51

I'm going to show the acoustic signals that are on the tape. It's hard to be certain on this one because the normal cues that you'd look for are just very faint or hard to distinguish. I'd be surprised if a linguist comments decisively for the media about what the tape shows going strictly by the physical audio (they might infer using other techniques). ...


36

It's too soon to tell for sure... This is an unprecedented situation where a head of state's typo became a widely mocked online meme. Essentially, Trump coined a new word and then openly challenged the public to guess what it meant in a follow-up tweet. A word like this, that becomes famous in a single day, could disappear and remain meaningless, or it ...


31

In my estimation, it all amounts to nothing more than an emotionally-driven burst of anger and frustration. Nothing worth parsing word-for-word. [“Fredo“] is like the n-word for us. That's a gross exaggeration. The n-word is used to dehumanize, ridicule and oppress black people. "Fredo" just means the dumb brother. Cuomo is also being a bit hypocritical ...


27

I don't think it's "Fredo" specifically that's the insult. Calling someone by a name that's stereotypically associated with their ethnicity is likely to be viewed as racism. So he would have a similar problem if he called him "Luigi" ("Mario" might work for others, but not him, because that's his father's and son's actual names), called an Arab "Muhammed", ...


24

It's most likely to be a typo for coverage given the context, though by most metrics there are plenty of more likely typos. Based on an analysis of error distances, and taking into account QWERTY keyboard layouts, the rather obvious coffee comes out top. Tweeting at midnight, does that mean too much or too little? But coverage is the highest-ranking word ...


20

He's not saying 'bigly'. He's saying 'big-league'. He uses what you hear often enough that sometimes in faster speech it sounds like 'bigly'; when slower he enunciates it as 'big league' (phonetically it is easy to drop (in pronouncing)/miss (in hearing) the 'g' because the diphthong /ij/ ends in the jot semi-vowel and final stops in English are not released....


16

(update) It was a typo Donald Trump has an unfortunate history of typos and misspellings in his tweets: From the original source cited by the OP, posted 31 May 2017, come the following The Washington Post quotes Trump targets ‘negative press covfefe’ in garbled midnight tweet that becomes worldwide joke At 12:06 a.m. Eastern time Wednesday, ...


11

Overview I'm going to try a little experiment here. I ask for the forbearance of my colleagues on EL&U. I want to share some data, but I do not have the expertise to interpret the data. So I want to make the data available in a Community Wiki answer so experts can weigh in on the data and perhaps draw some meaningful conclusions. You can vote up or down,...


8

The suffixes -ian/-an and -ist have somewhat different meanings. -ian / -an can mean when something relates specifically to a person, but -ist is typically used when something relates to an ideology. So if Trumpism becomes more popular as a term maybe Trumpist will win out. But I'm betting on Trumpian.


7

This has already been dealt with at ELL, where they closed it as 'opinion-based' because there isn't a solid consensus yet. All the same, it's going to be 'Trumpian' in official contexts. There's a fairly large number of productive suffixes in English available to create adjectives. Wiktionary's list is a starting place but still incomplete. Its current ...


6

To my ears, 45 says "I'd probably..." with an unaspirated d, hardly surprising before another stop in casual, hurried speech that elides most everything. The word would that hangs in the air following this sentence reinforces the conclusion that he said I'd rather than I.


5

The following is from the Merriam-Webster (https://www.merriam-webster.com/news-trend-watch/did-trump-say-bigly-or-big-league-20160927): "Did Trump Say 'Bigly' or 'Big League'? Both are real words, though 'big league' is rarely used as an adverb Lookups for big and bigly spiked on September 26th and 27th. Many people heard bigly when Trump said big ...


5

In a comment, Hot Licks wrote: It is, of course, a Trumpism to a large degree. "Big league", in the US, refers primarily to "major league" baseball teams and games, or at least to adult baseball, as opposed to "Little League" children's baseball. The idiom has been detached from that meaning over the years, though, and now might be used to refer, eg, to ...


5

The most common use of the phrase is "to turn oneself in (to authorities)" meaning to voluntarily surrender. For instance, "A man wanted by the state on a parole violation escaped arrest by U.S. marshals in Cambridge on Tuesday, but turned himself in on Thursday." http://host.madison.com/wsj/news/local/crime-and-courts/wanted-man-turns-himself-in-dane-county-...


5

The word stable can have many meanings. When something is stable, it's fixed and steady. If you needed advice, you'd probably go to your most stable friend, the one least likely to act crazy or be easily upset. Whether you're talking about an object or a person, the adjective stable implies reliability and strength. You can describe a government as stable, ...


5

At some level, the idea of "robbing a piggy bank" implies something along the lines of "stealing from children." There is a trope in U.S. popular culture of parents taking small sums from their child's piggy bank—for example, because they don't have enough ready change available for some immediate purpose. Normally the adults would be expected to pay the ...


5

Trump was re-tweeting a late-night comic who is allowed to be funny. In The Godfather (1972) John Cazale plays the brother Fredo. He eventually takes issue with the way he is treated as the less intelligent gopher, worker bee, by everyone in the organization. The name has taken on this role in popular culture. The man using "Fredo" as the name professed ...


4

kerfuffle: (noun) a commotion or fuss, especially one caused by conflicting views. "covfefe" is how a half-asleep person would pronounce kerfuffle. The time of the tweet was 12:06am..


4

Instances of 'a crusty voice' in the wild, 1831–1959 The expression "a crusty voice" has appeared a number of times over the past 200 years in the context of a (usually unseen) source of speech. The earliest instance that a Google Books search finds is from "Patronage" in The Philadelphia Album and Ladies' Literary Port Folio (September 10, 1831): There ...


4

With regard to inclusiveness, Winston Churchill did much the same seventeen days after taking over as Prime Minister on the 10th of May, 1940 (eight months after the beginning of the Second World War) when he made a brief statement to the Commons on 28 May reporting the Belgian capitulation, and concluding: Meanwhile, the House should prepare itself for ...


4

Trump is referring to what are more specifically called "scare quotes." In writing, we put scare quotes around a word or words to indicate that we're saying it ironically. In speech, to intimate this same meaning, you will see people as they say the word or words do a two-handed gesture where they curl the index finger and middle finger of each hand to ...


4

Hearts and minds and thoughts and prayers are present in dictionaries, unlike hearts and prayers. Hearts and minds , of biblical reminiscence, has probably gained popularity with the Vietnam War. From the Phrase Finder: A reader sent columnist William Safire antecedents from the Bible, a letter John Adams wrote in 1818, and a conversation Teddy ...


4

I think you have a fair reason to suspect that it might be some sort of malapropism or eggcorn, because it's such a cliche that's repeated so often, it's almost like a set phrase. Wikipedia has an entire article on "Thoughts and prayers". Thoughts and prayers The phrase "thoughts and prayers" is often used by public officials offering condolences after ...


3

The letter combines two independent clauses, the second of which begins with an adverb: Ultimately, it is only that dialogue that matters. The comma before the and is the standard comma before a coordinating conjunction joining independent clauses. The second preserves the comma before the initial adverb. I didn’t find this punctuation remarkable or ...


3

Am I correct transcribing Trump's words as [ʌɪʔ ˈprɒbəbli]? More like [aɪd̚ prɑbəbli] , with an /aɪ/ diphthong, an /ɑ/ sound, and an unreleased d (see below) Is D-glottalization a thing for a New York white speaker, i.e. would he pronounce I'd as [ʌɪʔ]? My personal opinion is that linguists are wrong calling this sound a "glottal stop". it's an ...


3

It means to "rat them out" and inform on their [nefarious ?] doings. With Trump you can never be quite sure. The Collins Dictionary thesaurus provides several terms for turn someone in hand someone over, denounce, inform on, blow the whistle on (informal), shop (British, informal), finger (US, informal), betray, sell out, split on (informal), grass on ...


3

Sad! is definitely a Twitter Trumpism: Failing @NYTimes will always take a good story about me and make it bad. Every article is unfair and biased. Very sad!— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) May 20, 2016 and Wow, Lyin' Ted Cruz really went wacko today. Made all sorts of crazy charges. Can't function under pressure - not very ...


3

Wow this is a tricky one! To help, let's consider another instance where we might see this construction I would rather clean the garage myself than ask that John clean it. The subject is stating that he would rather go through the trouble of cleaning a room than ask John (maybe John is annoying). I would rather clean the garage myself than to ask ...


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