11 votes
Accepted

How to 'properly' turn the name 'Hardy' into an eponym? E.g. "Hardy-ian", "Hard-ian", "Hard-enian"

There is a famous writer named Thomas Hardy. The eponym for him is either Hardyan or Hardian. See Ngram. I'd suggest using which of these you prefer. Hardyan has a less usual ending, but it also makes ...
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9 votes

How to 'properly' turn the name 'Hardy' into an eponym? E.g. "Hardy-ian", "Hard-ian", "Hard-enian"

The traditional way of eponymisation in English is to first latinise the word and then form an eponym appending -ian or similar. For example, cf. Oxonian, Cantabrigian, Norwegian, Shavian, Harrovian, ...
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  • 4,181
7 votes

The proper word to denote the end of a count-off in the line in a PE class

No such thing. The question is based on a misapprehension about similarity between two cultures. In this case there is none. (And I suffered PE at an English Grammar School, in the days when such a ...
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  • 10.6k
5 votes
Accepted

Can repertoire be used with respect to a library's books?

'Repertoire' is used for performances, things that are repeated over and over by a performer (as opposed to a special performance of a single work). So it sounds strange to use with books (the author ...
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  • 69.1k
4 votes

Can repertoire be used with respect to a library's books?

The word repertoire, with its other variant repertory, did once have the meaning of an inventory. Etymonline explains: 1550s, "an index, list, catalogue," from Late Latin repertorium "...
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  • 15.8k
4 votes

‘It would be better dealt with’ VS. ‘It would better be dealt with’

The first one is idiomatic, the second isn't. This problem would be better dealt with by... means A better way of dealing with this problem would be to... You may be confusing the second with had ...
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  • 18.6k
3 votes

How to 'properly' turn the name 'Hardy' into an eponym? E.g. "Hardy-ian", "Hard-ian", "Hard-enian"

I've come across an example in a work on Fundamentals of Mathematical Evolutionary Genetics; Yuri M Svirezhev and Vladimir P Passekov (p 138): ... the Hardy-Weinberg Principle holds ... If (3.9b) ...
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3 votes

Scientific or science-based policy-making

This is the best I could find in a reasonable time, but I agree with the definition given by Glenn Geher at Psychology Today [typo corrected]: What does “science-based” mean? In the field of the ...
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2 votes

"Warning for exceptional heat" or should it be "temperature"?

Definitions may help in this case: temperature: Degree of hotness or coldness of a body or environment Cold: Sensation produced by low temperatures heat: Sensation produced by high temperatures ...
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  • 4,002
2 votes
Accepted

Is the following example of a phatic hiatus appropriate or is it misleading?

C.S. Lewis uses phatic hiatus to refer to the pause in speech after "In there, of course." In that sense, it is part of the example of a woman communicating. From the book: The female for ...
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2 votes

Which one is grammatically correct: "wood door" or "wooden door"

The preference as between wood and wooden varies in English writing depending on the noun being modified. This is perhaps most easily illustrated by looking at a series of Google Ngram charts that ...
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  • 152k
2 votes

What's the term for someone who is capable of producing a desired outcome but who just won't do it

There is the phrase can't be bothered to do something. Obviously not an adjective, but expresses what you describe. It means: be unwilling to make the effort needed to do something. (OxfordL) As an ...
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  • 15.8k
2 votes

Scientific or science-based policy-making

Yes, science-based is definitely a better term in this context, but not only because of the possible ambiguity noted in the last paragraph of the question. Scientific policy making can be taken to ...
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  • 6,798
2 votes

Is there a word for when others find a view or thing pretty/breathtaking but you feel nothing?

"Beauty is in the eye of the beholder" is a phrase that captures the notion that beauty is subjective and that different people may find different things beautiful. It's often used to "...
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2 votes

Is it "no matter the occasion" or "no matter what the occasion"?

The most common word after no matter the... is in fact cost, but it doesn't really make much difference which particular noun we look at - there's been a significant usage shift in recent decades... ...
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2 votes

What is a more concise expression of "did what she said she'd do"?

Keep one's word is an expression that means to fulfil one's promise I said I'd meet the deadline, and I kept my word. (Collins) You can also use be faithful/true to one's word doing what one said ...
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  • 15.8k
2 votes

Can repertoire be used with respect to a library's books?

Repertoire is borrowed from French. In that language it typically means folder (eg manila folder) directory (in a computer file system) collection (in the sense of your question) set (eg ...
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1 vote

Internationalism, globalism, transnationalism, or …?

There are a number of similar words, many of which are mentioned by the OP. However we can find differences in meaning and area of use. internationalism "international character, principles, ...
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  • 5,084
1 vote

Word for the texture of a weathered rock?

There are several words which you might apply to sharp rocks. jagged, ragged, serrated, saw-toothed, toothed, shredding. Or you might consider a descriptive phrase such as "like shark's teeth&...
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1 vote
Accepted

Word for the texture of a weathered rock?

There are a few. Scabrous may suit the case: rough to the touch: such as a: having small raised dots, scales, or points a scabrous leaf b: covered with raised, roughened, or unwholesome patches ...
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  • 8,403
1 vote

Is there a word for when others find a view or thing pretty/breathtaking but you feel nothing?

You can be underwhelmed by something. Lexico has underwhelm VERB humorous Fail to impress or make a positive impact on (someone); disappoint. Origin 1950s suggested by overwhelm.
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  • 16.1k
1 vote

What is the word for this context?

(OALD) index plural indices /ˈɪndɪsiːz/ a sign or measure that something else can be judged by • The number of new houses being built is a good index of a country's prosperity. • In the global ...
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  • 13.7k
1 vote

Scientific or science-based policy-making

Although scientific and science-based seem appropriate choices, I think to provide a broader concept, the Knowledge-based policy-making can be a good option.
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  • 5,268
1 vote

Scientific or science-based policy-making

Scientific policy making can be taken to imply that the policy has been determined by using the scientific method to consider the various factors involved. The Scientific Method can be applied to ...
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  • 10.6k
1 vote

Which one is grammatically correct: "wood door" or "wooden door"

You can say wood door, but wooden door is so much more common, as you can see in this Ngram, that I wouldn't bother to use the former. Both wood and wooden, when used as adjectives, can be said to be ...
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  • 15.8k
1 vote

Should I use "Discover" or "Uncover" in this specific instance?

The correct word, in my opinion, would be discovered. Subject: let's call him Columbus Another person: let's call him Sneaky Simon (cuz chipmunks -Alvin, Theodore, & Simon - like to bury and hoard ...
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