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12

Even in serious writing, as this sample clearly is, aimed at a serious audience, there is absolutely no problem, this being so because as a well established usage exists and as readers have no reasons to look for meanings that make for nonsense when the obvious one is pointed by the context, the real business in reading you is to understand what you mean. (...


6

The meanings of impotence (aka impotency) given by Lexico are 1 Inability to take effective action; helplessness. 2 Inability in a man to achieve an erection or orgasm. A man with erectile dysfunction is usually described as being impotent rather than 'having impotency', unlike 'having measles' or 'having the flu'.


2

I figured out the word by looking for the video that was talking about how the director studied the dialect. The word I was thinking of was “vernacular.” I found that the way I was describing it was more along the lines of “phonetics.”


2

The words used to describe these kinds of clauses vary a lot: I like Descriptive and Defining. American English has a tendency to use “that” to introduce defining clauses, and “which” or “who” (always preceded by a comma) for descriptive clauses – I think this is a good idea – but it is not a “rule”. (In British English, this tendency is not so marked.) ...


2

Two or even three "et cetera"s in a row are idiomatic and reasonably common, but informal. Multiple "et cetera"s can be used to emphasize the great number of omitted items or the speaker's feelings about them. A more familiar example of duplicating words for emphasis is "it was really, really good", which means the same thing as ...


2

The example from the grammar book is correct and breaks no rules of the English language. 'Truth' can be: An abstract noun equal in meaning to 'veracity', 'honesty' What we live by in our community is truth and justice. A regular noun equal to 'fact' You need to learn these scientific truths. A noun equal in meaning to 'reality', 'what happened' I ...


1

"Asset-type-specific keywords and patterns" - keywords and patterns that are of the type that are specific to assets. "Non-asset-type-specific keywords and patterns" - keywords and patterns that are of the type that are specific to non-assets. Pub Med https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/97870/ Type-specific and non-type-specific reactions ...


1

It is a generality. Gaskell is saying much the same as the contemporary “Hindsight is the only exact science”. Once we perceive the consequence of our mistakes it is easy to see how we could have avoided them.


1

don to put on (an article of clothing)


1

Standard usage and common practice show that this is correct, despite what you may have been taught from a grammarian standpoint. Most English native speakers don't know the grammar of their own language, as it is not usually taught in schools so thoroughly as in other countries. "The truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth"is a standard phrase for ...


1

The use of present tense in past narratives is called historical present tense. It serves multiple functions. One possible reason people use historical past tense is to show contrast between two points of time in the past. In the second sentence of your example, there is the event of hearing the buzzer and rushing out, and there is the event of getting to ...


1

Both are idiomatic, but have very slightly different meanings. "The contents" I would expect to be followed by a list of the items in the book (I don't necessarily mean the title of each chapter: it could be a list of themes). After content I would expect a single statement about the content as a whole.


1

If you are looking for a term for someone who causes others to be sympathetic towards her then inviting sympathy is probably what you are looking for. Also the object of sympathy for someone to whom people behave sympathetically, or for whom they have sympathy.


1

Quotation marks are used when quoting the words of a (real or fictional) person. You are asking this question yourself, not quoting anyone else; so no, it doesn't need them.


1

'He was one of our favourite students among us, the teachers' - sounds better.


1

Can you please tell me whether my reasoning is correct? You are right and the answer "3" is wrong - I like your thinking! You correctly point out that no fishing holes were dug. There were merely attempts at digging them. The simple past perfect, like all simple forms of the verb, indicates a complete action from start to finish - the holes were ...


1

The term "health intervention" is medical jargon (medical professionals do love their jargon) that simply refers to a medical treatment to address a specific condition. Making it "eHealth intervention" implies some type of virtual visit to a doctor or other medical professional who then prescribes a treatment.


1

The words best and friend combine to form a compound word, that is best friend. 'Best' is an adjective and 'friend' is a noun. So best friend is an example of an adjective/noun compound word. Bestfriend, although accepted widely is somewhere awkward. 'Best friend' should be used. Both Oxford dictionary and Merriam Webster dictionary include the word 'best ...


1

In general we'd use the indicative ("is") in cases like this in modern English, after "unless" of "if". A modal "should" is also possible: "Unless he should be mean, I'll help him", or "if he should be mean, I won't help him". Strictly, the present subjunctive ("be") is possible, but it ...


1

In the given example, "whoever" (the compound interrogative pronoun) is used to emphasize the interrogative pronoun. "Who told you?" is simple question. but to put stress on "who", we use "whoever".


1

I think he was trying to say that'' so many people taking drugs in high dose (according to them ) is nothing for me . It may be the meaning of the above sentence if you compare that unknown substance to drugs . That feels nothing here may be mean to say that effect of drug (like insomnia , hallucinations etc) feels nothing to me ..


1

It is not a synonym for 'extreme hunger', but I suggest desperation, given by Lexico as desperation mass noun A state of despair, typically one which results in rash or extreme behaviour. Her story is one of poverty and desperation typical of a country that has known nothing but war for the past decade. So the sentence could be As soon as ...


1

Some suggestions: voraciousness, n. (eager to consume great amounts of food) esurience, n. (excessive desire to eat) endacity/endaciousness, n. (characterized by voracity; devouring) starvationk, n. (act or process of starving) famished, adj. (suffering from starvation)


1

A common error (faux-pas) made in incoming phone messages is the receiver saying "I will return your call at my convenience." That's a non-welcoming use of the convenience phrase. It is polite to ask one to do something at "Their convenience" not your own. Otherwise you are saying "I'll do it when I'm good and ready." Here saying "At your preference" or "At ...


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