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The elision of /j/ in deuce etc. in North American English is known as yod-dropping and occurs after coronal consonants (those that involve the tongue tip, i.e. /t, d, n, s, z, θ, l/) within the same syllable. This makes dew/due and tune homophonous with do and toon, respectively. It is present in all of North America except some parts of the Southern US. /...


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I am going to explain this as the grandson of Crow and Onondaga people. Indian giver This is offensive. We do not appreciate this usage. I don't care where it comes from. It has been used pejoratively since at least when I was exposed to it in the 60s. We used to respond to it as "...you mean white-man giver." as it was always the white government that ...


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I've never heard this phrase before (I don't live in the US), so have no instinct on the political correctness of its everyday usage. When the previous commenter mentioned Carlyle I decided to do a google. (I came across Thomas Carlyle when cotranslating some John Stuart Mill texts into German and he (Carlyle) is certainly not 'politically correct'.) In any ...


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Consider tune in AmE and BrE: in the latter it is like tyune /tjuːn/ (in AmE it is /tuːn/). This pronunciation after a dental /t/, /d/ and before U is a known difference, although I dont know the exact contexts in which it happens. See also Quora's Why do British speakers insert a "y" before the letter "u" when pronouncing... This has been written as a "...


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hang on is informal: hang on 2 informal wait for a short time: hang on a minute—do you think I might have left anything out? • (on the telephone) remain connected until one is able to talk to a particular person. -- New Oxford American Dictionary Also, when speaking on the telephone, hang on can easily be confused with hang up. To maintain a ...


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A ‘public house’ is a kind of bar in the UK that originated as a ‘house’ that was ‘public’. In other words, it was a house (looong ago!) where the owner had his friends round for drinks and food, and ended up turning it into a business. These were the original’ taverns’ - houses where you could stop for food and drink, often while travelling, and so they ...


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What I hear in your video is vocal fry, the somewhat raspy sound in a very low tonal register. It is a semi-voluntary affectation (this sound can also be the result of a a speech defect, but that is usually not the case). It is generally found to be more common among women than among men. It has become 'popular' among younger speakers in America fairly ...


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This term has unfavourable connotations in the UK, just so you are aware; 'Indian' here refers more frequently to someone from India, rather than a Native American. Few people are likely to be aware of its original meaning (which is actually a critique of colonialism) and would view it as inherently politically incorrect. I've only ever heard a few people ...


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I speak AmE, but I have encountered the term school-leaver or school leaver in BrE and AuE writings. Collins Dictionary defines school leaver: School leavers are young people who have just left school, because they have completed their time there. Cambridge Dictionary defines school-leaver: a young person who is about to leave or has just left ...


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According to the Canadian Oxford Dictionary (2nd ed.)*, which is the standard dictionary used by the majority of Canadian editors: draft beer noun (also esp. Brit. draught beer) beer drawn from a keg, not bottle or canned. draught beer esp. Brit. var. of DRAFT BEER. As both spellings are listed, both versions are correct—in other words, either can ...


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cuttie definitions.net cuttie (Noun) Short for a cutback. cuttie (Noun) A t-shirt that has had the sleeves removed. cuttie (Noun) Someone or something common and short or small. cuttie (Noun) A hare. cuttie (Noun) The Black Guillemot. cuttie (Adjective) Short, shortened or small. Nothing of a sexual sense found here, U Dictionary sole source.


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Could it be that there isn't even any clear-cut distinction when it comes to some contexts? Absolutely. Since both of your sources cite Huddleston and Pullum's Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (CGEL) and use the same breakdown that it does, and since I have the CGEL handy, I'll quote its statement on the subject (chapter 3, § 5.3.2, page 143):...


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Nonsense! "Pants" are definitely not underwear exclusively in the UK. Maybe it's a regional thing. Where I live in North West England, pants is a general name for all types of lower outer two legged garments and has been since I grew up in the early seventies! Trousers are just a formal pair of pants. Boys wear underpants and girls wear knickers. I found out ...


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