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Christian Geiselmann's user avatar
Christian Geiselmann's user avatar
Christian Geiselmann's user avatar
Christian Geiselmann
  • Member for 9 years, 2 months
  • Last seen more than 3 years ago
  • Hannover (Germany) and Sofia (Bulgaria)
20 votes
13 answers
3k views

An expression for what "worriers" do, as scoffing as German "Bedenkenträgerei"

16 votes
10 answers
3k views

A picturesque equivalent for German "Beutelschneiderei", i.e. what cut-purses and fraudsters do

9 votes
5 answers
2k views

English expression for what Germans call 'Kompetenzgerangel'

6 votes
6 answers
10k views

Isn't there a simple adverb for the opposite of 'loudly'? [closed]

4 votes
0 answers
566 views

A word or expression for being paralyzed by fear or scare, like German *Schockstarre* [duplicate]

4 votes
3 answers
4k views

Why are tax returns called tax returns, and is the term applicable outside the US? [closed]

3 votes
1 answer
83 views

Can "runtime" be used for something outside a computer programming context?

2 votes
3 answers
485 views

An expression for things that work out surprisingly easily (like German schwuppdiwupp)

2 votes
1 answer
79 views

Is "diversified" really a suitable translation for what Germans call "abwechslungsreich"?

2 votes
2 answers
16k views

Alternatives to the expression "double down on something"

1 vote
3 answers
837 views

Adjectives to indicate a problem's size (in good writing style)

1 vote
1 answer
4k views

Adjectives that can be used with the noun "need" to express how great the need is [closed]

1 vote
2 answers
144 views

Can my teachers be trainers or would I be taught by my shoes? [closed]

1 vote
1 answer
428 views

Again regarding the pronunciation of "multi-": adequateness to certain strata of society

0 votes
2 answers
778 views

Is "stew away" a valid English expression?

0 votes
4 answers
529 views

An expression for a child that refuses playing with others

0 votes
2 answers
534 views

A common term for a kitchen that is used for training purposes

0 votes
2 answers
395 views

Is "newcomers" an acceptable synonym for "new arrivals" in a country?

0 votes
2 answers
904 views

"My name is X and I come from Syria" vs. "My name is X and I am from Syria" [closed]