku
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Proper term for knowing four or more languages?
30 votes

Multilingual: A multilingual person, in a broad definition, is one who can communicate in more than one language, be it actively (through speaking, writing, or signing) or passively (through ...

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Is there a word for someone who you've not physically met but know well?
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30 votes

Before the Internet was born, people used to communicate with other people in other places by writing physical letters, mainly for exchanging languages, but also for other purposes, like sharing ...

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What is the opposite of an epiphany?
27 votes

Disillusion (v.): to make someone realize that something which they thought was true or good is not really true or good: I hate to disillusion you, but I don't think she's coming back. ...

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Difference between “purpose”, “aim”, “target”, “goal”, “objective”, and “ambition”
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22 votes

These words are pretty similar and have only subtle differences and in spoken language many people might not be careful enough to use each of the words correctly. However I think the explanation from ...

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What is the antonym of "to get used to"?
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9 votes

"Wean" seems to be the closest word to what you're looking for: wean somebody off/from something (phrasal verb): to make someone gradually stop doing something you disapprove of: advice on ...

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Is "thank's" an alternative correct spelling?
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9 votes

's shows either possession, or when the following word i.g. is/us/... is abbreviated. Therefore, in this case, 's can only be used if you're talking about something that belongs to "thank", which ...

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English proverb or saying on "you can't have too many friends"
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8 votes

The first one that comes to my mind from my English classes years ago, is: Make new friends, but keep the old; one is silver, the other is gold. I also found this youtube video which is ...

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"as well" instead of "and"
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7 votes

As well has a different meaning from and. As well is used mostly in spoken English. In written English, people usually prefer to use also: Parents are also welcome. And apart from that, as ...

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What should I say if I am not drunk but I feel that my head is heavy?
7 votes

Light-headed: Unable to think clearly or move steadily, for example during a fever or after drinking alcohol. Synonym: dizzy. e.g. The sun and the wine had made him a little light-headed. ... say ...

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Clothing Nomenclature between US and UK
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4 votes

A Waistcoat is worn in the UK as a piece of clothing without sleeves and with buttons down the front that you wear as a part of a suit. This piece of clothing is called a vest in the US which is ...

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Difference between "ditch", "trench" and "gutter"
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4 votes

Based on what Wikipedia and LDOCE suggest, the difference isn't between the American and British English (apart from the little bit of background on ditch). It's just the subtle difference in the type ...

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Is "vector" countable?
3 votes

To tell weather or not a noun is countable, you refer to a dictionary. Here's what LDOCE says: vec‧tor [countable] technical a quantity such as force that has a direction as well as size ...

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Is "What does the comments say" grammatical?
3 votes

If you really want to ask the question that way, you must say: What does the comments module/section say?

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What is the opposite of interorganization?
3 votes

inter- means between or involving two or more different things, places, people, etc. The antonym prefix for it is intra- which means inside, into, within: intra-departmental: within a department.

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how much vegetables or how many vegetables?
3 votes

From Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English: Grammar Vegetable is a countable noun, not an uncountable noun: They grew their own vegetables (NOT their own vegetable). Using the word in ...

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Word for "person living with in-laws" or "feeling awkward and inadequate"
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2 votes

live-in son-in-law is one alternative. LDOCE as an instance among the other dictionaries has this entry: live-in lover/boyfriend etc someone who lives with their sexual partner but is not ...

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Use of Comma with Clauses
2 votes

This is what I and another person who's a native speaker think: The former is the correct alternative. If it was a longer sentence, you'd probably have to add a comma after prevent, but in this case ...

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Exploration "on" or "of"
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2 votes

I believe you could easily find the answer to this question by refering to a dictionary. LDOCE says: exploration noun the act of travelling through a place in order to find out about it or ...

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What does this quote about "pasty-skinned programmers" mean?
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2 votes

Not sure if this should be posted as an answer, considering the comments above. However, as we may all know, programmers usually spend most of their time seated in a room at a desk, thinking and ...

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What is a word that describes someone who hurts people without meaning to?
2 votes

You could you "clumsy" for hurting physically, and "tactless" for hurting emotionally. See the following from subscription-only LDOCE: tactless (adj.): someone who is tactless says or does things ...

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Saxon genitive to identify algorithms, methods, techniques, theorems,
2 votes

I think apostrophe+s is always preferred. I tried googling and checking various algorithms in Wikipedia, and most of them use the saxon genitive, because they simply belong to the person. Even the ...

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“An hilarious” vs. “a hilarious”
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2 votes

Based on LDOCE, the pronunciation of the word is: /hı'leəriəs -'ler-/ and that /h/ is actually pronounced, and is NOT silent like the h in the word "hour". So you must use the indefinite article a, ...

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Grammar: French conditionnel in English?
2 votes

"Could" is a modal verb in English that has various meanings in various sentences. This is more of a grammar for usages of modal verbs that you could have found by searching, but anyhow, I always find ...

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Do we hang up a telephone call, or just "hang up"?
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2 votes

From LDOCE: hang up phrasal verb to finish a telephone conversation: I said goodbye and hung up. hang something ↔ up to hang clothes on a hook etc: She took her coat off and hung it up. As you can ...

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Show we care or show that we care
2 votes

From Subscription-only LDOCE: That is often left out when it is the object of the verb in the relative clause: They have not kept the promises they made (=that they made). That can only ...

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Should I use "still" or "yet" in the following sentence?
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2 votes

From Subscrioption-Only LDOCE: Yet is used to say that something has not happened or a situation has not started to exist, or to ask if something has happened: It isn't time to go yet. ...

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Single-word adjective for "which should be repaired"
2 votes

"To be" would make the form of the adjective that you want; in this case "To be repaired" or for a shorter one, "To be fixed", but as far as I know, English doesn't have that kind of structure to ...

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”We're looking forward to helping you find X” vs “We look forward to help you find X” etc
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2 votes

Based on English grammar, after looking forward to, you're supposed to use the verb with -ing, so all the items from that list will be crossed off except #2 and #5; that are both the same as far as I ...

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Changing the focus of this sentence?
1 votes

You can rephrase it this way: Wonderful photos taken by Chalet Augustine guests, Mike and Anne. Their children look great in their ski suits! or something like this: Wonderful photos of our ...

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What does "stick a bulls-eye on your back" mean?
1 votes

Here's the transcription of the movie. A bullseye is the center of a target in sports such as archery, shooting, and darts. Reference Those two sentences are from two different people. Based on the ...

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