Antony Quinn
  • Member for 11 years, 4 months
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Should there be a space before a percent sign?
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56 votes

According to Wikipedia there is no consensus on this in English: There is no consensus as to whether or not to include a space between the number and percent sign in English. Many authorities ...

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Which is correct: "you and I" or "you and me"?
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31 votes

You're right that it depends on the rest of the phrase (subject or object): "My wife and I are eating an apple" is correct because "my wife and I" is the subject of the sentence. You could replace "...

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"In order to...", "To..." or "For..."
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18 votes

"For passing" and "for finding" are not correct. "In order to" and "To" are correct, but I favour "To" because it is more concise: To pass the exams, ...

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Female Actor or Actress
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17 votes

a) It's correct to use the term "actor" for males and females b) It's an international phenomenon c) For origins and purpose of the change, see the Wikipedia entry for actor: The word actor ...

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Is there an online sample sentence database or search engine?
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16 votes

You could try using a corpus. For example, a search for copper in the British National Corpus returns 50 random sentences -- simply refresh the page to see another random sample: http://bnc.bl.uk/...

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Is "pain" a noun or a verb?
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14 votes

Sentence 2 is correct: "there is a pain in my eyes". Pain can be a noun or verb, for example: The pain is terrible = noun It pains me to see you this way = verb For more details please see:...

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"Undistinguishable" vs. "indistinguishable"
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11 votes

I'm a native English speaker, and I've never heard of "undistinguishable". I searched for undistinguishable and Google replied with: Did you mean: indistinguishable Princeton University's ...

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What is the *best* way to express that an email contains an attachment?
11 votes

For informal emails you could use: I've attached... For more formal emails you could write: Please find attached... For a discussion of enclosed vs attached please see: http://www....

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Which one is correct, "best wishes to you" or "best wishes for you"?
8 votes

Best wishes to you is correct. I've never heard a native English speaker say "best wishes for you", and there are no examples of "best wishes for you" in the British National Corpus. "Best wishes for ...

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Are these garden path sentences grammatically correct?
7 votes

All the sentences are grammatically correct, including your own. You could make the meaning clearer by adding punctuation, but this might spoil the fun. For example: The men, run through the ...

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What is a good way to refer to stories that are meant for adults?
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7 votes

It depends on your audience: if you're talking to children you could say "stories for grown-ups", and if you're talking to teenagers or adults you could follow GBackMania's advice and use "for {age} ...

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How do I pronounce Gaudí, the architect?
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6 votes

The "au" in Catalan (his native language) is pronounced like English "ow" (how, cow ...etc) and there's an accent on the "i" to indicate emphasis, so you pronounce it as "gow-DEE". However, most ...

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Idiom for saying "You are making someone go mad/angry."
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6 votes

If you say this to Richard, he'll... go nuts go crazy go mental explode lose it big time

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Which would be correct: "outputs" or "puts out"?
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6 votes

Any algorithm first reads the data, processes the data and finally outputs the processed data.

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Genetic Relatives
5 votes

Frisian is considered to be the closest "living" relative to English: Frisian is the language most closely related to English and Scots, but after at least five hundred years of being subject to ...

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Why do we use 'up' as adverbs for verbs?
5 votes

Bruno's right, they're phrasal verbs. Just think of how many phrasal verbs you can construct from "to get": get up, get down, get on, get off, get over, get under, get by, get through ...etc. I ...

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Plural of an initialism that ends with the letter S
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4 votes

A search on Google for OSes returns results from several established websites such as infoworld.com, osnews.com and linux.com, which suggests OSes is the accepted form.

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What is the origin of "Couldn't hit a cow's arse with a banjo"?
4 votes

Using Google's daterange feature, I did a search for pages dated 2000 to 2003 [1], and found the earliest verifiable mention of this phrase in a story in The Independent called My Side By David ...

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Contraction for 'are' with nouns
4 votes

No, it's not correct. You'd have to say: the candies are in the box, the women are at the car

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Has the Tangier island accent truly remained unchanged since the Elizabethan period?
3 votes

I heard the same thing about people living in the Appalachian Mountains. According to Bill Bryson in The Mother Tongue, this is a common misconception.

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When denoting a company name, followed by a strap line, what punctuation mark should I use?
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3 votes

Colon (:) or dash (—) is fine. Personally I find dashes easier to read in search engine result pages. I recommend Jakob Nielsen's Tagline Blues: What's the Site About? for advice on writing good ...

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Expressing an opinion: to me or for me?
3 votes

Hmm, tough one. Rearranging the sentences helped me see this a little more clearly: It makes no difference to me This suggests there is no effect on me materially, emotionally, financially ...etc. ...

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Pairs in common idioms/phrases
2 votes

There are some phrases that pair synonyms where one of the words is considered archaic, for example: kith and kin time and tide "Kith" and "kin" both mean "relatives" -- kith is archaic. "Time" and ...

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Why did English become a universal language and when?
2 votes

English may now be the world's lingua franca, but according to a review of Nicholas Ostler's latest book in The Economist the future looks quite different: English is expanding as a lingua-franca ...

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What are the most common tense mistakes made in English?
2 votes

As bikeboy389 said, you can learn a lot by looking at students' native languages. French and Italian students will sometimes say "I am born in..." when they mean "I was born in..." ("je suis ne a...", ...

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When did it become correct to add an “s” to a singular possessive already ending in “‑s”?
2 votes

My recollection from school (UK, 1980s) is that the apostrophe-only version is used for Biblical names, and the apostrophe-plus-s is used for everything else. According to this rule, you would write "...

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High School learning address
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1 votes

According to a discussion on Wordreference.com, you could say program of study (or "programme of study" if you're writing for a British audience).

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"Taiwan visa" or "Taiwanese visa"?
1 votes

Alternative: visa for Taiwan sounds just fine to my native English-speaker ears and removes any ambiguity.

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Favourite untranslatables
1 votes

Although a particle and not a word or idiom, there's the French untranslatable "ne" in the subjunctive mood. For example: Je ne doute pas qu'il n'ait raison = I do not doubt that he is right I ...

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"Fixing to" at the beginning of a sentence
1 votes

It's also appeared in song titles, most notably I-Feel-Like-I'm-Fixin'-To-Die I-Feel-Like-I'm-Fixin'-To-Die is the second album by the influential San Francisco psychedelic rock group Country ...

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