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167 votes
Accepted

Is that an "r" in "worship" in a text from 1591?

That peculiarly written letter is called the R rotunda The r rotunda (ꝛ), "rounded r", is a historical calligraphic variant of the minuscule (lowercase) letter Latin r used in full script-...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
  • 91.6k
61 votes

What did Tolkien mean by this awkward sentence structure?

As Mark Guarino asserts in this Chicago Tribune article, The Hobbit was meant to be read aloud. Not only was the prose intended to sound like someone speaking, but "[t]he voice is often written ...
Aralcar's user avatar
  • 1,178
29 votes

Is that an "r" in "worship" in a text from 1591?

After reading more pages of the 1591 dictionary it was made clear that it was an r. It is also made clear by reading the text in this image: In this image, taken from this page, you can see words ...
Charlie's user avatar
  • 2,605
28 votes
Accepted

What is it called when you use quotation marks to signify repeating a word or phrase?

They are ditto marks. ditto stems from the Tuscan dialect of the Italian detto - 'said'; Latin dictus - 'said'. Oxford Dictionaries Online.
WS2's user avatar
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24 votes
Accepted

Can we use "id est" in lieu of "i.e." in academic writing?

Id est is not commonly used in academic writing today. Two reasons come to mind. The usage is at best uncommon: A basic JSTOR search will churn up articles dealing with Latin sources, where id est ...
TaliesinMerlin's user avatar
23 votes
Accepted

How many syllables do these rules say that ‘every’ has?

No fixed answers Your problem with every is that many but hardly all words whose pronunciations end in [ɹi] or [ɹiz] have a variable number of syllables depending on how reduced the vowel sound ...
tchrist's user avatar
  • 136k
21 votes
Accepted

Does Grammarly predominantly give the correct use of English?

You may get someone who uses Grammarly answering your question here. But you could also do a Google search which should pull up user experiences. One grammar expert who has nothing good to say about ...
Shoe's user avatar
  • 33.2k
21 votes

What did Tolkien mean by this awkward sentence structure?

This is probably an example of a resumptive pronoun. It could also be an example of anacoluthon, which is the intentional breaking of syntax or grammar for effect. The following is speculation on my ...
siride's user avatar
  • 1,052
19 votes

How many syllables do these rules say that ‘every’ has?

Short answer: Because of a phonological process know as compression, every can be said with either 2 or 3 syllables. This happens to coincide with the "written method" described (see full ...
Araucaria - Him's user avatar
15 votes
Accepted

What are natural ways to express 'contra-positively' in writing?

The phrase on the other hand is used to introduce a statement differing with one just made in some unspecified way: on the other hand in a way that is different from the first thing you mentioned: ...
Edwin Ashworth's user avatar
13 votes

How would one describe a sound of boredom?

I'd describe that as a "groan"
RIanGillis's user avatar
12 votes
Accepted

Can I use the word "impotence" and not refer to erectile dysfunction

Even in serious writing, as this sample clearly is, aimed at a serious audience, there is absolutely no problem, this being so because as a well established usage exists and as readers have no reasons ...
LPH's user avatar
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9 votes
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Is the em dash used in formal writing?

Em dashes can be used if allowed by your style guide (but don't use them too often). For example, this is what APA says: First, when would you use an em dash? The Publication Manual (p. 97) notes ...
Laurel's user avatar
  • 66.6k
9 votes

Is that an "r" in "worship" in a text from 1591?

I can only help with the way the word 'worship' was printed during the 1500s. These are the various bible translations of Matthew 4:10 (Thou shalt worship the Lord thy God) from 1175 to 1568. I have ...
Nigel J's user avatar
  • 24.8k
8 votes

Is "commerical" a valid and different word from "commercial"?

In virtually all cases, commerical is simply a misspelling of commercial. (Your question is a rare—and perhaps only—example where it is not!). Many of the hits that show up in the google search you ...
linguisticturn's user avatar
8 votes

What are natural ways to express 'contra-positively' in writing?

Conversely would be perfectly acceptable here, as the word in common parlance simply suggests some type of reversal or contrast, rather than the very specific meaning it takes in the domain of ...
Nuclear Hoagie's user avatar
8 votes
Accepted

Is there a word for "a broad range of knowledge"?

generalism Expertise in a narrow range of knowledge is called "specialism," such an expert being called a "specialist," while expertise in "a broad range of knowledge" is ...
Benjamin Harman's user avatar
7 votes

What does this sentence mean from "The Box Tunnel"?

The normal meaning of "Could not see X for Y" is that Y is obscuring X and preventing you from seeing it. In this case eyes and mouth would not be literally obscuring the nose, so it is not ...
DJClayworth's user avatar
  • 26.1k
6 votes

Is there a proper name for the 3 asterisks that are used to suggest temporal discontinuity?

I don't have the reputation to comment on @Alexa's post connecting Wodehouse and "zareba", but I tracked down an example of Wodehouse's usage in this context. In his story "Something to Worry About", ...
millikan's user avatar
  • 161
6 votes

NORMINAL — normal or with nominal mistake?

Lol, he's here making fun of another video. In the video Intelsat 35e Launch Webcast the narrator at 11:37 min says "Propulsion continues to be NORMINAL" instead of "Propulsion continues to be ...
WritingShort's user avatar
6 votes

What are natural ways to express 'contra-positively' in writing?

If one is writing for an audience that knows the meaning of contrapositive(ly) it is, of course, best to use that term; no other term can convey quite the same idea. If one is writing for an audience ...
jsw29's user avatar
  • 8,641
6 votes

Is there a word for "a broad range of knowledge"?

In this particular context, one option (as mentioned in Lambie's comment) is dilettantism. This refers to behaving like a dilettante, which is defined by Cambridge as: a person who is or seems to be ...
alphabet's user avatar
  • 19k
5 votes
Accepted

Alternative to "Hear" With Written Communication

The word "see" fits in semantically with your example: I would really like to see what you have to say about X. This has a nice two-fold meaning, as Cambridge dictionary includes a meaning of "to ...
jme's user avatar
  • 173
5 votes

Word for common knowledge in a scientific setting?

Scientific consensus (from Wikipedia): the collective judgment, position, and opinion of the community of scientists in a particular field of study. It also relates to Kuhn's paradigm shift which ...
Boondoggle's user avatar
  • 1,174
5 votes
Accepted

When can I omit the subject?

In a word: no. You have to have a pronoun or other noun here: “since it was carved”. You can usually omit the subject in the context “Subject predicate and predicate” (e.g., “Sculpture A exhibits ...
Daniel Harbour's user avatar
5 votes

Can I use the word "impotence" and not refer to erectile dysfunction

The meanings of impotence (aka impotency) given by Lexico are 1 Inability to take effective action; helplessness. 2 Inability in a man to achieve an erection or orgasm. A man with erectile ...
Weather Vane's user avatar
  • 21.4k
5 votes

How would one describe a sound of boredom?

There are many verbs and adjectives you could use here! Assuming you are using show-not-tell, a way to describe something like this could simply be to detail the actions of this character. For example,...
Lilith Hope's user avatar
5 votes

How would one describe a sound of boredom?

Blarg (blargh, blerg) and argh are often used as an interjection to express boredom. However, these onomatopoeic words would convey the intended feeling within the context as they can be used to ...
ermanen's user avatar
  • 63.3k
4 votes

Why is it spelled "maintenance" and not "maintainance?"

This can be explained by looking at where these words come from: French. In French, to maintain is maintenir, literally: to handhold. The stress is, as expected, on the last syllable. So what is I ...
reinierpost's user avatar
4 votes

Alternative to "Hear" With Written Communication

Some alternatives are learn, find out, or know, for instance: I would really like to find out what you think about X. I like these because they work in any medium (speech, text, etc.). If it's a ...
Saehry's user avatar
  • 41

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