132

We call them Oven Mitts. At least online shopping seems to confirm! It's interesting to see that 'oven glove' is used too, it's obvious, but around here (NZ and Australia, and apparently the States) they are 'mitts'. However, looking up the definition of mitt: a glove leaving the fingers and thumb-tip exposed. Well, that's the last thing you want isn'...


85

I agree with Hot Licks. I am in the US. A wardrobe is a movable piece of furniture but a closet is built in to the house. A closet may have doors, unlike this one. As a child, when I read The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, I imagined something like the first picture. I wonder if kids in England imagine something like the second picture?


84

Source: I'm in my early thirties and have lived my whole life in South East England. I would personally use the term "cash machine" (or the abbreviated version "machine", see further comments below). As to the other suggested terms: ATM - I fully recognise this, and might even use it occasionally. This is probably due to the influence of the large amount ...


82

There's no word for this as such; in the UK 'fried eggs' always means 'sunny-side up', some places will understand 'over easy' but that's the limit of what is common knowledge. Something like "I don't want the yolks runny" Or "I want the yolks cooked through" should do the trick. This is anecdotal, as I can't find any references to this. When they ...


79

There is a usage difference between British and American English. Although a grill is everywhere a frame of metal bars used for cooking on a flame, Americans draw a distinction between grilling (cooking over a flame) and broiling (cooking under a flame), as when you use the broiler in your oven: As quoted in this LanguageHat post, In my American ...


68

I'm a Brit who prefers fried eggs hard. There isn't a usual British English name for that, because it's an unusual preference here. I ask for them "Hard-fried, so that the yolks are solid" and that usually works. Any variety of "over" in the description of a fried egg in the UK risks confusion. Many people know it is an American way of cooking eggs, but ...


44

You may have noticed that "programmed" and "programming" stand as an exception to the usual tendency for final consonant doubling to occur in two-syllable words only when the second syllable is stressed (for example, we double the final r in occurring but not in harboring). I use "tendency" guardedly here: Various other exceptions to this tendency exist, and ...


44

A look at early (pre-1800) English dictionaries points to a possible source of confusion early in the career of biscuit. Two dictionaries—Edward Phillips & John Kersey, The New World of Words: Or, Universal English Dictionary (1706) and John Kersey, Dictionarium Anglo-Britannicum: or, a General English Dictionary (1708)—have identical definitions for ...


43

As David M suggests it is due to pluralization. Americans tend to name their teams in reference to the collection of players on the team as a group. "The Yankees" or "The Red Sox" references the collection of players and managers who make up the team. A player is a Yankee, or a Red Sox, and the collection of players are "The Yankees". European football ...


32

The allophones of /t/ in English are [tʰ], [t], [ɾ], and [ʔ]. Which of those you get in any particular word and speaker depends on many, many factors. Both trader and traitor alike are indeed pronounced [ˈtʰɹeɪɾɚ] by most North Americans, particularly in casual or quick speech. Intervocalic /t/ almost always reduces to a single flap [ɾ] there. That’s why ...


27

Because it was not a French word, but a Scottish one. And we did lose a u — just not the u you were expecting. Per the OED, it was a corruption of grammar, which during the 18th century was variously spelled glamer, glamor, glammar, and then in Scotland, as glaumour. That was one u too many, though, and it went then to glamour where it has remained ever ...


26

While oven mitts work, my family usually used rectangular pieces of cloth that were often also purposed as placemats to stop the tablecloth from melting/catching on fire. These are called Pot holders, though the single word "potholders" is also used on shopping sites. They also come in silicone!


25

In British English the word 'grill' usually means something like these rather than a device for cooking over an open flame (which is the American usage): Grills like this have a heating element on top, and a space for the food to be cooked underneath. They would be called a broiler or salamander in US English, and aren't as common as they used to be. In ...


25

Answer: nope! Your impression appears to be an instance of the locality illusion, in which if you yourself don’t use something you overly generalize personal disuse to a much broader community via negative confirmation bias. It’s a form of cognitive bias that leads you to draw the wrong conclusion. In Corpora For while BNC, the British National Corpus, ...


24

An interesting anecdote appears in Benjamin Franklin's Autobiography. Then I walked up the street, gazing about till near the market-house I met a boy with bread. I had made many a meal on bread, and, inquiring where he got it, I went immediately to the baker's he directed me to, in Second-street, and ask'd for bisket, intending such as we had in Boston; ...


23

In American (but not British) English, /t/ and /d/ following a stressed vowel and preceding an unstressed one are normally neutralized to a flap [ɾ] sound. There are a lot of pairs that are neutralized this way; the standard example is writer ~ rider. However, that doesn't leave the pair indistinguishable, since English native speakers often lengthen ...


23

I know Indians and they prefer to be called Indians. Their reservations have names like Navajo Indian Reservation. Any office or bureau for them would have the name Indian in it. Here is a good article that discusses the Indians’ own preferences about what they would like to be called — and not called. So not only is it not offensive but it’s actually ...


22

They are two different verbs: "to lend" is conjugated "lend, lent, have lent", and "to loan" is conjugated "loan, loaned, have loaned". According to Merriam-Webster, the verb to loan has died out in the U.K. This is corroborated by Google Ngrams, although it now appears to have been reintroduced from AmE. Thus, for BrE, your wife is correct. For AmE, both ...


22

The usage of grill here is British English, not American. From the Oxford English Dictionary: grill noun British 1 A device on a cooker that radiates heat downwards for cooking food: place under a hot grill [as modifier]: a grill pan This is a modern domestic cooker, specifically a Neptune 4500 combination gas oven, burner and grill: ...


20

The reason? A man by the name of Noah Webster, who wrote America's blue-backed spellers, and her first dictionary. Noah Webster, was an English spelling reformer, and one of the chief advocates of English spelling reformers is that spelling should change alongside pronunciations : Pronunciations change gradually over time and the alphabetic principle ...


19

If you worked on it yesterday, stopped yesterday before finishing then, and don't want to say anything else about whether you will or can continue or not, but more likely that you are done for good (like a one-time test), then: I didn't finish it. If you worked on it yesterday, stopped yesterday before finishing, and want to imply that you are still ...


19

I think a big difference is: all of the English football team names implicitly or explicitly end with "Football Club." That is, the full name of "Manchester United" is actually "Manchester United Football Club" (sometimes "Manchester United F.C."). There is no equivalent for American team names. "The Cincinnati Reds" are not "The Cincinnati Reds Baseball ...


19

Some of the successive meanings given in the OED are: 1a. " A light flat-bottomed boat or skiff in use on the Venetian canals, having a cabin amidships and rising to a sharp point at either end; it is usually propelled by one man at the stern with a single oar." U.S. A large flat-bottomed river boat of light build; a lighter; used also as a gun-boat. 4a. "...


19

As an alternative to the other answers, you could ask for your egg to be fried with a "hard yolk". This is how I usually phrase this request. It will usually be understood because hard / soft are commonly used in reference to boiled eggs: "hard boiled egg" vs "soft boiled egg". Whether or not your request will actually be honoured is another matter! In my ...


18

The hair-color called red, ginger, orange, etc. According to the citations provided by the OED for the hair-color sense of ginger, it first came into use during the 19th century. Using red for a hair-color is many centuries older, almost six of them in fact depending on how you count things. That makes ginger a newcomer compared with calling a person with ...


17

Following Thursagen's trail on Noah Webster, I found the following note in 1828 Webster's entry for skeptic This word and its derivatives are often written with c instead of k in the first syllable, -- sceptic, sceptical, scepticism, etc. Dr. Johnson, struck with the extraordinary irregularity of giving c its hard sound before e, altered the spelling, and ...


16

In the U.S., lemonade is a drink made from lemons, sugar, and water. No carbonation. Pink lemonade is lemonade with red grape juice or grenadine mixed in:


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