49

Perhaps this is the word you're looking for: The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails. {William Arthur Ward} Collins defines realist thus: A realist is someone who recognizes and accepts the true nature of a situation and tries to deal with it in a practical way. EDIT Many thanks to @...


41

Is there a better term to use in place of “gold standard”. Probably not - it is quite a precise term. I have to take issue with some of your assumptions: It is common to see things described as the "gold standard". It means that something is the best and is the ideal against which other things are to be compared. This is accurate. Gold provides ...


37

How about "amble"? https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/amble "Bilbo was enjoying his mead, ambling around the yard, not accomplishing anything in particular this summer afternoon." The origin of "amble" is from a Latin word meaing "walk about", so it would primarily denote a walk. It doesn't depict any ...


34

If you're writing for an IT audience, the term "cargo cult" might be perfectly appropriate. Refer to the Wikipedia entry for cargo cult programming or this article on Medium, "The Curious Case of Cargo Cults and Corporate Innovation." You do seem to want a slightly pejorative term here, since the practice in question is maladaptive. I ...


28

I'm going to give you a sad answer: There isn't one. I posted the same question quite a while ago on an "inclusive language" forum and the dozen people there -- folks who are paid to think about making language more inclusive for IT professionals -- were unable to come up with an alternative. Since we cannot use discriminatory terminology in ...


27

That is called pottering (around). Potter (around): To move around without hurrying, and in a relaxed and pleasant way. Example: I spent the afternoon pottering around the garden doing a few odd jobs. [Cambridge English dictionary] In your sentence, you could say: Bilbo was enjoying his mead, pottering around the yard, not accomplishing anything in ...


23

According to Merriam-Webster, there are two senses of gold standard. The first is the economic sense that isn't wanted. The following is the second sense: 2 : BENCHMARK sense 1a Rather than it just being one of several synonyms, it's specifically called out in the definition, which means that it's the closest of synonyms in meaning—at least according to ...


23

A word that might fit is to call such a work a reimagining. A reimagining of a work takes existing elements like characters, setting, genre, tropes, or plot, and changes them in some way. It doesn't necessarily indicate that the new work is darker or grittier or not comical, but a reimagined work will often differ in key aspects like plot or tone. Typically, ...


22

unauthorised/unauthorized not having official permission or approval. unauthorized access to the computer system (OxfordL) Or without someone's official permission to do something or be in a particular place: Unauthorized personnel are not admitted beyond this point. (Cambridge) However, your category of *shirt, shoes, dogs is a bit strange. I don't ...


20

The word delinquent (basically standing for the legal term juvenile delinquent) is frequently used in US English in this sense. The OED has the definition A person who commits an offence against the law or customary morality; a criminal, an offender. Now chiefly specifically: a person, especially a young person, who (persistently) commits minor crime or ...


18

Looking at the image there's nothing "beautiful" about the woman's mammary glands. The colloquial term "tits" is vulgar, so use the formal, inoffensive, "breasts". The image alone will be enough to offend any who are straitlaced. She had large sagging breasts. (uncomplimentary) She had large breasts (positive neutral meaning) ...


16

Magical thinking is a possibility. Wikipedia defines it as "the belief that unrelated events are causally connected despite the absence of any plausible causal link between them, particularly as a result of supernatural effects". It's often used in the context of superstitions such as "If I do this, my sports team will win." (Healthline ...


13

Best practice (industry best practice, best practices, etc.). If you want to emphasize that you are trying to improve upon it, you could say the current best practice. From Lexico.com: commercial or professional procedures that are accepted or prescribed as being correct or most effective. There are some healthcare specific uses, from a whole Wikipedia ...


13

The words that you would use must express as closely as possible the intended meaning of the original. So, perhaps, in case you have not done this already, it makes sense to write down the story in Spanish, and think through, very carefully, what meaning each word and phrase need to convey. If you use, in Spanish, 'grandes tetas', it may make sense to say '...


13

I think "complacent" may be a close answer. adj. having or showing a lack of interest or concern Source: Merriam-Webster (A correct answer would be based on how you describe this person. Does he/she know enough of the subject to not investigate or is the subject of discussion too bland for the person's taste so as to not arouse any interest? If ...


13

I would most likely use the word vapid. M-W gives: "lacking flavor, zest, interest, animation, or spirit : FLAT, DULL" I find that in contemporary American use, the word (when a applied to a person) suggests that the person doesn't think too hard about anything.


13

Juvenalian Satire Juvenalian satire, in literature, any bitter and ironic criticism of contemporary persons and institutions that is filled with personal invective, angry moral indignation, and pessimism. The name alludes to the Latin satirist Juvenal, who, in the 1st century ad, brilliantly denounced Roman society, the rich and powerful, and the ...


11

Another word that could be used here is touchstone. Touchstone: An established standard or principle by which something is judged. Example: Until relatively recently, the Japanese car industry was the touchstone of international success. [Cambridge English dictionary] Exemplar could also be used. I think industry leading techniques would work well in your ...


11

I would describe such a person as dull. When used to describe a person it can have the following meanings: [...] 4. Intellectually weak or obtuse; stupid. 5. Lacking responsiveness or alertness; insensitive: half-asleep and dull to the noises in the next room. 6. Dispirited; depressed: a dull mood. [...] (these are from the American Heritage Dictionary). ...


10

I have had it with the finger wagging. I have had enough of your finger wagging. Click on this link to see the moving image. https://media.tenor.com/images/2ce44aa0928dd53c779921ed5dac9a16/tenor.gif WARNING Be very careful how you use "fingering" it has sexual connotations if used in connection with a person. It is okay with most inanimate objects,...


10

pootle, v. OED British colloquial. intransitive. To move or travel in a leisurely manner; [...] Frequently with around, along, about. 1988 Bicycle Midsummer 57/1 Pootling through Nottingham recently, I came across a branch of a shop called Concept Man. 2020 http://more-to.org/about/ And I love walking, enjoying several expeditions in the greater ...


10

I personally love using the word "epitome". Check out the Oxford English Dictionary's definition of it: epitome: A person or thing that is a perfect example of a particular quality or type.


10

Rebel is a common term for a person who resists authority, control, or convention. It can be used in a political context, but can also be used to describe a young person who flouts authority. The 1955 film Rebel Without a Cause uses the term in exactly this context, describing disaffected teenagers who act out against authority by engaging in reckless and ...


10

"Buying something outright" means buying in full without any hire purchase, installment plan, or other arrangement. Lexico has as one meaning of outright "Not by degrees or instalments." Example sentence: "they decided to buy the company outright" Merriam-Webster defines it in rather formal terms as "made without ...


10

The term "philistine" applies to culture in general, which is not quite "intellectuality", as this latter substantive "intersects" with it. (SOED) culture […] 6. A particular form, stage, or type of intellectual development or civilization in a society. (OED) philistine adj. […] 2. Uneducated, unenlightened; indifferent or ...


10

Unsanctioned is high register but semantically correct. unsanctioned [adjective]: lacking effective or authoritative approval or consent: not sanctioned ... Historically, swimming in unsanctioned places in the U.S. has proved deadly for people of color. [Anelise Chen, The Atlantic, 27 May 2021] [Merriam-Webster] [The] unsanctioned use of company cars [...


9

A novel virus is not necessarily new. Wikipedia says A novel virus is a virus that has not previously been recorded. It can be a virus that is isolated from its natural reservoir or isolated as the result of spread to an animal or human host where the virus had not been identified before. It can be an emergent virus, one that represents a new virus, but it ...


9

Maybe "apathetic" - having or showing little or no interest, concern, or emotion (From Merriam-Webster.) Technically this is an opposite word, but it's somewhat diverged from being just the opposite of pathos.


8

No-one so far has mentioned bimble (which is British English): Bimble at Urban Dictionary: To amble without real aim, yet in a friendly and harmless manner. It's not required to acheive nothing, though it is a frequent side effect. Bimbling can be made a little more business like with a slight hunch of the shoulders. "Tron and Enid whiled away many a ...


8

Actually Lexico defines chortle as “Laugh in a noisy, gleeful way.” and Dictionary.com points out that: There are many different kinds of laughter. There’s the kind that leaves us clutching our bellies and gasping for air, and there’s kind that barely escapes our lips in restrained titters. The chortle, defined as “a gleeful chuckle,” falls somewhere in ...


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