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This sentence is quite confusing as to what receiving various assessments at the hands of different scholars modifies. "Traditional grammar" says that it should modify the closest reasonable noun, which would be nature or monument. (See Purdue Owl's webpage on this.) However, to me it reads like it should modify debate, which makes utter nonsense ...


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Use "Item 2", not "Item number 2" (and not No. or № or #). Similarly use "Figure 4" not "Figure number 4", and "Paragraph 3" not "Paragraph number 3".


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In the case of a list of equations or scientific propositions, one convention is to number the list as in the following example: X + Y = 8 (1) X = Y (2) Z = X.Y (3) We find Y by solving (1) and (2). Z may be calculated from (3).


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Here’s what I think about this. There are several distracting things about this question that have led us all astray. First, there’s some ambiguity about the first statement which is, I think, irrelevant to the real question. Do the words “It’s just that they won” mean that it is fair that they won, or do they mean that the fact that they won is the only ...


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Was a case of yours ever referred to the court? Was a case of any of yours ever referred to the court? Has a case of any of yours ever been referred to the court? Was a written record of the activities of the court kept? What does the hospital have these instruments for? For which things does the hospital have these instruments? "Ever" has been ...


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So this is likely referring to breastfeeding given the comments you mentioned. I will attempt to provide an explanation that has some sort of reasoning (knowing the comment is mostly to get a rise out of people, it may not be correct). He/she is basing his comment on the fact that the baby sucks on a nipple, which can be a sexual act in sexual activity. &...


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Parallelism is a grammatical option to make sentences easier to read by making sentence parts more similar to each other, like "I cooked it, I prepared it, and I ate it," as opposed to "I cooked, prepared, ate it." (The removal of the final "and" could imply some rhetorical form, but admittedly this sentence is more hard to ...


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It does seem that urgent is used less often than imperative here, and the comments show that some people perceive it as less idiomatic. I don't myself perceive anything wrong with urgent to. Furthermore, while Google Ngrams shows that it is used less often, it is quickly gaining currency. I believe the reason for this is that urgent to means something ...


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Dictionary definitions show that the two words, "urgent' and "imperative" are different in that a matter of time is made clear in the first only, but that can be left aside. I tend to share your intuition in finding "imperative" more idiomatic than "urgent" and that would possibly result in my avoiding the latter but I have ...


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By parsing the sentence, we can figure out whether we should use “who” (subjective) or “whom” (objective). ...especially the peasants, who(m) Stalin claimed would benefit most from a communist nation. Stalin isn’t claiming “who(m).” Instead, “who(m)” is the subject of “would,” so “who” is the correct pronoun.


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Industrialization in the USSR did not provide a better life for many soviets, especially the peasants, who(m) Stalin claimed [___ would benefit most from a communist nation]. The pronoun is not object of "claimed" but subject of the embedded "would benefit" clause (bracketed), so subjective "who" (not objective "whom")...


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I think they both sound fine. I am a native speaker and I feel like both sentences are grammatically correct. The second sentence sort of gives the impression that you are asking a question (like you aren’t sure of the salt content) but in a typical conversation either sentence should be understood without issue.


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"Six foot" should be hyphenated ("six-foot") because it constitutes as single adjectival phrase. For the same reason, "foot" is in the singular. For example, "a six-foot soldier." "Six feet" would be used (in the plural and without a hyphen) where "feet" is a noun within the sentence, and not part ...


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MIDDLE ENGLISH fot /foːt/ "foot" : by far the most common plural form is feet, and fot is usually only used in contexts of the unit of length. OED: Foot (pl. feet): lineal measure (Often in sing. when after numerals). 2. Ellipt. Foot-soldiers; †men of foot. Often after an ordinal, with ‘regiment of’ omitted.


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How about use both? This process, as Smith's analysis explains/says/states/explores/discusses/posits, is a way to...


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