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There are metonyms like '[the] cinema', 'the silver screen', which are often used in non-count usages. From BBC Bitesize: American culture and society underwent a period of great change between 1910 and 1929 due to the popularity of the cinema, silent films, talkies and the impact of jazz music. Obviously, this is not an exact synonym for 'films/movies', ...


4

Impetus is countable. You can say "an impetus for ..." and have it sound perfectly reasonable. You can't do that for uncountable nouns, like "I'm looking for a furniture for my room" or "I just learned an interesting information." There is a reason that you don't often see the plural. The Latin plural of impetus is impetus, like ...


3

Two common mass nouns are "film" and "cinema" as mentioned above. "Hollywood" has been used but of late, it tends to be used restrictively to indicate the character of American film. A bit further off is the term "the silver screen" or "celluloid" but these seem to be becoming uncommon.


2

There are confusing and conflicting terminologies surrounding this subject, not least as offered by dictionaries; I feel a well-formatted answer is needed. morphology: Like dogs, radii, oxen, paintings, 'surroundings' is plural in form. agreement: Like dogs, radii ... but also police and not news, surroundings takes a plural verb form.[1] countness: As two /...


2

Generally 'survival' is uncountable shows that you realise that it is in general unhelpful and unwise to class nouns as count[able] or non-count[able]. It is usages that must be analysed; many nouns display both count and non-count behaviour. Thus 'coffee' is non-count in 'Coffee is my favourite drink' but count in 'The two main coffees are robusta and ...


2

Almost any uncountable word can be countable. I can talk of cheese and cheeses (Cheddar and Wensleydale); of bread and breads (white and soda bread); even water and waters (pond water; sea water; drinking water). I can have a number of wines in the cellar. Opportunity is like this: many opportunities can arise to do something, in which case you have a lot of ...


2

It can be used both ways, based on intended meaning The answer to this question is found in the "usage". OP: Is it wrong to use the word "codes" in programming context? I shall use these codes. It depends on what you are referring to, even in programming context. If you mean a list of passwords, references (eg 'error codes'), a series ...


2

If you hear this form commonly among chess experts, I'd suggest two possibilities (aside from sloppiness or error): It is being used as a short hand staccato jargon: for example, in the movie Top Gun the protagonist is told over radio: "Maverick, do not engage bandit", rather than "the bandit". "Pawn" is being used as the ...


1

I've noticed many native English speakers that are professional chess players saying things like: "In this situation I can capture with pawn." I have found no examples of this on the internet. I would avoid it. In this context, the idiomatic use would be countable and thus would need a determiner/quantifier or be in the plural. "In this ...


1

I've baked masses of bread throughout my 27 years in the bakery. Wikipedia has profuse or abundant information about a myriad of topics. (do check the links for a wealth of synonyms :)


1

"Wall Street banks had made billions of dollars on complex investments backed by mortgages whose value now plunged." In this sentence, why was the word "value" used as a singular noun here? The singular is appropriate because each mortgage has only one value and that value has plunged on an individual basis. "- whose value now ...


1

Part of the answer is that, as you suggest, value encompasses the values of the countable mortgages. But this seems insufficient. If I write covid has decreased the values of my assets I imply that each asset (and therefore their total) has decreased. If I write covid has decreased the value of my assets I leave open the possibility that some have decreased, ...


1

Free hand is "countable" and "singular". So is "potato". If there is more than one potato in the bag you have a bag of "potatoes". If I gave a "free hand" to both Fred and Jack to pursue their respective duties, I could say I gave both Fred and Jack "free hands". There is nothing remarkable about ...


1

tl;dr Your student is not wrong, and the correction is unnecessary. The countability isn't exactly an issue, in this case the one is effectively acting as a pronoun (to avoid repeating the word diet). Your correction, sadly, is wrong because the diet is of the Japanese, not Japan. You should finish it … that of the Japanese to be correct (and I fear it ...


1

So, if any one man, in his own proper person, afford stuff for a good joke to anybody . . . let him cheerfully allow himself to spend and be spent in that way.* afford stuff for = provide the material for to spend and be spent = to be used


1

I think "attention to detail" indicates a skill or trait that you show broadly in your life. I would only use "attention to details" if I were referring to a specific incident or project, and probably only in the context of paying attention to THE details.


1

As Macmillan Dictionary notes, code as used in a software context is either countable or uncountable: code COUNTABLE/UNCOUNTABLE ​COMPUTING a set of instructions that a computer can understand Ngrams shows that computer code is currently used about four times more frequently than computer codes: The Corpus of Contemporary American English shows the same ...


1

Computer "code" is called that because it consists of a sequence of "opcodes" (operation codes) which specify the actions for the computer to take. Some place early in the evolution of computer jargon an instance of such a sequence came to be called "code", for no well-defined reason -- this is just the way that jargon develops....


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