17

He has an impressive / an outstanding / a strong / a proven / ... track record. track record: a record of past performance often taken as an indicator of likely future performance These stocks have a proven track record. [Merriam-Webster] (Obviously, a positive adjective premodifier is needed here.) As always with requests for 'opposites', not every ...


11

One opposite could be "to be a Cassandra", that is, to be right but not be believed. This doesn't bring in the repetition implied in crying wolf, so it isn't perfect.


9

It's still a widget. Widget was a general term for a small piece of hardware long before software existed. The term was just incorporated into software terminology. The same thing thing applies to "bug" which originally applied to a fault in wiring, particularly complicated sensitive wiring like telephone and aircraft systems. The idea was that ...


5

He has/is the “hot hand”. The phrase is said to come from basketball. The "hot hand" (also known as the "hot hand phenomenon" or "hot hand fallacy") was considered a cognitive social bias[1] that a person who experiences a successful outcome has a greater chance of success in further attempts. -wikipedia This contrasts with “...


5

The "crying wolf" metaphor doesn't just refer to any unreliable source of information; for that, we have words like "unreliable". "Crying wolf" is when some signal is discounted (rightly or wrongly) because experience shows a particular reason to doubt that signal. So, the opposite of this would not simply be any reliable ...


4

I would argue that a word that can describe one who is believed based on numerous past successes is reputation. This isn't exactly an antonym to "the boy who cried wolf" because this phrase is a reference which requires knowledge of a story, analogous to how Captain Picard in "Darmok" meets and learns to communicate with a race who ...


4

You can remove the quotation marks from "sub-recipe," because that's the correct term, at least in recipes and recipe books. I haven't found a dictionary definition; however, subrecipe and parent recipe are terms used in other fields as well. subrecipe/sub-recipe What is a sub-recipe? Keywords: subrecipe, sub-recipe A sub-recipe is a recipe that ...


3

Nothing succeeds like success A proverb, expressing the idea that success breeds further success. This view was first put into print by Sir Arthur Helps, in Realmah, 1868: "Nothing succeeds like success." [Rien ne réussit comme le succès.] phrases.org


3

One word is control, but hardware items tend to have their own specific names, as the Lexico entry demonstrates. control 1.5 [count noun] A switch or other device by which a device or vehicle is regulated. She pressed one button and the controls, switches, and buttons all came to life around her. Most excavator operators find it easier to operate levers, ...


2

As pointed out in @Edwin's comment referring to this earlier Answer, the relevant term here is... Enallage ...related to solecism (a deviation from conventional word order). Enallage, however, is usually regarded as a deliberate stylistic device, whereas a solecism is commonly treated as an error of usage. A few famous examples from advertising / TV / ...


2

"Solecism" is the closest thing that comes to mind. And "Malapropism" is the mistaken use of an incorrect word in place of a word with a similar sound.


2

Australian national = Someone entitled to an Australian passport. In British and Commonwealth law a national of a given country is the only type of person entitled to a passport of that country. The right to a passport is governed by the laws of the country. It may be by descent from a national or birth in the country (or one of its territories) or may be ...


2

Do tiers with higher numbers always mean better than those with lower numbers? No, and it's far more likely to be the other way round. But it can depend on context. Some confusion might arise if the tiers are being considered as a progression, like rungs on a ladder. You start at the bottom (first tier, because that's the starting point) and end progress to ...


1

It can also be called a "day of the week" — which means one of the seven named days. (But not "weekday", which often is understood to exclude Saturday and Sunday.) However, unless you specify exactly what you mean, any reference to a "day" is subject to ambiguity, and many people will not automatically assume that you mean it to ...


1

According to the online version of Black’s Law Dictionary, a natural day is “properly the period of twenty-four hours from midnight to midnight. Co. Litt. 135; Fox v. Abel. 2 Conn. 541; People v. Hatch, 33 111. 137.”


1

According to the OED's citations, square was first used 1300-1400; triangle 1398; quadrangle 1398; rectangle 1560; then hexagon 1560; polygon 1560; pentagon 1570; octagon 1594; trigon 1600 (basically all around the same time) It looks like we adopted a neat Latin naming convention as we found interest and practical use for more figures with an increasing ...


1

The issue about grammar has already been addressed, so this answer takes a broader perspective. Your quote is a case where being wrong in one category can make it right in another. Being wrong grammatically (grammatical agreement) means the spelling (of the plural) is right. Having the wrong spelling (should be singular) means the grammar isn’t the problem.


1

Spelling mistakes are not grammatical errors. They’re just glitches in the execution of one or another encoding technology used for the language. If you cannot hear it, it’s not grammar. But using a plural for a singular or vice versa is very much a grammatical error because you've broken obligatory numeric concord. Each of these is ungrammatical because of ...


1

"communicator" for person A, and for person B "intended recipient" or "intended audience" or "communicatee" (last one I made up). If person B replies followed by no further relevant communication persists, then person B could be called a "respondent" (as in a two-way conversation) though naturally that term ...


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