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161

That peculiarly written letter is called the R rotunda The r rotunda (ꝛ), "rounded r", is a historical calligraphic variant of the minuscule (lowercase) letter Latin r used in full script-like typefaces, especially blackletters. Unlike other letter variants such as "long s" which originally were orthographically distinctive, r rotunda has always ...


120

I found the term "grawlixes" here: The Lexicon of Comicana. Grawlixes Typographical symbols standing for profanities, appearing in dialogue balloons in place of actual dialogue. I also came across the terms "profanitype" and "symbol swearing." I think I like "grawlixes" best.


113

The Tironian et and the modern ampersand had different origins, with the Tironian et having been invented as one of ~13,000 symbols/shorthand by Cicero's scribe, Tiro. It persisted until it succumbed to a linguistic witch hunt during the middle ages, when suspicion was cast upon it for appearing to be a rune or secret cipher. (This detail has been rightly ...


50

These have also been called obscenicons. Several links on Language Log offer an in-depth look at their usage. More on the early days of obscenicons Obscenicons a century ago CALL ME... UNPRONOUNCEABLE The "word" represented by the symbols could be pronounced bleep: So people came up with a small set of conventional euphemistic readings for <expletive ...


50

Even though it looks like a seven, it's actually a shorthand character called a "Tironian et" From http://www.ualberta.ca/~sreimer/ms-course/course/abbrevtn.htm Tironian nota for "et" (this frequently looks like a small number "7" or, later, a "z" or a "z" inside a circle; cf. the ampersand: &): Tiro was a member of Cicero's household who ...


47

No, it would be seen as unusual, perhaps archaic. The only reason I is capitalised is that i doesn't stand out visually, and needs added visual emphasis. He, Him, and His are capitalised when referring to God (or variations thereof) in Jewish, Christian, and Islamic texts. In that context, You and Your (or more typically Thou, Thee, Thy, and Thine) would ...


45

While all will be understood, the convention in this situation is to use "at the time of writing". Alternatively you could say "as of October 2014". "At the time of writing we had just declared war with IS." "As of October 2014 the tax rate is 20%."


41

Contractions definitely aren't rude to use in informal conversations. It's difficult to say why anyone would change your text on SE network that way, but it definitely isn't usual. The only reason I can come up with is that if you're not a native speaker or your English isn't good enough, someone was trying to help save your question and dramatically edited ...


38

I have always seen this written as "to-may-to to-mah-to."


37

I tried to use "I" in the first version of my thesis (in mathematics). When my advisor suggested corrections, the most detailed and strongly-worded of them was to use "we"; later, I asked another young professor whether one could use "I" and she said "Only if you want to sound like an arrogant bastard", and observed that only old people with established ...


29

They are ditto marks. ditto stems from the Tuscan dialect of the Italian detto - 'said'; Latin dictus - 'said'. Oxford Dictionaries Online.


28

In American legal documents, "v." is normally used as the abbreviation of "versus" when describing the parties in a case, like if Mr Jones sues the XYZ Corporation the case will be called "Jones v. XYZ Corp". Or if the government charges someone with a crime, it will be "The United States v. Fred Jones". Outside of legal documents, "versus" is normally ...


27

After reading more pages of the 1591 dictionary it was made clear that it was an r. It is also made clear by reading the text in this image: In this image, taken from this page, you can see words such as more and or written with that type of r. As noted in the linked page: A variant of the long S is in full effect here, but so are a number of other ...


26

sic is Latin (so, thus) and is used to call attention to an error in an original quote. Specifically, it is used when quoting another to say, "this is not a typographical, spelling or grammar error on the part of the reporter; rather, the error was in the original, and we're quoting it without change."


25

Id est is not commonly used in academic writing today. Two reasons come to mind. The usage is at best uncommon: A basic JSTOR search will churn up articles dealing with Latin sources, where id est occurs in larger samples of Latin text. Even when I limit the search to 2000 and later, the top sources are all Latin-facing, with titles like: "Alabastrum, ...


22

It seems that these are called "section breaks" (sometimes "scene breaks"): Sections are visually separated from each other with a section break, typically consisting of extra space between the sections. They are a concern in the process of typography and pagination, where it may be desirable to have a page break follow a section break for the sake of ...


20

It's called a slip of the pen (more common), or slip of the keyboard (less common). Either is fine, and will be understood. If you desire to be precise with your idioms, go ahead and use "slip of the keyboard". It's not in as many dictionaries/thesauruses, but people use it, and it makes enough sense that no one should misunderstand it. I also agree with ...


20

You may get someone who uses Grammarly answering your question here. But you could also do a Google search which should pull up user experiences. One grammar expert who has nothing good to say about computerized writing checkers is Professor Pullum, co-author of A Cambridge Guide to English Grammar and contributor to Language Log. Here is an extract from ...


18

I believe that says Twentieth. With an oddly formed "e" in the "eth" and both Ts crossed by a single stroke.


17

Short Answer "See you there" and "see you then" are both fine. They are somewhere between formal English (see alternative phrases below) and informal/spoken language, where a "see you" or even "see ya/cheers/cu" might suffice. Alternative Phrases A very formal way to say this would be to write "I look forward to seeing you there". My (German/Canadian) ...


17

These can also be called swear symbols or curse symbols, as evidenced by this quote: But I enjoy the opportunity to use swear symbols. (Daniel Clowes, Cartoonist) Those terms are not as cool as the word grawlix, but they are still in the vernacular, and thus worthy of a mention.


17

Although the 7 was the ampersand on IBM's standard keyboard layout, that is hardly universal. The first nine printable characters in ASCII are ! " # $ % & ' ( ), which should give a good clue as to what the top row of a teletype keyboard looked like. On many early teletypes and terminals (and also, BTW, on the Apple ][), the shift key toggled bit 4 of ...


16

I don't think there's anything wrong with using we in single-author scientific journal papers. It's the tradition, and if you use I in scientific papers it stands out, not necessarily in a good way. On the other hand, a PhD thesis is not a scientific journal paper, but a PhD thesis, and if you want to use I in it I don't see anything wrong with that. The ...


16

There is no rule that related segments of words have to be spelled with the same sequence of letters. It might seem more logical to you, but that's never been a successful argument in changing English spelling*. We also write "deception", "deceive" and "deceit", and "reception","receive", and "receipt". In any case, the second digraph "ai" in "maintain" is ...


14

I don't know if LaTeX is considered a definitive source for mathematics writing style (although it was developed for typesetting math equations), but this link and this one seem to indicate that, yes, a period would be inserted after the equation in the example We used the equation x + y = z. This is the next sentence. The Wikipedia Manual of ...


12

To answer the question directly: yes, it is perfectly correct to write “a 5-mm-thick layer”. However, when not in prefix position, it would be “a layer that’s 5 mm thick”, this time without any hyphens. The accepted answer appears to be wrong in its assertion that there is something wrong with writing “a five-millimeter-thick layer”. There isn’t. Here ...


12

By all means write "I". By an amusing coincidence, I have in front of me the article Deformations of Symmetric Products, a proceedings article published by Princeton University Press. The author is the late George R. Kempf, a distinguished algebraic geometer, and on the very first page I read [not we read:-)]: "My proof uses heavily the deformation theory..."...


12

No, I wouldn't recommend doing so, as the phrase is informal. There are many formal alternatives you could use to make you sound more professional, some of those are: it is worth noting it might also be noted/observed


12

The whole point of the personal statement is to give the admissions officer a convincing impression of what kind of person you are, your passions and strengths, your most valued experiences, etc. It is pretty much impossible to do this without liberal use of the first person pronouns. In fact, if you try and avoid using I you may well end up with some ...


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