3

It obviously sounds odd to say "he has a lot of great features." I disagree about "feature" being odd, especially when it is used in reference to physical characteristics like eye color or shape of nose. But can we use the word "traits" instead? Absolutely. "He has a lot of great traits" is perfectly natural sounding. And what if we say "he has a ...


3

Following up on @Kate Bunting's comment, sunset is often used in government to describe laws that are intended to stay in effect for a certain period of time and then expire. For example: "The legislature imposed a surcharge on the corporate tax in year x that was scheduled to sunset in year y." When used in this context, sunset can be used as a noun, an ...


3

You could say something like "the sun has set on their friendship" as a slightly whimsical and poetic metaphor, once the situation is in the past. The use of the noun "setting" implies a prediction of something which will occur, and does not really work in a metaphorical sense.


2

Yes, it's perfectly permissible to put the subject's name at the beginning of the sentence in order to emphasise it. However, you don't need to include he, just another comma. The sentence is "Oussama does it" - the phrase "when he wants to do something," specifies when he does it.


1

I agree with you. I add that there are many possible approaches to a problem, whether or not a solution exists.


1

TL;DR It depends. There's no good exact answer for the number of words in any language for several reasons. You may or may not count different meanings of the same spelling as a different word. But supposing you do (for implementation purposes I would), there's still a question of how different a meaning counts (like a repeated metaphorical usage). eg ...


1

I think this is what you were trying to say. My edits are in caps: The bar chart presents the number of maleS and femaleS who did regular activity in Australia in 2010. The information, CATEGORIZED according TO six different age groups by gender, is REPORTED (USE 'REPORTED' INSTEAD OF ILLUSTRATED?) in percentages.


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