18 votes
Accepted

What is the difference between "hallmark" and "trappings"?

One key difference between the two words in the meaning you've posed is expected number in usage: hallmark is usually singular trappings is usually plural The hallmark (OED, "hallmark, n." ...
18 votes

Is there any difference between "congenial" and "genial"?

A genial person is pleasant and friendly in their behaviour. Because of this, you will probably find them congenial [to you]. As you see from the definition you found, congenial always has the sense ...
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  • 18.5k
17 votes

What is the difference between "hallmark" and "trappings"?

The origins of the terms points to a significant connotational difference. Hallmark: "early 18th century (as a noun): from Goldsmiths' Hall in London, where articles were tested and stamped with ...
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  • 351
16 votes
Accepted

Is the word "chum" to mean friend a common word?

To take your questions in order, starting from the title question: It's not very common. In text, since 1960, 'Pal', 'buddy', and 'chum' all stay relatively very low until 1990, but then 'buddy' ...
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  • 69.1k
11 votes

What is the difference between "hallmark" and "trappings"?

You could think of it this way: hallmarks are the aspects that make someone fit a classic, respected stereotype; trappings are superficial aspects that we notice in a detached, skeptical way. We are ...
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  • 21.2k
9 votes
Accepted

Is it "increase" or "expand" when talking about vocabulary?

The most common expression is to improve one's vocabulary. But as you can see in this Ngram, both your son's and your expressions are used and with almost equal frequency. So I wouldn't argue too much ...
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  • 15.7k
8 votes

Is out building universally used?

It's usually written as one word, outbuilding. As the dictionary link suggests, it is certainly used and understood in the UK, and would not be considered to be an Americanism or unusual.
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  • 14.8k
7 votes

Is there any difference between "congenial" and "genial"?

Is there any difference between "congenial" and "genial"? Yes. The sources below cover the subtle difference(s) between the two words: From The Oxford Dictionary of American Usage ...
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  • 10k
6 votes

Is out building universally used?

According to Collins dictionary, it is used in British English (note that it's a single word): outbuilding in British English NOUN a building subordinate to but separate from a main building; ...
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  • 10k
6 votes

What is the most suitable antonym for the word loud?

Antonym is a concept that's widely misunderstood. It involves negation, always a slippery concept, and supposes that there are pairs of opposed words X and Y, where X means not Y, and Y means not X. ...
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5 votes

Phonetic symbols for Port are different: Webster Internet vs Webster paper

The Merriam-Webster Learner's dictionary is using IPA, which is the international standard for phonetic notation. The Merriam-Webster online dictionary uses Merriam-Webster's own phonetic symbols, ...
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4 votes

Can we use Pindrop instead of Pindrop silence in a sentence?

I'm not familiar with "pindrop" as a single word, but there is a dictionary entry for the phrase "pindrop silence," including having "pindrop" as a single word. It is ...
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  • 5,613
4 votes
Accepted

Hobbes spelling inconsistency

By the point this was originally published in 1651, English had already come so far from its Middle English days: most of the words are spelled the same, even between different books and different ...
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  • 58.7k
4 votes

Ameliorate example sentences

None of your examples seem idiomatic to me. The subject of "ameliorate" is usually a bad condition or situation, not a specific thing. There are a number of examples in Lexico that show ...
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4 votes
Accepted

Meaning of mount in software engineering

Mount in this (IT) context is a technical word meaning to make the local folder available to the computer, so that appears to be within the docker container. In IT the word comes from when a disk or a ...
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  • 2,333
4 votes

"run the wickets of"

It's not correct. Read the rules of сroquet. You have to pass all the wickets to win. So idiomatically, it means more "do something step by step", not swift progress. You still have to run ...
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  • 41
4 votes
Accepted

Does the usage of the word 'absenteeism' in relation to COVID match with the standard usage of the word?

Cambridge Dictionary [adjusted] first lists the default stipulative meaning of the word: absenteeism [noun] [non-count]: a situation in which people are not at school or work when they should be ...
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4 votes

Is there any difference between "congenial" and "genial"?

Harry Shaw, Dictionary of Problem Words and Phrases (1975) offers this brief discussion of how the two terms differ: congenial, genial. Congenial means "compatible," "allied in spirit, ...
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  • 152k
3 votes

Looking for a word that describes a text as ‘having too much useless information’

Suggested sentences: You have a good piece of writing about 300 words in length, but you've padded it (out) with another 200 words of fluff to meet a requirement of the assignment. or You have 300 ...
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  • 17.4k
3 votes

What are the technical symbols used in the margin of a page called?

The passage from Eusebius you refer to in your question, is, strangely enough, the item used to illustrate my reference for this answer. According to Mariken Teeuwen items that express approval or ...
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2 votes

"you may find yourself facing a hard, if meaningful, path" What does "if meaningful" mean in this context?

I think the word choice presented is not clear, but I believe "if meaningful" is intended to acknowledge that the difficulty of the task may be justified because the goal may be meaningful ...
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  • 135
2 votes

Looking for a word that describes a text as ‘having too much useless information’

In the absence of a sample sentence where the word should appear, here are some possibilities (from Merriam-Webster): wordy, verbose, prolix, diffuse mean using more words than necessary to express ...
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2 votes

A word for being willing to accept the decisions and/or actions of machines

The OP's mention of willingly accept, distrust, no alternative or escape, and submission to machines leads me to: acquiesce To accept, comply, or submit tacitly or passively -- often used with in or ...
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  • 17.4k
2 votes

Looking for a word that describes a text as ‘having too much useless information’

Although I am almost entirely ignorant of Russian, from what I am lead to believe, something scurrilous or slightly vulgar might be most appropriate to a negative expression. In which case, there ...
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  • 10.6k
2 votes

Is the word "palaver" in common use anywhere in the English-speaking world?

In Southern Nigeria, the word 'palaver' is used quite often; although with a very distinct Nigerian pronunciation and in the context of local colloquialisms. In Nigeria (where many old english words ...
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2 votes

Modern usage of the word 'hearken'

As far as I'm aware the transitive use of hearken uses the sound or sound source as the object: Hearken the birdsong! So the first option, "Such an experience hearkens one’s ear to...", is ...
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  • 5,613
2 votes
Accepted

Does "multiple" have a special meaning within the context of industry?

It's not an industry definition, but an investing or stock market definition: multiple is short for "price to earnings multiple" (also commonly referred to as the "P/E ratio"). As ...
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  • 58.7k
2 votes
Accepted

Phonetic symbols for Port are different: Webster Internet vs Webster paper

Of course they are. Different dictionaries use different notations because they're aimed at different groups of users. If you look up the pronunciation key of each dictionary, i.e. this and this, you ...
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  • 1,442
2 votes

What is the difference between "hallmark" and "trappings"?

I would say that a hallmark is how you distinguish the real thing from something fake: the hallmark of a gentleman is his courtesy to others. Trappings are superficial and can be misleading: gentlemen ...
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1 vote

What do we call a specific place we visit with a specific person?

Rendezvous /ˈrɒn.deɪ.vuː/ a place where a particular group of people often go or meet, by arrangement or habit:
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