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70

This may be subtle and comes down to inflection and intention. I suspect that your manager was not being rude but trying to refer succinctly to a particular trade. If you were talking about a construction site you might talk about the "concrete people" or the "drywall people" to refer to the particular trades that were expert in those parts of the project. ...


51

Collocations modifying photo often don't refer to the photo as a physical object. They instead refer to the subject of the photo, or what's depicted in the image. To demonstrate this, here are the most common collocations for ____ photo according to the Corpus of Contemporary American English. I have bolded the ones that describe the image (source, subject,...


34

Depends what you mean by OK. It is grammatical, the meaning is apparent, and you would not be thrown in gaol for writing it. And (written later) I see that @Wilk has found some examples of “pregnant with crisis”. However I would not write it myself as I find it rather forced and unnatural. Perhaps the psychological basis of this is a positive association of ...


27

nude ADJECTIVE ... 1.1 [attributive] Depicting or performed by naked people. ‘she won't do any nude scenes’ Lexico


24

It’s a way to refer to photos with nude subjects. As you can see from Ngram this expression took off from the ‘60s/70s when pictures portraying nude people, generally women, started to become popular; the same expression was used earlier referring to paintings Nude: (of a photograph, painting, statue, etc.) being or prominently displaying a ...


23

It depends on the implication. If you assume "floor" to be a metaphor for "the lowest strata" or "beneath my feet" then certainly, it's derogatory. However, I don't think this was your manager's intention. Instead, in his question, "floor people" is an ellipsis of the people whose job it is to clean the floor This use is much the same as saying "the ...


13

I would not write pregnant with a crisis, but simply "pregnant with crisis". Google books turns up this usage a lot. Example - Against the grain, Terry Eagleton 1985 'Modernism' as a term at once expresses and mystifies a sense of one's particular historical conjuncture as being somehow peculiarly pregnant with crisis and change. It is only ever "...


10

I agree with the other answers that your manager meant "the floor people" as a neutral way to refer to the people whose specific task was to clean the floor as requested. I want to add something to that: he had put in a request last week for our janitors to mop up and then re-wax the tile floor in our area this morning. It's important to your manager ...


9

They are very different constructions, though both are (probably) possible here. First, note that stop, like many verbs denoting a change of state, can be used both transitively and intransitively: The boy stopped the ball. (transitive) The ball stopped (intransitive). The transitive use usually implies that the stopping was caused by something ...


9

It happens fairly often in English that an adjective is "transferred" from one subject to another, even when it doesn't strictly speaking apply to the latter, provided it is still relevant (in some sense) to the latter. This often begins as a mild figure of speech — see https://www.thoughtco.com/transferred-epithet-1692558 for various examples — ...


7

Both sentences are grammatical. They can both be used in the same contexts, with the same results. The sentences differ only in the Wh- clause at the end: [American pronunciation]: from where it was stopped [frəmˌwɛɹɪʔwɨ'stapt] from where it has stopped [frəmˌwɛɹɪɾɨ'stapt] Phonetically, the boldfaced portions above are almost identical. But they have ...


7

Nude photos is a noun phrase that has become idiomatic and manifests in slang such as "nudies" or simply "nudes". The phrase "nude photos of X" does indeed seem like a retro-construction. This phrasing is also more euphemistic or neutral, perhaps, since as you mentioned, technically, it would be "X" who is nude, but "X" is not the grammatical subject (it is ...


6

It's often the case when describing containers that we use adjectives that describe their contents rather than their own intrinsic properties. (containers isn't a technical term but it fit the concept). For example a physics textbook isn't physics, rather the contents describe knowledge we have on the field of physics your family photos aren't related to ...


4

As an English speaker, I think a better word is gestating. The world seems to be gestating an environmental crisis. Gestating implies pregnancy, but also that something is growing but not yet happened. How about changing the metaphor? I doubt pregnancy is pertinent to the context. The world seems to be brewing an environmental crisis. The world ...


3

From the OED, bold emphasis mine: nude A3c. (adj) Of a work of art, form of entertainment, etc.: involving or portraying one or more naked or scantily clad people; performed without clothing. Also of an actor or model: that performs or poses unclothed. 1869 D. N. Camp Amer. Year-bk. I. 791 Her charms, so freely exhibited on the stage at ...


3

Yes, it is idiomatic: pregnant with (something) Full of, or fraught with, or having a lot of something. Just before naming the guilty party, he gave a pause that seemed pregnant with meaning, and I wondered whether he was telling me the truth. Her speech was pregnant with emotion, and her eyes brimmed with tears as she spoke. (The Free ...


3

Yes, to put too much stress on a person (especially in this context) means to stress someone out. To stress literally means to press down on or to put pressure or tension on. We can express figurative tension or pressure using stress as well. If you think about it, emphasizing something is making it the focal point as if you were pressing into it. If you ...


3

Is there ever a case where there is a sentence that would be ambiguous if the wrong word was used? Yes. Both words can be verbs*: "I want to affect/effect change." Both words can be nouns*: "The affect/effect is pronounced." is [there] a need to have separate words at all? Probably not. English is full of homonyms and in some cases multiple meanings ...


3

ripe for (something) TFD In the condition that most invites or calls for something to happen, or particularly ready or in need of something. Example The world seems to be ripe for an environmental crisis.


2

The original source appears to be using pregnancy as a metaphor. The author has in mind a particular environmental crisis that is developing and will come into full existence at some future time. Metaphorically, that crisis is gestating within the world, and the world with give birth to that crisis at that future time. The problem in translation is that ...


2

If you are referring to a list of things to do (i.e tasks), then your first choice should be Task List. Although less commonly used, List of Tasks is also correct.


1

Normally stative predicates are supposed to be incompatible with the progressive form. E.g., The car is red, not *The car is being red. However, this is flouted in a special class of constructions generally referring to a person's behavior: You're being annoying, You're being dumb, etc., pointing out some temporary extreme of behavior. You're looking good ...


1

"I accept my fault" implies that you are admitting that you were at fault at a given point. As defined in Oxford English Dictionary: An unattractive or unsatisfactory feature, especially in a piece of work or in a person's character. "I accept it was my fault" indicates that a specific result was produced because of your mistake. It should also be ...


1

I'm not sure that it's as universally awkward in English as many are making it out to be. "Pregnant" has precisely this usage, and other usages that don't specify something positive, as noted by other answers. From the simple pregnant pause, as in "Mid-conversation, a sudden full pregnant pause exclaimed the awkwardness of the meeting," to pregnant with ...


1

It's awkward the way it's written The world seems to be pregnant with an environmental crisis. 'pregnant' tends to be something you are or aren't, so you're weakening it with 'seems to be'. While the idea of 'pregnant' does get across that we're waiting for the action to happen, it would work better as a definitive statement, combined with an adjective ...


1

I agree with those that note that this sounds slightly odd to a native speaker. But as part of an extended metaphor, it would come across just fine: The world seems to be pregnant with an environmental crisis. The moment of its birth will signal death for all we hold dear. although here "seems to be" would feel too weak.


1

I can't beat David's answer (translate the idea, not the words), but there is another reason to avoid the word pregnant. I would avoid anything that could be perceived as sexist. Political correctness is important in many countries.


1

Yes, there already is a closely-equivalent expression in the English language which you can use in this case. The expression, however, is not "pregnant with", but "pregnant for". You can see an example of it in use here: "the situation is pregnant for an accident with these conditions" (The Badger Herald) This is not such a common expression, but it ...


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