Karasinsky
  • Member for 6 years, 7 months
  • Last seen more than 6 years ago
  • London, United Kingdom
Is "pretty ugly" an oxymoron?
12 votes

No, they are not oxymorons. Oxymorons contain words that have mutually exclusive meanings. Here's a fair description of this. In your example. "pretty" and "ugly" do not have opposite meanings. The ...

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When should I use "to do" and "to doing"
5 votes

Last year, two of her ministers suggested that convicted tycoons be pardoned if they could contribute to boosting economic growth. "Boosting economic growth" is a noun phrase that is an indirect ...

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Describing a book with big vocabularies?
4 votes

Sesquipedelian. This is a humorous and ironic word that literally derives from the Latin for "a foot and a half long" and refers to the use of long words, but could also apply to other instances of ...

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I do not know where did it fall
4 votes

I do not know where did it fall is not correct, familiar or idiomatic in any written or spoken variety of English that I've come across. I don't know where it fell is fine and normal.

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What does "rally behind one another" mean?
4 votes

When a group of people rally behind someone, it means they are uniting and cooperating to provide support to and solidarity with that person. If people rally behind one another, it means they are ...

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strange conditional
3 votes

They're both right but they mean different things. In your first sentence, you currently, while speaking, cannot imagine the consequences. "Can't" is thus the normal indicative mood. In the second ...

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Idiomatic phrase for small type words at end of a document
Accepted answer
3 votes

The "small words" at the end (as the questioner put it) which contain some less positive information is colloquially called "the small print" in English.

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Word constellation when using 'neither... nor'
2 votes

I think both versions are problematic. It's not common to form a complete sentence using "neither" and "nor" in the way those versions do. "Neither" and "nor", ...

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Was the BrEng term "coloured" derogatory in the 1970s?
2 votes

Here's part of an answer given by Michael Foot to a question that he was asked during a Radio 4 programme that was broadcast on 10 June 1973 (which was within just a few months of the setting of the ...

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Using archaic (obsolete) words for decimal penny
2 votes

You'll occasionally hear these old fashioned words for numbers of pence in an informal colloquial setting, but it's rare and confined to older people. Also, some idioms which refer to pre-decimal ...

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When is "and" appropriate but "as well as" is not?
2 votes

"As well as" has a lower precedence or associativity than "and". So if you think of it in arithmetic terms, "x and y, as well as z" means "(x and y) and z", where the brackets have a similar function ...

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Ma'am: Is it as in "ham" solely for the Queen, whilst it remains spoken "ma"+"um" (less any glotal stop) for all others?
Accepted answer
2 votes

Debrett's recommends us to pronounce Ma'am to rhyme with Pam. In my variety of British English, that is /Pæ:m/. My dialect exhibits the bad-lad split and "mam" has a long vowel. I pronounce Pam, palm,...

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Do I travel "up" or "down" to London from north of the city?
2 votes

Based on living fifty odd years in and around London — In general, a Londoner will talk about going "up" to a more northern area of London or somewhere further north than London, and "down" from such ...

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Definite article with the names of trains
1 votes

In the UK, we give names to "lines" or routes rather than the train. The definite article is usually used in normal speech, for example "The Victoria Line". A search for "Victoria Line" reveals that ...

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What is the right ordering of words depending upon the worth that they imply? Also, can you suggest me some more words?
1 votes

For the last two in your sequence, how about: Luxurious Exclusive

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Does it make sense to say "plummets upward"?
1 votes

No. Plummet always means to rapidly drop straight down.

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The word "mine": Anyone else use a velar nasal /maiŋ/ for "belongs to me" meaning, but still /main/ for "explosive"/"coal mine"?
1 votes

I've never heard any British English speaker use a nasal pronunciation. I have heard speakers from some regions in England (for example, parts of Essex and also rural parts of the West Midlands) ...

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Non-related cousin?
1 votes

They are your cousins' cousins. An English-speaking person wouldn't confuse this for a simpler relationship for which a single word or fixed phrase existed because (except where we want to avoid an ...

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Another way to say "Does not matter" in formal reports
1 votes

I would say in what way it doesn't matter, for example: The residents of City X enjoy favorable living conditions. There is heavy precipitation from time to time; this doesn't make the ...

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If he has come today or if he came today?
Accepted answer
0 votes

They are both normal and natural sentences in English, but have different meanings. The first one, in the perfect tense/aspect, draws attention to the continuing significance of his coming as at the ...

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"He" or "him" in these kind of sentences
0 votes

"That's him swimming" is the only form I've heard in my life in any of the varieties of English I've heard. I've never heard "that's he swimming" in any situation.

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Is there a word for a party leader whose outlook might as well be the party's slogan?
0 votes

I'll guess that you don't mean that the person "owns" the party as property to be used for his or her personal aims (which would make them an autocrat or even a dictator if the party were to exercise ...

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Most fitting word for a time interval with specific start and end?
0 votes

If I understand the original question, the issue is to make sure it's clear that the word or phrase specifically references the appointment details stated at the begin, after some intervening text ...

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What quality does a person lack who cannot understand another's point of view?
0 votes

I would say either "unaware of other people's thought processes" or "indifferent to other people's thought processes", depending on which of these two kinds of deficit you're referring to. Since the ...

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