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20

'Snitty' through the years The earliest instance I've been able to find of snitty where the word is used in its modern sense (derived from the noun snit) is from Philip Fair, A Marriage Is Arranged: A Love Story (1932) [combined snippets]: They looked up at Gay's step. "'Lo, Gay, ole thing!" from Nance the younger. Gay drew her brows together ...


19

from snit n. etymonline "state of agitation, fit of temper," 1939, American English, of unknown origin. First in Claire Boothe's "Kiss the Boys Good-bye," which gives it a U.S. Southern context. The OED registers snitty 1978, an adjective as: slang (orig. and chiefly U.S.). Ill-tempered, sulky. The use of the noun and adjective are infrequent in ...


9

According to the NY Times Style Guide, the underlying principles of quoting someone are respect for the speaker and the accurate representation of their statement. People often say things like “gotta” in place of “have got to”, and who can blame them? However, if you’re going to clean this up grammatically for publication, it would be more respectful of ...


8

Well, if you're just looking for usage examples, it's easy enough to do a Google search for the phrase "which decision proved," which method will give you quite a few examples. (They will include many quotations of a passage from Little Women involving a "second tumble down the beanstalk.") Of course, you can also substitute different nouns and verbs for "...


4

You will probably find many results if you search for relative adjective, which term you will find in Merriam–Webster and elsewhere: Relative adjective: a pronominal adjective that introduces a clause qualifying an antecedent (as which in: “our next meeting will be on Monday, at which time a new chairman will be elected” ) or a ...


4

I think the important phrase is act of, in the definition of "commemoration". An anniversary occurs without any active involvement. The anniversary of my wedding occurs on the same date each year, whether or not I buy my wife a gift. We might commemorate the anniversary by going out to dinner and exchanging gifts. The example of Tiananmen Square is ...


3

In general, you should not modify a quote. If someone said "gotta" then that's what you write, not a grammatically-corrected version. You do need to be careful to avoid implying that you are making fun of the person's mode of speech, though. However, you can add a suffix "[sic]" (short for 'sic erat scriptum', 'thus was it written') to indicate that this ...


3

The Associated Press Stylebook (2018) has the following entry on "Quotations" under News Values on p.520: Quotes must not be taken out of context. We do not alter quotations, even to correct grammatical errors or word usage. If a quotation is flawed because of grammar or lack of clarity, it may be paraphrased in a way that is completely true to the ...


2

I puzzled over this for some time and consulted with other native British English speakers. Our conclusion is that "I couldn't help laughing" is how you would describe an automatic reaction to something funny or amusing. "I could not help but laugh" is when laughter may not be the appropriate or expected response, with the implication that laughing is better ...


1

Oxford's online English-Spanish dictionary has the exact same example you mention: which cuál, pron. Pronunciación /(h)wɪtʃ/ /wɪtʃ/ ADJETIVO 2 2.1 (as relative) we arrived at two, by which time they had gone — llegamos a las dos y para entonces ya se habían ido Más frases de ejemplo in which case — en cuyo caso he refused, ...


1

Although were looks like a past tense, it is used in what is called the second conditional here. Grammar guides tend to ignore that fact that this conditional has a time frame. Referring to now, we say If I were a kid, I would play with my toys now. But referring to the past, we say If I had been a kid ten years ago, I would have played with my toys ...


1

'Much/many' is an adjective expressing quantity or amount. Many of this sort of adjective have plural forms which must be used when the noun is plural. Another example of a quantative adjective would be 'few' and 'a little'. 'Expectations' is a plural noun so the plural form 'many' must be used. 'High' is an ordinary adjective, nothing special about it! In ...


1

Vivid idiom meaning that an action/initiative/task can be achieved easily because there is minimal resistance. Apparently it's usage is on the up in both British and American English.


1

While contemporary is usually used for people (specifically as "his/her/their contemporaries"), it can also be applied to objects. To list a few examples found through the Corpus of Contemporary American English: Motobecane was a leading brand. After fading away (along with most of its Euro contemporaries), the brand is now making a comeback. (Bicycling, ...


1

The sentence Our business stands out from our contemporaries. forces business and contemporaries to be compared as though they were the same class of object, when what you really wish to compare is your business and the business of your contemporaries. Therefore, to be clear and precise in modern English you should compare those things, as follows: ...


1

No. "being just physical memory" is not a relative clause. Instead, it is the predicate of an absolute construction, whose subject is "the model of memory". An absolute construction has the sense of a subordinate clause, but with the specific subordinate conjunction left unspecified. Your example could be approximated with a subordinate "although" ...


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