12

The whole point of the personal statement is to give the admissions officer a convincing impression of what kind of person you are, your passions and strengths, your most valued experiences, etc. It is pretty much impossible to do this without liberal use of the first person pronouns. In fact, if you try and avoid using I you may well end up with some ...


7

The simple answer is to turn your sentences around so that I isn't the subject. I got to learn a lot about neuroscience. Neuroscience was a fascinating subject because... - I worked on designs and blueprints for building a rocket ship. A favorite project was designing blueprints for building a rocket ship. Etc.


7

Well, the requested information sounds stilted to me (British English native speaker). I suggest: Open the email with a bit more than 'Hi'. E.g.: Hi, thanks for getting back to me. Rather than 'the requested information', use 'my phone number': My phone numbers are 0000000 (primary) and 0000000 (secondary). Conclude the email with a bit more ...


6

In an academic paper you should not use words interchangeably. Once you start referring to an experiment or to a study, then you should use the same term throughout the paper. In the example you give, a study may be part of an experiment and so the words would have different specific meanings in the context of your paper. You should define your use of the ...


4

Any is polysemous. AHD: any [quantifier] One, some, every, or all without specification choosing examples: Are there any messages for me? [meaning one or some] Any child would love that. [meaning every] But The system is deterministic if any two runs produce the same result. is itself an example of a scope ambiguity: Do we ...


4

As suggested in comment by Dan Bron : aimless. Lacking direction or aim; purposeless; desultory; (also) without the means of taking aim OED Albert Einstein’s best ideas came when he was aimless. Yours can too qz.com


3

Preposition phrases ordinarily follow the term they modify or complement, so changing the order often changes the meaning. However, determining whether a PP modifies or complements, and just what a PP means as either a modifier or complement, is often very complex. For instance: Mayra is very happy in her life with Harry. Here with Harry is almost ...


3

Any thing means considering one of the things. Every thing is considering all the things individually. Mostly they can be used interchangeably but "any" usually means negatively. For example: -- You can use every thing that you have. -- You cannot use any thing!


3

"Faster than a speeding bullet! More powerful than a locomotive! Able to leap tall buildings in a single bound!" "Look! Up in the sky!" "It's a bird!" a woman cries. "It's a plane!" a man shouts. "It's SUPERMAN!" The above may mean nothing at all to you, and most users, and it certainly says something about ...


3

I've seen rudderless used in this context. 'He doesn't know what he wants/needs, he has nothing going on; he's rudderless.' ODO: rudderless ADJECTIVE 1.1 Lacking a clear sense of one's aims or principles. ‘But doesn't all this leave us dangerously rudderless, drifting on relativistic seas?’ ‘Entering their thirties, the men are ...


3

Your sentence is OK. Seek takes a direct object. Seek for is understandable, but I don't think a native speaker would ever say it.


3

Modern essay style accepts the use of "I", especially in preference to older uses of passive voice that now tend to look stilted, e.g. "one would opine" or "it was thought" rather than "I think".


3

Since in this sentence is a conjunction; both parts of your sentence are complete sentences by themselves, so you need a conjunction word (or a semicolon) to join them together. Without since, this becomes a run-on sentence.


3

I support the answer provided by @LBH. However, you should drop "the" in all instances of "the solution 1" and "the solution 2". This would give you: The temperature and pressure of solution 1 are higher and lower, respectively, than those of solution 2. I would also consider capitalizing all instances of "solution". ...


2

I was walking down the street when suddenly it hit me, "Wait!" I said, "Look at that!" "There are seven dwarfs and one... wait, where's Sleepy?" "Take one more step and I'll— Halt!" (gunshot) I think the important part is where and what word you cut off. You can't stop at when and have the effect you're looking for. "If you're going to build a time ...


2

No, you shouldn't. Actually, you mustn't. EDIT/EXPLANATION: In formal writing, it is not permitted as scopes of theoretically synonimical words may not actually overlap in various fields of science. That is why it is not uncommon to begin a paper with a chapter on terms used and their definitions. In real life situations, whether you say (of top of my ...


2

What you've written is correct. "Camera assignments, camera settings and DVR settings" are objects of "Create, edit and delete." You need the qualification on settings because you have both camera settings and DVR settings.


2

Yes, you can but usually you add a usual word, always the same, and this word is "respectively". The temperature and pressure of the solution 1 are higher and lower(,) respectively(,) than those of the solution 2. or The temperature and pressure of the solution 1 are respectively higher and lower than those of the solution 2"


1

You want to emphasize the word "addends", and not lighten it up to "The sum of x and y is 5, when x is 4 and y is 1"? "The sum of addends x and y is 5". The preceding statement is always true when x is 4 and y is 1. "The sum of addends x and y is 5". Sufficient conditions for this to be true include the combination of ...


1

Both sentences are dreadful. That is, if you wish to communicate something rather than sound good. Your explanation at the outset of the question is actually rather clearer. What are you saying the company should do? "proactively develop" something How can anyone develop something other than proactively? "reducing and lowering" something. Why both words? ...


1

Make a statement rather than saying why the action was negated. The room was too dark for her to see him shake his head. She could not see him shake his head in the dark room. He made his call too late. He called too late.


1

Sometimes if the negation is strong enough you can just juxtapose the sentences without needing a negating conjunction or preposition, e.g. He tried to call. It was too late. You can also do situation-specific rewordings, like Billy's suggestions above using "forgetting" and "anyway". Like Billy, though, I think you're probably more concerned about ...


1

I think that 'the privilege of serving people and improving their quality of life' could be condensed to 'Improving people's quality of life...' Or even 'Helping people and improving their quality of life'. It doesn't need the bit about privilege - it sounds a bit simpering or over the top. I also think that 'motivates me to' could sound more powerful as '...


1

Regaring your second question: Do these results guarantee that I confidently possess good English skills? My initial instinct was to say "probably yes". However, I was not sure if the methodology used by these readability grading techniques took word usage, grammar, and syntax into account. After all, someone could write long sentences with tons of grammar ...


1

So I might understand this in one reading, I would state the situation: There are 2 scenarios, 1 and 2. Each scenario has 2 variations, 1.1 and 1.2 for scenario 1, and, 2.1 and 2.2 for scenario 2. Variations 1.1 and 1.2 complement scenario 1, respectively the same as variations 2.1 and 2.2 complement scenario 2. So The number of people involved in ...


1

I can't really justify this with anything more than intuition, but for me, the second version, with Harry in her life, is clearer that Harry is the cause of Mayra's happiness. The first version says that Mayra lives with Harry, and that Mayra is happy about (at least some aspects of) her life, but doesn't attribute her happiness to Harry as explicitly.


1

"The Catholic Church exulted in its successes" is a proper sentence. Exult is also a somewhat archaic word. I doubt many people talk that way, but you are likely to find it in older texts and from certain academic styles of writing.


1

Whatever you do, please don't let anyone talk you into over-using the impersonal "one". When my Norwegian colleagues fell into that trap, I would ask them whether they were Queen Elizabeth II, explaining that, for the rest of us, it should not be used for autobiography, only for what it says on the tin, namely impersonals. For instance, I might say, "In ...


1

Let me explore, expand, and alter your assertions a bit. I've thrown in an introduction and conclusion in italics. In your intro, you state your thesis. Intro: In an essay, one's introduction, body, and conclusion differ in their approach toward your thesis. In your body, you state your problem and provide assertions that strengthen your thesis. You may ...


1

I'd just recast the sentence, so you don't have two of the same words appearing so closely together. "Twenty participants participated to the study, for which they received monetary compensation."


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