116

Short answer: Yes, of course English has future tense ... for everyone except the most technical, and for them it doesn't have a future tense because they define "have a tense" in a non-intuitive way. So you can go ahead and say confidently that English has future tense. Longer answer: Most everybody (within the monolingual English speaking community) ...


47

Like any perfect couple, you're both partially right. Assuming August is in the future, you could say: We will have been together for three years in August. The first sentence (We would have been together...) implies that your relationship was in the past (i.e. that you're no longer together), and it could also mean that August was in the past. ...


47

Strictly speaking, no Germanic language has a future tense, only a present and a preterite. All others are analytic tenses compounded with various auxiliaries. Since the present tense simple in English, unlike in other modern Germanic languages, is never used to describe what's happening right now, perhaps it would be better to call it the non-past. The ...


15

There's no formal future tense in English, although the future may be referred to by using will. "I will go tomorrow" expresses at least an intention; but that can also be expressed by "I am going tomorrow" or even "I go tomorrow". british-english [What follows may not apply to other versions] While (= "at the same time as&...


11

Your belief is incorrect. "I will do my homework tomorrow" is not a contracted form, and there is no historical "uncontracted" form which matches your assumption. See Wikipedia entries on future tense and the English use of shall and will "Will" is an auxiliary verb, which is used to transform other verbs into the necessary tense. Other European ...


9

Allow me to cite an excerpt from an answer posted back in November 13, 2012. The Original Post is entitled How many tenses are there in English? What is a tense? In linguistic terminology, "tense" is a part of verbal paradigm that refers specifically to the time of an utterance. It is impossible for any language to have more than three tenses in ...


8

"Are you going?" is the more natural British English usage when you are simply asking about plans or intent. "Will you go" works too, but sounds a bit clunky. "Will you...?" is also the way you might ask someone to do something, rather than just asking about their plans - as in "please go...."


7

"I will do my homework tomorrow" is future tense. The fact that there is a homonym of "will" that means "intention" is irrelevant. That's not the word that we're using here. We're using the word that indicates that indicates future tense. The word "fast" can mean, "to go without eating", but that doesn't make the sentence, "Bob runs fast" nonsensical. That's ...


6

In Shakespeare, shall and will were not used according to the "traditional rule in Standard British English" described in your link. You can see from this Ngram that there was a big change in the rules for shall and will between 1600 and 1700, at least for first person. Since the comments say this line was composed around 1600, the grammar would ...


5

There is a thing called sub-ordinate clauses in English. It is used to provide information that is slightly off topic, and you could pretend the sentence is without it and it will mean the same thing For example: John, who was tall, touched the ceiling is the same as: John touched the ceiling In this scenario, the author is saying that you will ...


3

Your rearrangement of the sentence is correct. The author inverted the sentence by starting with the subject of the sub-clause and added the main clause in commas (hence the commas). This avoids the double "that" resulting from the sub-clause and the reported speech ("B. said that...) within it. It also places more emphasis on Bentham as the subject, since ...


3

In some situations will and shall may point to different sources of motivation to act in a particular way—namely, an internal source versus an external source. As an example (in the third-person singular) of the compulsory aspect of shall versus the volitional aspect of will, consider this exchange from Henry James's short story "Covering End": “...


3

As a native AusEng speaker these two sentences are very similar in meaning, but I think there is a slight pragmatic difference. This answer represents my intuition as to what that difference is, and I welcome feedback on it. I should first note that I am considering only a neutral intonation. If for example the word you was stressed (to contrast with ...


3

Hope is a concept related to expectations and desires for the future, so most expressions of hope are about the future whenever present or future tense is used. The statements "I hope for a bit more from the new player", "I am hoping for a bit more from the new player", "I will hope for a bit more from the new player" and "...


3

There are two possible meanings here, and the differences are subtle. If the person making the statement is essentially setting a schedule, "will" would not be used. "While the engineers give a press conference, the inspection team will investigate the accident scene." That is, the engineers will give a press conference at the same time ...


3

Live /laɪv/ is an adjective, not a verb, regardless of the tense of the sentence where it occurs. So, you will be live? This uses the be + adjective construction. You can't omit be any more than you can omit it before any other adjective. For example, we say "The moon is bright tonight", "The moon will be bright tonight", "Will the ...


2

English, unlike many languages, doesn't have a true future tense. We can use the present tense to indicate the future if the context makes it clear. Alternatively we can use the auxiliary verb, 'will'. Originally 'to will' meant to wish or to intend something to happen. Nowadays it can still have that sense but more often it simply indicates future events. ...


2

Although it was the huge bounty that drew my attention to this question (as intended by the member who placed the bounty) I am not at all sure that we can assume there is a difference in meaning between 'are you going' and 'will you go' here, simply because OP asks, "what is the difference?" What if somebody were to ask, What is the difference ...


2

This author is a bit long-winded, but this is an acceptable construction. Alternatives include "Bentham, remember, says..." or just plain "Bentham says..." . These subordinate clauses are common in speech as a way to give either the speaker time to organize his thoughts or the listener to absorb them.


2

I would not say "what if we will get ... ". I use "will" in protasis of a conditional only if it means "be willing to" or "be obstinate/foolhardy enough to". I would say that as "What if we get ...", or "What if we do get ... " for emphasis.


2

They both mean the same thing, and they're both correct. Also see: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shall_and_will


2

Welcome to the site. Your post is a model of how to ask good questions! As to the answer: The book is correct in that holidays generally need to be arranged, but packing typically does not - unless, for example, you decide on a time with your spouse or a friend to do so. Arranged in the context of future events generally includes: a meeting time has been ...


2

(1b) Fruit keeps longer in the fridge is a general statement of a universal (under normal circumstances) fact, a middlle voice usage. cf Ice melts at 273K. (1a) Fruit will keep longer in the fridge may be used as a replacement for (1b) with precisely the same meaning, or as a mild incentive/corrective to someone leaving it out of the fridge. ........... (...


2

The construction "going to" is very common in those situations where "about to" can also be used. The car's about to crash! --->It's going to crash! (YES) It will crash (YES but it has slightly less urgency.) I'm about to announce the winner ---> I'm going to announce the winner. (YES) I will announce the winner (YES but it has slightly less urgency) We ...


2

In this construction, the purpose of the progressive is to ensure that the question is not understood as a request; it 'softens' it, as it were. Discussion Here is a relevant section of CGEL (pp. 171-172): Will + progressive [22]  i  When we get there, they'll probably still be having lunch.       [aspectual meaning]          ii  Will you be going to the ...


1

English, like other languages, uses tense semiotically as well as semantically. Thus, when context clearly establishes the time in question, we can use tense to signal something about the focus of our remarks. The so-called historical present is an example. I have found no discussion of the historical present being used to bring the future into tighter ...


1

I understand what you mean with the sentence but it took me some effort. My choice would be: "It lacks exact references to the book, something about argumentative analysis I would come to learn later in the course." This tense is called a conditional perfect and is described as "something that might have happened in the past but had not happened at that ...


1

According to the Cambridge Dictionary it is future perfect simple, and is entirely acceptable. The reason for this is that future perfect simple is constructed will/shall + have + the -ed form of the verb which corresponds to [I] will have come [to learn]


1

This is perfectly normal colloquial English. Your difficulty is that the so-called "future tense" is only one way of conveying future time in English. (I belong to the party of linguists who don't believe that English has a future tense, but we don't need to get into that). Clauses beginning with subordinating conjunctions such as "if", &...


1

Well, yes and no. First of all, whether English has or doesn't have future tense doesn't affect its ability to clearly express future, in a manner you have pointed out (I shall also add "I am meeting them on Monday" as a third method of expressing future). From there on it depends on how you define tenses. It is correct that English doesn't express ...


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