Chris H
  • Member for 6 years, 3 months
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The person receiving notifications ("notifyee" does not seem right...)
3 votes

The person who receives something (a notification, a letter, a package, etc.) is the recipient. Example dictionary definition from Oxford Dictionaries: recipient noun A person or thing that ...

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employ, employer, employee - can I generalize this pattern to (verb), (verb)er, (verb)ee?
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2 votes

In short, no, you cannot use this for all verbs. The addition of -er/-or to indicate the person or item which performs the verb can be applied to most verbs. As @EdwinAshworth points out in the ...

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Are those two sentences the same?
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2 votes

You should find a different proofreader because this one is not very good at their job. I don't think I can really add anything to what you've said yourself: because they use different meanings of ...

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What are the parents of your uncle's wife called?
2 votes

As far as I'm aware, there's no specific term in English for that relationship. They are certainly not grandparents, that term applies only to the parents of your parents.

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Which of these words would you use in BrE vs AmE? Are there any regional differences associated with these words?
1 votes

Based on information from google ngrams, and assuming that you're interested in the current usage (historical is also shown in the plots, if not). These screenshots may be a little small to read some ...

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What does it mean? "obtaining the correct papers"
1 votes

I don't think it's really an idiom, it's just a literal phrase. Perhaps "papers" is a slightly obscure term for non-native speakers, though. "Papers" here is used as a catch-all for various documents, ...

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What is the accepted stance on using "they" in a singular form?
1 votes

In formal usage I'd avoid the singular 'they', but it's very common in my experience (native British English speaker) in everyday language. It's primarily used when referring to somebody whose gender ...

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What is the difference between "Alphabet" and "Alphabets"?
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0 votes

Your question relates to a difference between the various forms of English spoken around the world. In most varieties of English, the alphabet refers to the collection of letters used by a writing ...

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