47

As a matter of style, many U.S. publishers follow the general rules given by the Chicago Manual of Style, fifteenth edition (2003) at 7.51, 7.53, and 7.54 under the heading "FOREIGN WORDS": 7.51 Italics. Italics are used for isolated words and phrases in a foreign language if they are likely to be unfamiliar to readers. [Examples omitted.] ... ...


42

In the case of "acronyms" such as R&D the spaces would normally be omitted, but where the surrounding elements are words (for example, Tate & Lyle), spaces are invariably present. Here's a link to Marks and Spencer's small print, where they refer to themselves as both M&S and Marks & Spencer on the same web page. Just to clarify a point ...


34

Although you can put treason and traitor in quotation marks or italics, the use of words like in the sentence to indicate that they are being referenced as words rather than syntactic entities means that you don't have to. The use of quotes or italics is more common, but it's not essential in this construction. Also, between quotation marks or italics, ...


29

"I and someone are interested" is grammatically correct. It is the convention in English that when you list several people including yourself, you put yourself last, so you really should say "Someone and I are interested." "Someone and I" is the subject of the sentence, so you should use the subjective case "I" rather than the objective "me". "Someone and I" ...


27

"I can have cheeseburger" while a little odd could potentially be grammatically correct. The question is whether "cheeseburger" is uncountable or not. In most cases it would be countable, and consequently "I can have a cheeseburger" would be appropriate. However, one could certainly imagine this discussion: Me: You have a restricted diet, what protein can ...


26

It's never bad form to use passive form. It's just that in speech, we tend to use a lot of this, but there's nothing wrong with using the passive form in writing, or in speech. From the Passive Engineer: Despite the admonitions of grammar checkers, the passive construction has a legitimate function. When you want to emphasize results, use the passive. ...


26

As an American, I can report that everyone I know, even highly educated people, use these forms several times a day. People in business meetings, professors giving lectures,... everyone. Sometimes people are being slow, clear, and deliberate, in which case they will pronounce the full phrase, which does sound more formal by comparison. My sense, as an ...


26

The gassy emissions from these giant dinosaurs may have been enough to warm the Earth, the researchers say. From: The preposition from, which is modifying the noun emissions in the Original Poster's example, indicates the source, or origin of the noun. It is a very common usage of this preposition and is frequently observed. Consider the following ...


26

Emails and email are both correct plurals, but each has its own context. It depends on whether or not you are using it as a countable or uncountable noun. Email You can use email as an uncountable noun, just like mail. For example, "I received lots of email today" or "John sends me too much stupid chain email". But, you cannot use email as a countable ...


25

The sequence of "dots" to which you refer are called an ellipsis. Although it's common to write it as three periods ..., note that strictly it's a special typographic character …. A proper ellipsis is always three dots, no more, no less. Different style guides have different guidelines. If you are writing for a specific publication, use what is in their ...


25

I don't think any of us can say for sure, but it looks to me like User B is holding fast to the Thou Shalt Not Split Thine Infinitives commandment (hence, don't put an also in the middle of the can be, and don't insert a generally inside the are known). As for my personal opinion, I think the versions of User A sound more natural, and User B is sacrificing ...


25

I use a P.S. rather often in my emails, when the content of the P.S. is unrelated to the rest of the body of the message. For example, if I was writing two or three paragraphs about a database problem to a colleague, but I knew his wife had been recently released from the hospital, I might end the message with something like: P.S. I hope your wife is ...


23

I can't speak to whether the New York Times is following a style guide that bids them to leave off the quotation marks. I would have written that paragraph with quotes. I can, however, answer your second question. The term you are looking for is the "use-mention distinction." From the above-linked Wikipedia article: The distinction between use and ...


22

The Chicago Manual of Style, 15th Edition (2003) has this entry under "Exclamation Point": 6.77 Exclamation rather than question. A question that is essentially an exclamation usually ends with an exclamation point. How could you possibly believe that! When will I ever learn! If we take this guidance seriously, it seems to me, then for ...


22

Using Title Case (e.g. Export Data to Folder) rather than Sentence Case (e.g. Export data to folder) usually depends on the style of your organisation. There are many guides about when to use it e.g. MLA, APA, and AP. However, as it's a style thing, there may be no set rule for your app, so whichever you prefer will be perfectly acceptable.


22

There are many synonyms that a thesaurus of your choice will be quick to provide. However, consider this: There is no reason to have the thuses in there in the first place. Remove them completely, and you're still conveying the same information. It is quite obvious that each of the sentences logically flows from the previous one. Later in life, neural ...


21

End punctuation for captions is ultimately a house style issue. I would certainly expect a caption containing more than one complete sentence to have end punctuation. But sentence fragments are subject to idiosyncratic handling. At the magazine where I work, for example, we would leave unpunctuated a fragmentary caption consisting solely of a manufacturer ...


20

You may get someone who uses Grammarly answering your question here. But you could also do a Google search which should pull up user experiences. One grammar expert who has nothing good to say about computerized writing checkers is Professor Pullum, co-author of A Cambridge Guide to English Grammar and contributor to Language Log. Here is an extract from ...


19

In the original context, how to correct this error was intended as a question, but this is not a standard way to ask a question. It isn't a sentence, nor is it an interrogative, and it shouldn't have a question mark at the end of it. It's a content clause, or what is misleadingly called a "noun clause." Content clauses of this type would typically be used in ...


19

I suppose the phrase could be just extra meaningless words. Instead of saying, "The figure is expressed in terms of a percentage", you could say, "The figure is expressed as a percentage". But using the phrase "in terms of" adds some emphasis. The example from the quote, "In terms of cost, it is high", is just poor grammar. What is high? There is no proper ...


17

My answer focuses on the header question about decades—which is the question that most readers will probably expect to find answers to here. With regard to decades expressed in numerals rather than spelled out in letters, some style guides recommend omitting an apostrophe, while others recommend including it. For example, from The Chicago Manual of Style, ...


17

A C.V. or résumé is not a narrative, but a summary. Brevity is prized, and as such, you would omit the words indicating person altogether. Your profile or summary would be neither Karla is a software developer with 4.5 years of professional experience in OOP nor I am a software developer with 4.5 years of professional experience in OOP but simply ...


17

"Sans" is a common enough word in English that I would not bother with italics. But I also think in your sentence that the word "without" scans better, and I'd use that instead of "sans" for esthetics reasons.


16

The highest-scoring answer to this question asserts that using the serial comma is "purely [a matter of] written style and [therefore] optional." To demonstrate that neither including serial commas nor omitting serial commas leads in all cases to ambiguity-free sentences, he cites a familiar pair of amusingly misinterpretable dedications: To my ...


16

Based on the example you've given, I think the most clear answer is: Advertisement and Marketing. Words like "nite" as in "Nick at Nite" or "thru" as in "Drive Thru", "tonite" as in "Tonite Only", even "donut" as in "Dunkin' Donuts", are all marketing and advertisement inventions--mostly of the American variety. While donut predates Dunkin' Donuts by ...


16

It's called a neologism: ne·ol·o·gism noun a new word, meaning, usage, or phrase. the introduction or use of new words or new senses of existing words. a new doctrine, especially a new interpretation of sacred writings. Psychiatry. a new word, often consisting of a combination of other words, that is understood only by the speaker: ...


16

I think you've at least partially described Dramatic Irony. Irony that is inherent in speeches or a situation of a drama and is understood by the audience but not grasped by the characters. The audience is aware of something that a character is oblivious to. This is used for drama as well as humour. If this is not quite specific enough, then already ...


16

In general, it is good practice that the symbol that a number is associated with agrees with the way the number is written (in numeric or text form). For example, $3 instead of 3 dollars. Note that this doesn't apply when the numbers are large, so it is perfectly fine to write 89.5 percent, as eighty-nine-and-a-half percent is very clunky. This source ...


15

Et cetera, etcetera, etc., &c are frowned on in an academic register, probably because they seem slapdash and offhand: they give the impression that you can't be troubled to do the reader the courtesy of providing a complete enumeration—or worse, are incapable of doing so.* This of course overlooks the possible discourtesy of requiring the reader ...


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