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The conjugation of the verb "to be" is: I am thou art (archaic) you (singular) are he/she is we are you (plural) are they are From this viewpoint, the use of "I are" is neither a matter of usage nor of choice. It is simply wrong.


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No, it's not common usage in older English. I think it's a misprint. The 1888 edition has "I am enormously anxious to finish my night at the Duke of Bracciano’s.” If it isn't a misprint it could conceivably be a device of the translator's, to portray the speaker as affected (artificial, pretentious). In French, 'Je sommes' certainly has its uses. ...


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Thanks for the question. Morning technically begins at sunrise, which can vary by location and time of year. Sunrise signifies the start of a new day. It is technically correct to say 'see you tomorrow' after midnight, and mean that you will see that person after sunrise. The word morrow means morning, and tomorrow means at morningtime, or the next daytime. ...


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Adverbs of frequency (always) are rarely used in the continuous tense. It is preferred to use simple tenses instead. So, instead of Present Perfect Continuous, I would choose Present Perfect Simple. But since "It has always happened" would not address what you mean, the fact that something has always been the trend, I would choose Present Simple. ...


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The term "founder" is the most appropriate gender-neutral term for "founding father". This and other gender-inclusive terminology can be found in Boston University's guidelines for inclusive language available here.


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While it is true that discard is a verb with positive action, it can be argued that a figure can commit the act. In philosophy and language, a speech act is information given by a speaker or writer that not only expresses ideas, but performs an action. A Wikipedia article on the subject attributes Speech-Act theory to Wittgenstein's philosophical theories. ...


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"John's corporate seal logo for his company has a literal seal on it” is not idiomatic; “an actual seal on it” as far preferable. “Literal” = “within the true meaning (or dictionary definition) of the word” – however “seal” has several “true meanings” – it can refer to several sorts of seal – they can be of a metal/plastic/paper/printed ink, etc. or, of ...


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'Got it,' 'I got that' and (especially in the US) 'I got it' are all varied forms, the first involving conversational deletion, of 'Understood' or 'I've taken that on board.' This has been covered before and can be easily checked in a dictionary. But the other sense of 'I got it' / 'Got it' (I'd agree with @Dan that they're largely synonymous in both senses) ...


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"Be it" is the present subjunctive third-person singular of the verb "to be." It is the same in every person, and in both singular and plural: I be you be he/she/it/one be we be you be they be The present subjunctive is perfectly correctly (but now unusually) used following "if" or "whether," but it is still commonly ...


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Throughout my life, I have heard many people say eg “It’s nigh-on ten years since ......” and I’ve never considered it odd. Nigh-on does not appear to be so uncommon in this context.


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There's nothing wrong with the sentences. It is rather an extension of usage. [sic] can mean that something is not correct in a quote (typo etc) but you could also use it to emphasize some peculiarity of the quoted text (e.g. contradictory or dubious assertions or a value that deviates heavily from the norm). By using [sic] you normally want to express that ...


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Nice answer from "bib", and I agree in the context of Manufacturing. In Sales, a different set of definitions may be more appropriate: Product - something you sell or deliver to a customer e.g. A Tin of Beans Material - something you buy or assemble to make the Product e.g. Tin of Beans consists of Tin, Label and Foodstuff. Foodstuff consists of ...


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I The pronoun to use in this context is normally "it". As explained in this article, "Whether the “getting pointed out/at” feature is particularly relevant depends on the specific intent of the speaker, and isn’t always necessary or meaningful.". The "getting pointed at" is not necessary here, as to the meaningfulness you must ...


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It feels awkward. This is because people often start a sentence "All my life ..." to refer to a period of time for which a subsequent statement is true (contracted from "For all of my life"), as in "All my life, I've been poor." In your "Tom" example, "All his life Tom has worked with enthusiasm", the ...


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While some could consider this "When to capitalize the word "earth"", it seems to me that you already know that you capitalize "Earth" when it is a proper noun (referring to our planet, Earth, in our solar system), and when it is just a noun referring to land/dirt/etc you don't capitalize. The question is really just, "is ...


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Let's look at this logically shall we?...If 12 a.m. is the MIDDLE of the night (Mid-Night) then that means there MUST be nearly an equal amount of 'Night' on either side of it, as it is in the 'Middle'. 'Night' is defined as: "The period of time between 'Evening' and 'Dawn' ". People tend to get confused at the difference between the terms 'DAY' ...


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