Katherine
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What does "Give a penny to Belisarius" mean?
4 votes

Belisarius supposedly was condemned to life as a blind beggar (i.e., penury) by order of Justinian to have Belisarius' eyes put out. Thus, the phrase Give a penny to Belisarius was what this once ...

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Difference between "civic rights" and "civil rights"
4 votes

According to the Grammarist, the terms Civic and Civil are defined as follows: Civic is an adjective which describes an object or person as having to do with a city or town, or that the object was ...

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What is a flake?
4 votes

Flaky is defined by OED as eccentric; behaving in a strange or unusual way; tending to forget things. It is also seen in reference to unreliable software. Therefore, both of your definitions of flake ...

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The meaning of "upon one"
2 votes

Strong upon me the life that does not exhibit itself, yet contains all the rest, "Strong upon me" is a poetic way of saying that the following condition is deeply concerning. So Whitman is bemoaning ...

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What is the word for the act of drawing air through your mouthful of wine?
2 votes

Wine tasting involves the nose, the tongue, and retronasal passage. When a sommelier slurps wine, it is to smell the aromas of the warmed wine that is in the mouth. This technique is "retronasal ...

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Should one capitalise the first word in the body of a letter?
2 votes

Dear Recipient is a salutation, it is not part of the following text. Thus, it is set off above the content of the letter and followed by a comma in less formal communication. In business formatting,...

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Which word is appropriate: arrange or rearrange
2 votes

The original answer of rearrange being the proper word to apply to a revision of an existing thing is correct. Yet, your resistance to this can be surmised if one takes the whole sentence into ...

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Difference between an Explanation and a Description from the view of critical reasoning
Accepted answer
2 votes

I believe you have Explanation and Description reversed. According to the OED, Explain means to "Make (an idea, situation, or problem) clear to someone by describing it in more detail or revealing ...

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Articles when describing commercial logos
Accepted answer
1 votes

The use of "the" or "a" in reference to a company's logo depends on circumstance. In the first place, we assume that a company has designed only one logo for their business. Given that assumption, ...

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Can items themselves be mandatory, or only their related processes?
1 votes

"Mandatory" is an adjective that modifies a noun (things or processes), indicating an obligation. In your examples: "[U]niforms are not mandatory, but the wearing of them is." "[E]xam ...

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Should I say "One-Click RemovER" or "One-Click RemovAL"?
1 votes

In the reference to a process, "removal" shows the action of taking something away. In reference to a tool, "remover" shows a substance to use for elimination or a thing to move something elsewhere....

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Which one to use Relevance or Correlation
1 votes

Use of relevance or correlation in this sentence depends on intended meaning of the relationship between the "documentary" and "today's world." Relevance: the degree to which something is related ...

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Of no subject is this more than administrative law
1 votes

Of no subject is this more true than administrative law Because this sentence is out of context, it is difficult to accurately explain the true meaning of "this" in relationship to administrative law ...

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What is it called when something sounds correct but actually is not always true, or even bad?
1 votes

Pathos comes to mind, where rhetoric is designed to persuade or influence through the speaker's appeal to emotion. According to OED, Pathos is defined as: (in writing, speech and plays) the power ...

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The origin of: “It takes two to tango”
1 votes

The concept suggested by the phrase It takes two to Tango was in use several centuries before the early 1900s. According to the facts presented in Jennifer Speake's book, "The Oxford Dictionary ...

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Is there a word for 'what a witness sees'?
1 votes

Although a witness does observe, an observer does not always witness. According to Hindu philosophy, a witness is described as one "who is here to observe and enjoy this world of objects, unending ...

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“poster awards” vs. “posters awards”
1 votes

Poster Awards. As a title, the plural is the thing being given, not multiple recipients.

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Act of Ending Friendship
1 votes

Alienated, disaffected, estranged, former, antecedent, erstwhile, deposed, heretofore, and ci-devant come to mind. Alienated: Cause (someone) to feel isolated or estranged, or to become unsympathetic ...

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Using "at the present" or "nowadays" at the end of the sentence
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0 votes

Use of the word nowadays suggests a change from how things were or were done in the past. Use of at the present means now, and yet does not necessarily indicate permanence. Both would be correct ...

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Why is the second one wrong?
0 votes

The use of future tense (i.e., will be) does not confirm the prediction of to be successful. Use of the Future Perfect (i.e. will have been) relates to something that will already have happened before ...

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capacities to do or capacities in doing?
Accepted answer
0 votes

The second example combines two gerunds, making it an awkward presentation of thought. An editor would suggest it be changed to the first example construction (to invest in acquiring). As to the ...

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Word For A Feature That Is No More Striking, But Still Deeply Embedded
0 votes

Generic, cardinal, essential, fundamental, and principal, are just a few that come to mind. If I had to select one for your example, I would probably use "Cardinal." Something that is Cardinal is ...

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Different between 'effect' and 'impact'
0 votes

Care should be observed in the interchangeability of Effect/Impact when used as a verb. As noted in OED, Effect (v) is defined as "to make something happen," whereas Impact (v) is defined ...

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Use of preposition to demonstrate direction
-1 votes

"Someone saw me coming in the opposite direction / someone saw me coming to the opposite direction" In the first example, "in" means "observed direction from their position". In the second example, "...

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