Michael Seifert
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Term for group of guys attempting to show who is alpha?
42 votes

An extremely crude term for this is a dick-measuring contest: (vulgar, figuratively) A situation in which people (usually men) compete, often over superficial characteristics, to demonstrate their ...

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Replacement for "pegged" in "pegged for disposal"
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38 votes

Consider slate: 2. a. To put down (a name, etc.) on a writing-slate; to set down, book, for something; also constructed to with infinitive. Also, to plan, propose, or schedule (an event). Chiefly ...

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Does calling something a 'Novelty Act' bring down its image?
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37 votes

Calling a performer a "novelty act" implies that their primary appeal is their novelty, rather than their actual abilities or talents. As such, it frequently carries a dismissive meaning, ...

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Difference between 'Candor' and 'Sincerity'
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27 votes

In English, the word candor [candour in many dialects] has come to primarily mean openness and frankness, and a tendency to tell harsh truths. The OED defines it as: Freedom from reserve in one's ...

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How can you lift an elephant with one hand?
26 votes

A possible re-writing is How can you lift an elephant one-handed? One-handed can act as either a adjective or an adverb. If it is placed after the object ("elephant"), the word order implies that ...

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What is the American version of the word ''tearaway''? (a young person who behaves in an uncontrolled way and is often causing trouble)
21 votes

The word delinquent (basically standing for the legal term juvenile delinquent) is frequently used in US English in this sense. The OED has the definition A person who commits an offence against the ...

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How to express happiness on someone's failure?
19 votes

While it does not name the emotion itself, a common saying in this sort of circumstance is good riddance. "Riddance" means (OED) A deliverance or relief which consists in getting rid of something. ...

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What is the idiom, expression or proverb for 'If you let them use you once they will use you for life'?
18 votes

The camel's nose is a metaphor that is sometimes used for this. It is supposedly of Arab origin, but was adopted into English around the mid-19th century, and may in fact be British in origin. An ...

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A verb for "picking small bits of food from the tray or the main plate before it is served or others have started eating"
16 votes

My parents (both of whom were US-born with roots in the Midwest) would use snitch for exactly this purpose: To steal (something, usually something of little value); pilfer: snitched a cookie from ...

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Term to describe the relationship between two people when they share an Alma Mater
13 votes

People who went to the same school as you, even during a different year, are often described as "fellow alumni". A couple of uses: How to find and reach out to fellow alumni: We all know that our ...

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Single word for "refusing to move to next activity unless present one is completed."
10 votes

Serialist could have something of the meaning you want. The problem is that it has some specific meanings in other contexts, and doesn't seem to have been used in relation to the completion of tasks. ...

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Who is the person in charge of the vehicles within a company?
8 votes

Another phrase used for a the vehicles belonging to an organization is the motor pool. This usually has the connotation of a fleet of vehicles that do not "belong" to a particular worker but are ...

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Word for physical resistance / resisting another's onslaught?
7 votes

To mount a resistance is less ambiguous: "Can the humans mount a resistance?" "Can the humans mount an effective resistance?" (The latter would imply that the humans may try to ...

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A term for a woman complaining about things/begging in a cute/childish way
5 votes

"Baby talk" normally refers to the way adults talk to children & infants, but it can also be used as a form of flirtation between adults. From NBC News: Let’s say you’ve been given the super ...

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A verb for when we actively extract information from others?
5 votes

I can think of two options (all definitions OED): To suss out the information: To investigate, to discover the truth about (a person or thing). This usually has the connotation of finding ...

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What's the Idiom or typical expression when a person "takes a joke further"
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4 votes

To "run with" something is (OED) to advance or proceed with (an idea, undertaking, etc.). To "run with a joke" would therefore be to play along with a joke and add new ideas to it. Here's an ...

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Synonym for prostrating on the ground, typically in worship or submission, starts with 'g'
Accepted answer
4 votes

Do you mean genuflect? Genuflection (or genuflexion), bending at least one knee to the ground, was from early times a gesture of deep respect for a superior. The Latin word genuflectio, from which ...

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Is there a word or phrase for one mistaken belief leading to a web of false ones?
3 votes

The phrase garbage in, garbage out—often abbreviated to GIGO—expresses the idea that if you start with bad inputs to your system, you're not going to get good outputs. While the phrase came from ...

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Adjective for "impressive without seeming to try very hard"
3 votes

You use the word effortless in your question; but as far as I can tell it actually answers your question. The OED definition is: Acting without effort; unstrained, easy. This is often applied to ...

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What noun means opposite of "slacker" but is less extreme than "overachiever"?
3 votes

A go-getter is someone who is productive, active, and energetic. From the OED: An enterprising or ambitious person; a person who is determined or likely to succeed; an achiever. "We want to ...

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Non-pejorative synonym of "notoriety"
3 votes

Notability is a possibility, though it is more neutral than positive: 2. a. Noteworthiness, distinction, prominence; an instance of this. "The village of Kexby has always enjoyed a notability ...

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"Sacrifice" vs. "forgo": which is better in this sentence?
3 votes

Sacrifice often has the connotation of giving up something you already had: To surrender or give up (something) for the attainment of some higher advantage or dearer object. If I had a well-...

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Wishful thinking to the point of lunacy
3 votes

You could describe Person A as having an idée fixe. From Wikipedia: An idée fixe is a preoccupation of mind believed to be firmly resistant to any attempt to modify it, a fixation. As a less-...

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A return of money that won't be counted against an order's balance
3 votes

I would call it a courtesy refund, in the same sense as a "courtesy car" or a "courtesy phone": something that is supplied to help out a customer and ensure their continued ...

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Difference in meaning between “elderly” and "old"?
2 votes

Most of the other answers have discussed the difference in meaning when the two words are applied to people. It's also worth noting that elderly (almost) always applies to people*, while old can ...

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"To be provided" in context
2 votes

I don't think it's ungrammatical, strictly speaking. However, the active voice in "can contact" contrasted with the passive voice in "to be provided with" is a bit confusing. If I had to say ...

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Syllable emphasis in "caricature"
2 votes

The OED only lists one pronunciation, with a primary stress on the first syllable and a secondary stress on the last: caricature, n. /ˈkarɪkəˌtjʊə/ The Merriam-Webster dictionary lists several ...

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Does "suggesting conclusions" sound odd to you?
2 votes

It's a bit of an odd construction, but I don't think it's that unusual if you view the data as suggesting a conclusion rather than a person doing so. Certainly one could say that Our data suggest ...

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Is there a word for someone who is a killjoy yet also "The voice of caution?"
2 votes

If you are prudent, you're acting in a way that shows careful forethought and is relatively cautious. A prudentialist (not a common word, but it's in the OED) is someone whose primary motivations are ...

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Counterpart to Confidante: Word for Someone Crying out for Help
1 votes

You might consider complainant. While it has a legalistic meaning, it can also mean "one who complains" in a general sense; and the word thereby focuses on what the "interlocutor"...

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