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25 votes
Accepted

When and why did the word "pasta" become commonly used?

According to Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary, the word pasta has appeared in English publications since at least 1847—but you wouldn't know it by checking editions of Webster's ...
  • 153k
5 votes

When and why did the word "pasta" become commonly used?

Ngram suggests it was around 1980.
  • 22.4k
4 votes

Is the term "mobile set" correct?

It is an obsolete usage. In the early days of radio, it was common to talk of a radio set, or television set as the device for receiving the communication using radio or television waves. Over time, ...
  • 13k
2 votes

What's the special meaning of "address" here?

Address is a special sort of place, which is a more general term for somewhere such as a region, an area, a site, a building ... Merriam Webster has Merriam Webster Address: a place where a person or ...
  • 25.1k
2 votes

What does "having a mid off" mean?

The suffix "-off" is often used to generate a term that means a contest or competition, with the stem describing the quality or activity that the participants are being compared on. For ...
  • 17.6k
2 votes
Accepted

Is the term "mobile set" correct?

Yes, it seems like "mobile set" is idiomatic and current in Indian English and perhaps some other dialects: Pickpockets take fancy to politicians' cellphones (Patna News - Times of India): &...
  • 59.5k
1 vote

When and why did the word "pasta" become commonly used?

Supposedly, pasta salad and pasta primavera became popular menu items in the early 80s, which was also reflected in pop culture. Don’t forget the wide range of ’80s movies that reflect ’80s food ...
  • 5,382
1 vote

Is the term "mobile set" correct?

In USA it is usually called a cell phone. In UK it is usually called a mobile phone. We don't say "mobile set", but it can be shortened to just mobile or cell (9b) The mobile phone is ...
  • 17.1k
1 vote

What is the meaning of the phrase 'for the purpose of' in legal context?

This is used when the document is defining terms. It's stating clearly that whenever the terms are used in this document, they should only be interpreted with these meanings. So it does essentially ...
  • 17.6k
1 vote

Is 'Can you make sure...?' rude?

No matter how much you soften it, make sure is rude addressed to your boss. You could express it differently, I would be grateful if you could do this by the end of the week so that we can complete ...
  • 18.9k
1 vote

Is "in the briefest of moments" a good synonym for "in the twinkling of an eye"?

There's nothing wrong with "in the briefest of moments" - it's grammatical, and the meaning will certainly be understood. But I wouldn't say that it's particularly poetic; it's quite literal ...
  • 14.8k
1 vote

Dialectal variation in subtleties of usage of the word "sore"

Sore started life as a noun and very quickly became an adjective. OED sore, n.1 Etymology: Old English sár strong neuter, = Old Frisian sêr (West Frisian sear , North Frisian siar ), In the 9th ...
  • 29.8k

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