Questions tagged [verbs]

This tag is for questions about verbs. Verbs are words that express an action, occurrence, or a state of being. Add this tag to single-word-requests if you are looking for a verb. Add the tag word-usage if you are asking about the usage of the verb.

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1answer
48 views

A verb for "be the most important"

Contexts: Personalized news recommendation plays a big role in helping users acquire their interested information. It consists of two major steps: recall and ranking, in both of which efficiency is ...
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0answers
30 views

What is the meaning of "screwing someone"? [closed]

I think this is an informal phrase. I was watching a movie where a woman asks his husband "So you were gonna beat me because I'm screwing someone else?" I think it refers to her sleeping or ...
6
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1answer
487 views

Verb for thing bouncing in your hand before falling

Looking for a verb that describes the action that sometimes precedes a thing falling from your hands. It looks like juggling or bouncing, but I’m not sure if those words fit in the following context: “...
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0answers
53 views

Could "being" be omitted in "spend time (being) someone"?

I came across a sentence in Maugham's The Moon and Sixpence that I don't quite comprehend: They may spend their whole lives aliens among their kindred, and remain aloof among the only scenes they ...
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0answers
31 views

What does it means "to use an ice cream"? [duplicate]

I heard this expression some days ago at work and couldn't understand what it means. Two people in a conversation, talking about how bored they were on a Friday, then the guy just said I could use an ...
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1answer
27 views

What is the proper way to say "14 Registered Students"? [closed]

Which should it be? "14 Registered Students" or "14 Students Registered"
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1answer
38 views

Does "to help" only have indirect object without having a direct object?

there. I stumbled upon this sentence: The charity gave them money to help them purchase a house. While trying to analyse it, I met some problems related to the verb "to help". My first ...
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1answer
25 views

Does the verb have to be conjugated for a sentence to be considered complete?

I was filling out a description box for a potential meeting with a contact, & I went to type the sentence: "To have a follow up conversation about ____'s guest lecture." Would that be ...
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0answers
30 views

Multiple errors found VS multiple errors were found [duplicate]

I'm writing a website where people can enter data and I want to show an error message if the data is incorrect. I am debating whether the error should be "multiple errors found" or "...
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35 views

Glamourisation/Glamorisation/Glamorization?

I ran into a problem whilst writing the word 'glamourisation'. I want to adhere to the British spelling, which I think would be with and but the Oxford English Dictionary has no entry for '...
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0answers
19 views

What is the word class of "studying" in "studying hard is the key to success"?

This has caused some debate amongst myself and some others. The two claims are that in "studying hard is the key to success", that "studying" is either (1) a noun (gerund) or (2) a ...
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2answers
59 views

Does 'develop' in "In Chapter 2 we develop essential aspects of elliptic curve cryptography." strike you as not the right word? [closed]

The quote in question comes from the Introduction, page 12, to this book: In our quest for comprehensiveness, we have chosen to present all the basic elements of cryptography needed to understand the ...
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44 views

Verbs to describe someone's eye movement when they suddenly notice something

I'm trying to describe a situation arising when two people are having a conversation. Suddenly one of them notices a phrase said by the other, and he keeps it in mind without making any remark about ...
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1answer
44 views

What's the meaning of "scrambled up"?

I read a letter in which one professor wrote that he was scrambled up a very steep learning curve to understand nature of his new work. If the professor was qualified for the new job why he scrambled ...
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1answer
1k views

Can the word "rook" be used as a verb in chess?

According to Merriam-Webster, the word queen can be used as a verb with the meaning "to become a queen in chess". I am wondering if the work rook can be used in the same way: Is it ...
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0answers
30 views

Do these sentence have adjective of verb 3 instead of passive simple present tense (buried, closed, defeated, published)?

Most of my family are buried near my home. The case is dismissed. I am defeated. Nothing left to look forward to and nothing left to hold on to. Your first question is published. What I have realized ...
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1answer
29 views

Which one is correct "they didn't" or "they don't" when using "for" afterwards [closed]

I'm confused whether I should use "didn't" or "don't" in the following sentence: Makki and Mattsun didn't have time to execute their plan, for two not-so-soon-expected guests are ...
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2answers
51 views

Verb misuse question

I've come across a few references in written and spoken American English along the lines of "She feared him into staying home," or, "The new development feared them to upgrade their ...
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1answer
79 views

What is the difference between "Make" and "Get" when they come with an adjective?

I see that people use both of them, but are there any differences between them? what do they mean exactly? For instance: I got him upset. I made him upset.
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3answers
83 views

Is there a verb that means "to make someone feel special"?

Is there a verb that means "to make someone feel special"? I've used that same phrase one too many times in the same piece and would love to mix it up! For example: "On your child's ...
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2answers
26 views

Is "Inequality (1) infers" correct? (as in "Inequality (1) holds/follows")

I'm aware verbs like "hold" or "follow" can be used in the following way: Inequality (1) holds. Inequality (2) follows from the fact that... However, I've recently seen the verb &...
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2answers
44 views

"The received size" vs "The size of the received data"? [closed]

I know The size of the received data is a correct phrase. I just wonder: Can I use the shorter and concise form: The received size? Is it grammatically correct? Will a native speaker think it natural?
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3answers
84 views

Doing Something with Alacrity?

Is there any particular verb, slang term, or idiom to mean "doing something with alacrity"?
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0answers
25 views

How long have you been married (for)? [duplicate]

Is there a difference between the following sentences? How long have you been married? How long have you been married for?
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1answer
33 views

Can "Pend" be used as a transitive verb? [closed]

I found myself writing a sentence as follows: I will pend the investigation for now. Only to realise that I wasn't sure if it was appropriate to use pend as a verb in this sense. While not a logical ...
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1answer
50 views

A verb to describe defensive behavior/action in an attempt to deny embarrassment

I am looking for a verb/term to describe someone's aggressive argument with twisted logic in an attempt to cover up his/her embarrassment arising from his/her mistake. Similar to projecting. Are there ...
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0answers
22 views

are some prepositions (e.g. “concerning”) actually just irregular passive forms of verbs (e.g. “to concern” )

Trying to understand the roles prepositions play. It seems to me that as well as the obvious positional information they express (in, on, under etc) they also serve as passive forms of some verbs. ...
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1answer
68 views

You can "allocate the slot S for X", but what's a verb V that will work in a sentence such as "Please V X into the slot S"?

In "Please V X into the slot S", the word order is such that V immediately precedes S, and the preposition into is then used. That's what I need. Clearly you can put or insert X into slot ...
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1answer
48 views

Is "cumbers" a word? [closed]

I'm looking for a slogan for my new website (https://numbr.dev, online calculator with support for currencies). And thought of this slogan: Numbers are no longer cumbers. Does it make sense? And is &...
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0answers
25 views

Indirect Question [grammar]

I was reviewing this article and had a question about some minor grammar issues. The whole sentence is "The current work attempts to solve this gap in CE knowledge by investigating how security ...
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1answer
100 views

Take advice vs follow advice

To take advice is usually defined as: obtain information and guidance, typically from an expert. Lexico By this definition, there is no implication that the advice is actually followed. But can take ...
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1answer
47 views

Is exponentiate a valid verb tense of exponentiation?

'Exponentiate' seems to fail spell checks and it doesn't appear to be valid in any official dictionaries that I can see. Though I do I see it used from time to time and see it in questionable "...
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0answers
23 views

Sentence formation [duplicate]

Why in many sentences do we use verbs before pronouns such as we write in a question? For example: Neither did I try nor did I want to. She told me that I can improve my grades, and boy was she right....
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2answers
120 views

Sentence structure of hoax and dupe

Is this sentence structure available for the two verbs? hoax somebody out of something dupe somebody out of something
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1answer
28 views

Using Raised or Rose in different contexts? [closed]

You use raised in some situations, like I raised my hand but in other situations, I rose early in the morning you use rose. Is there a common rules for using rose or raised?
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1answer
87 views

Any precedent for the word "storn"?

When reading an article on programming languages this morning, I came across this interesting verb formation (emphasis mine): Any Brainfuck program can be easily converted to Boolfuck. The process is ...
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1answer
86 views

"prepare" vs "do" vs "make": how to know when to use which in the "get something ready" sense

This is probably a rather abstruse question about the usage of "prepare"; I haven't been able to find any resources that clearly demonstrate or explain the difference in distributions of the ...
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1answer
39 views

-ING verbs referring to the process of an action? [duplicate]

In the following sentence, just like we may use in everyday English, "I enjoy playing the piano", is it virtually the same to say "I enjoy to play the piano"? Particularly, what I ...
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2answers
100 views

Does "unnerve" mean "to make nervous"? If not, what are some verbs for "to make nervous"?

I'm confused by the word "unnerve" which sounds like it might mean "to make nervous," but seems to actually mean, "to emasculate or weaken." So what would be some words ...
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0answers
30 views

Are all verbs imperative? [closed]

It seems that all basic verbs can be considered imperative verbs. Can someone point me to a counter-example?
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0answers
36 views

cotton-top tamarins also spend most of their lives in the trees. My question is about why not most of their live ? why lives? [duplicate]

I don't understand (most of their lives) is singular or plural ? what make this sentence singular for what reason ?
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2answers
76 views

Does the verb 'deliver' make sense in this sentence? [closed]

We are going to deliver this meeting. Not sure if the verb 'deliver' is used correctly in this sentence. If not what alternative words can I use?
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1answer
50 views

Verb for mathematical induction [closed]

The development of mathematics unfortunately chose "induction" as a name for a proof technique -- mathematical induction is not inductive, but a kind of deductive reasoning! I have seen in ...
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0answers
23 views

That Grow or That Grows [duplicate]

The pineapple, a fruit THAT GROWS in tropical climates throughout the world, is native to parts of South America. OR The pineapple, a fruit THAT GROW in tropical climates throughout the world, is ...
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0answers
35 views

Word order in declarative statements

In these examples, why does the first sentence feel uncomfortable, compared to the second? It's fascinating to use this camera to see how will be the back of my garden. It's fascinating to use this ...
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0answers
51 views

Talk of the town be true [closed]

“Oh I see what she do But I can do it better And the talk of the town be true That I'll make you forget her” (And as follows: «How can you hate something that you ain't ever tried / You've got to lose ...
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1answer
32 views

Can always or Always can [closed]

I am struggling with the order of "can" and "always" in those two sentences: One way to illustrate this problem is by imagining a finite number of mathematical points and noting ...
2
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1answer
116 views

Just 'carry' for 'carry weapons' and just 'lift' instead of 'lift weights'. What linguistic phenomenon is it?

There are English verbs that can be used without an object while meaning a certain object. E.g. Carry = carry weapons Lift = lift weights Use = use drugs Possibly, ‘investigate’ (an incident, a crime,...
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2answers
33 views

How to say: work (in/at/on/?) your hours

My intention is to let a person (i.e. my employee), whom I'm talking to, to choose his/her work hours. For example: Employee: I'm going to do this task between 1-4 pm today. Me: Sure, no problem. Work ...
3
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3answers
115 views

Origin of the English word chevel

I'm originally from Yorkshire and my family, especially my mum, used the verb 'chevel', in the context of "you're always cheveling sweets". I don't know what the exact spelling was. Does ...

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