dave
  • Member for 11 years, 3 months
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How to use two interrogatives in one sentence
3 votes

Neither "which color" nor "what color" sound right to me. How about: I took a survey on how many cars of each colour were sold last month.

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English Redundancy
2 votes

I think it would be pretty unusual to say monthly recurring particularly in your context. A monthly payment plan strongly implies that it is recurring. In my view, adding recurring to the phrase is ...

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To put something in service of, or in lower priority to
2 votes

You could try rearranging the order: He is able to put the needs of the team ahead of his ego.

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In or at the department of English and American Studies?
2 votes

Neither seems quite right to me. I'd probably re-organise your sentence thus: I was one of the interviewees for a position in the department of English and American studies at the University of X.

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Largest Fee vs Highest Amount when referring to a monetary (USD) amount
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2 votes

Both terms are valid and I'm not sure either would be preferred. Given that you are talking about fees explicitly, I'd lean towards the "largest fee". You might also want to consider the "maximum fee"....

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Does the word "validator" exist?
2 votes

Well the word definitely exists. I think its origin would be technical, eg. it is heavily used in software engineering. I'm not sure it's made the leap into common usage for "something or someone that ...

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Apostrophe for plural nouns
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1 votes

If the word is indeed plural then the apostrophe comes after the 's', ie. option (2) is correct. If you were talking abut a single shareholder then you would use option (1).

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Holes have been drilled in each corner of the board so that it can be fixed to the wall
1 votes

I think it would safe to do so, noting that the verb has to change too, ie. A hole has been drilled in each corner of the board ... This is less ambiguous than the original.

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What does "the young go getters" mean?
1 votes

A go-getter is someone with energy and drive, who really goes after what they want. They are prepared to work hard to achieve their goals. You don't have to be young to be a go-getter, but I guess it'...

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What category is an apostrophe in that a comma or a semicolon is not in?
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1 votes

Apostrophes, commas, semicolons and colons are all considered to be punctuation marks (along with several others). Commas, semicolons and colons could be categorised (grouped) together as pauses. ...

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Idiom that means "to understand a story better by listening to it from the beginning?"
1 votes

I think that "to start a story at the beginning" is fairly idiomatic; it's certainly a familiar construct. For something slightly more dynamic, you could emulate Lewis Carroll and use "Begin at the ...

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Is there a verb that means "to alert audibly"?
1 votes

How about: logNotifyAudibly() I'm not sure you really need a verb in this instance. The audibly is really a property of the log event isn't it? Also, if the emitted sounds changes (from a beep to ...

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Synonym for "quantity-related"
0 votes

A phrase I commonly hear for a quantity-related discount is bulk discount. It may depend on where you are in the world, but I'm used to asking for a discount for buying in bulk. As to whether it's ...

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I have no brothers or I have no brother?
0 votes

B's reply should be: We have no potatoes. Typically (in English) when you have zero of something, the plural is used. This is unless the sense would require it, which is not the case here.

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"I suggest you not go there" or "I suggest you to not go there"
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0 votes

I would normally use: I suggest you do not go there. or: I suggest you don't go there.

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Is "Where do you sit?" correct for asking someone where their workspace is?
0 votes

Yes. If you asked that in Australia you would be understood perfectly.

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Word for 'of or related to division'
-1 votes

Although I'd love the answer to be 'divisive', I'm not sure there's a direct equivalent. In mathematics we speak of the 'multiplicative inverse' which is too much of a mouthful for your purposes. The ...

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