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22

The line is from a 50s rock n roll song. You can watch Bill Haley and the Comets performing this little ditty on Youtube See you later, Aligator It was a catchy line and it caught on in popularity, and I'd say it resisted until the late 60s until it gradually declined in usage. Ironically, this form of greeting is seen as being quaint and/or painfully "...


10

The comma is the only acceptable punctuation to place after the valediction: Sincerely, John Doe This is because the period is only necessary at the end of a sentence or abbreviation. The comma, on the other hand, usually separates related phrases within a sentence. In this case, the context is not a sentence (Sincerely, John Doe), but convention has ...


10

There's a difference between a complete, grammatically-correct sentence and a greeting. If I was writing a complete sentence, I would write "I wish you a merry Christmas and a happy New Year." But if I was just greeting someone, I'd say, "Merry Christmas!", not "A Merry Christmas". It's like when you write a title or a headline, you often leave out words, ...


10

I'm from the UK and I personally use 'Regards' on its own, like you. Even to somebody I don't know. That's usually for the initial contact type of email, when I'm first raising a subject with somebody. Subsequent responses tend to become less formal, with either a simple 'Thanks' or no ending at all. However, from your list above, I most often see 'Kind ...


8

"Goodbye" is derived from God be with you, as are many valedictions. "Take care" is sort of threadbare. "Farewell" seems antiquated. "Bon Voyage" is great if you're French. Be well, good fortune, until we meet again I do like the Vulcan Valediction, live long and prosper. Namaste is very respectful. It is spiritual, however; it can be interpreted (roughly)...


7

As far as I know, the expression comes from a song by Bill Haley and the Comets, one of the earliest rock and roll groups, in which the chorus included the words: See you later alligator After 'while crocodile To use it now, as I’m sure some do, seems very dated, unless, of course, it is done in a spirit of irony.


7

"Greetings", by definition, should only be at the beginning of a letter. "Wishes", on the other hand, can go at the end :-) Something I write often is "best wishes from [wherever I'm currently at, if I'm on vacation]" - and such a structure is definitely appropriate at the end of a letter. That said, Jon is also correct that sometimes mentioning where you ...


6

When I was a kid, my grandfather used to say this to my brother and I when we left his house. He would say, "See you later, alligator" and we would say "After awhile, crocodile!" and then he would come back with "By the light of the moon, racoon!", a phrase he just added on. We were little kids, so that always got us. We could never come up with "Gotta go,...


6

Use “we remain” in a participial closing¹. It provides the object (we) of the preceding participial phrase. Here is an example of correct usage. I have added a sample participial phrase, and removed the comma after “remain”. Letter text. Hoping this banal participial closing causes no offense, we remain Sincerely yours, Mr Person Head ...


6

If the valediction ends with a noun, then the s is omitted, as in: Your obedient and humble servant, Your friend, If the phrase uses an adverb, then yours is used: Yours truly, Sincerely yours, Yours forever, There's nothing tricky about this; just think about how you'd say the full sentence, if it began with “I am...” I am your closest ...


5

In the US military, we use Respectfully and Very Respectfully or even Hooah!. I use Respectfully when I am closing a formal letter to a peer. I also use Respectfully in any letter which might otherwise be considered informal, but in which I append my rank to my name, because the fact that I'm writing in my military capacity alone makes it formal in a sense, ...


5

Entirely up to you! "Regards" is the most formal, "Best regards" the least formal, and "With Regards" somewhere in between.


5

While I agree with most of what WS2 says, they have not answered your specific question, which is about whether Have a good day is limited to the morning. And the answer is No, it is not. If you use it, you can use it any time of the day, though probably not when it is getting dark. And contra WS2, who has assumed you are using the phrase with a stranger ...


5

Nowadays people tend to separate the formal closing (or subscription) of a letter from flow of the preceding main text of the letter. But it was not always thus. In the 18th and 19th centuries, many letter writers tried to move relatively seamlessly from their message to their farewell. Thus we have numerous examples where "yours truly" appears as part of a ...


5

I'm a native English speaker, and I have never encountered it. Maybe that is because I'm a Brit. "My thoughts are/will be with you" is far more common with us. To my mind, your thoughts going my way sounds more like philosophical agreement than sympathy. Valediction, you said: no way, it's just not British.


4

I frequently use 'Best Regards' ... ...and I am a native speaker of American English. The following is my personal opinion, but I've been told I'm pretty smart. ;-) Best Regards - I find to be just right for people you like, but don't know that well, as in, most co-workers, salespeople, vendors, etc. Best Wishes - Too floral for my taste when dealing with ...


3

I don't believe that it's odd, no. It may sound foreign to American ears, but, for the British, this type of succinctness is very common.


3

As with most things, it depends on the context. Any of your three options are essentially short for the more complete thought, "I send this letter with my regards." You have to ask yourself, does "sending regards" actually make sense in the context of your business position? One would typically use this phrase for long-distance communication, as they are "...


3

When concerned about propriety, treat an email as you would a classic business letter. (I'm assuming a US English speaking recipient). "Yours faithfully" if you don't know their name. "Yours sincerely" if you do. Here is a decent guide to business letter writing, and the same rules apply to both email and traditional mail.


3

Nos. 1 and 7 are informal, but certainly not rude. I wouldn't use those shortened forms with people I didn't know very well, but they work nicely with close acquaintances, when more formal options like #3 and #11 begin to sound awkward. No. 8 is rather formal and perhaps old-fashioned, and could be too much, but I don't think anyone would be put off by it....


3

I was taught to use "Sincerely Yours" and "Very Truly Yours", which I always thought was too intimate-sounding for business but it was de rigueur back in the 1960s and 1970s. I have seen "Yours" used more and more in recent times and seems quite ordinary and acceptable to my Midwest US, middle-aged eyes and sensibilities. :-)


3

Email is not subject to normal punctuation conventions. It's probably just a personal idiosyncracy, like putting a hyphen before a signature initial. -j


3

I often leave off the "Dear" in such circumstances: Mr Smith: In regards to our previous conversation... Moreover, if Mr. Smith has signed one of his emails to me in a manner such as this: Best regards, Jeff Jeff Smith President, EL&U Inc. Then I might take that as a cue, and I may take the liberty of beginning subsequent emails ...


3

You should capitalize only the first word in salutation, as in Dear Mr. X My dear Mr. X and also, only the first word of closing Sincerely Very truly yours


3

I've been using this phrase a lot recently. My Mother, aged 92 with advanced Alzheimer's. When there was almost nothing else left we'd say "See you later!" she'd say "Alligator! In a while... a Crocodile!" Aside from that I've not heard it used in 50 years. She died this morning. The last thing I said to her was "see you later alligator" and gave her a ...


3

There are many expressions of felicitations, to wish happiness, congratulations, longevity, success, or encouragement, that can be found in common use and that don't invoke a religious sentiment. I found this link, which seems to illustrate quite a few, some of which I quote here: May you see your children's children. May you be poor in misfortunes ...


3

Thank you, same to you is appropriate if someone is taking a vacation at the same time as you are. It is, in English, polite, understood to be appreciative, and adequate as a response. To say more is not common in English. However cultures vary, and if your culture supports that style, then Thank you! Now that you've wished me well, I'm sure it will ...


3

In English it would be more common to put such a greeting at the beginning of an email as the salutation, rather than in the valediction at the end. A greeting from a particular place while travelling wouldn't be unheard of, but would read more like a postscript, as in you just remembered you should offer a greeting from where you are, than a normal ...


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