79

matutinal adjective [formal] happening in the morning: We chatted over our matutinal coffee. [Cambridge Dictionary] Though normal people have morning coffee.


59

The allure for me at this restaurant is their sumptuous ravioli. allure TFD n. The power to attract; enticement.


50

The appeal maybe? "To me, the appeal of this restaurant is their sumptuous ravioli." From Cambridge Dictionary: "the quality in someone or something that makes him, her, or it attractive or interesting:" sex appeal Spielberg's movies have a wide appeal. This used to be a marvellous hotel but it has lost its appeal in recent years.


38

I think you're going for "attraction" which is the noun form of attract. But the sentence is still a little stilted. "Draw" would be nice - "The draw for me at this restaurant is the sumptuous ravioli."


38

How about brittle? 1a : easily broken, cracked, or snapped definition from m-w.com From the "choose the right synonym" section, Merriam-Webster also says: Fragile, frangible, brittle mean breaking easily. Fragile implies extreme delicacy of material or construction and need for careful handling. Frangible implies susceptibility to being broken ...


32

I think the word you want is euphemism. According to Merriam-Webster, euphemism - noun The substitution of an agreeable or inoffensive expression for one that may offend or suggest something unpleasant The expression so substituted It fits all your examples, e.g. "Cautious is just a euphemism for being scared."


25

I think I would use matinal, which the OED holds to have the same meaning as matutinal. However the latter they designate as now chiefly literary. The examples they provide, for matinal across three main senses, are as follows: = matutinal adj. 1. 1803 M. Charlton Wife & Mistress (ed. 2) II. i. 11 To attend the matinal déjeuné's of ...


18

It's more about formality and establishing a direct cause-and-effect link than specific outcomes. Here's another non-negative example : After years of dating idiots, she ended up with the man of her dreams. "Resulted in" is formal and defines a direct relationship. "Ended up with" is informal, and could suggest that there may have been other factors ...


14

"unreliable" seems like a good fit. ".. there are precision issues and different contexts that make this algorithm unreliable." unreliable - "not able to be trusted to do or provide what is needed or promised" MW If you describe a person, machine, or method as unreliable, you mean that you cannot trust them. e.g. He had an unreliable car. Collins


13

Two distinctions have been mentioned already: "Result in" is more formal than "end up with" "Result in" indicates that the outcome was a consequence of the subject of the verb. But there is a third distinction. In "result in", the subject of the verb is an action or a process. So you can say Driving in the construction site resulted in a flat tire. ...


13

Think of ‘jersey’ as being like an ancient ‘brand-name’ for ‘sweater’, originating from an island off France, where they were made, that eventually became synonymous with ‘sweater, pullover, and jumper’ which are other words for similar garments. A bit like how ‘hoover’ (a brand-name) became the name for ‘vacuum cleaner’, in the UK. As Jeeped has ...


11

witty (adjective) wit (noun) These words describe the ability to make quick, sharp, clever comebacks. Winston Churchill was famous for his quick and biting wit: Member of Parliament, Nancy Astor, speaking to Winston Churchill: If I were your wife I would poison your coffee.. Churchill: If you were my wife, I would drink it. Member of Parliament, ...


9

If it is a child, naughty, a naughty child. If it is a teenager, rebellious, so a rebel. If it is a work colleague, awkward or contrary . If it is political, dissent, so dissenter. However, I am not sure if this is what your looking for. A person who always does as requested could be said to be compliant so the opposite would be disobedient. disobedient; ...


9

First, a necessary disclaimer: context and audience matter a lot in what is considered insulting. For instance, two people may interpret being called girl differently; calling a coworker or boss a girl has different connotations compared to calling your best friend a girl. This answer will not attempt to parse all of the nuances of context. Rather, it will ...


9

It’s insensitive. See for example these headlines: A culturally insensitive nursing textbook illustrates the pickle medicine is in How Being Polite Can Be Insensitive to People with Disabilities


8

Enticing? It may be worth using a thesaurus here to get a list of suitable words. I was enticed to the restaurant by their delicious ravioli.


8

I would say "… makes this algorithm precarious" Precarious: 1) not securely held or in position; dangerously likely to fall or collapse 2) dependent on chance; uncertain


8

According to Merriam-Webster, you can use plot: [ perhaps back-formation from complot ] : a secret plan for accomplishing a usually evil or unlawful end from m-w.com


8

You could consider cross-party group or cross-party consensus, depending on the context: Cross-party activities involve two or more political parties. A cross-party group consists of members from two or more political parties. https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/cross-party


7

It's just my kneejerk reaction perhaps. Informal. reacting according to a certain habitual manner; unthinking: a knee-jerk liberal. Synonyms: involuntary, unthinking, spontaneous. Perhaps also affective or compulsive.


7

The answer is in your question: 'length'. No value is added by introducing the unit of measurement into the concept. But in the UK we inconsistently still talk about 'mileage' driven in our cars whilst measuring our carpets in metres.


7

I would say either "defiant" or "recalcitrant" might be words worth considering. I think "defiant" is a better word for what you've described. defiant marked by resistance or bold opposition, as to authority; challenging Collins Dictionary full of or showing a disposition to challenge, resist, or fight Merriam-Webster Dictionary In other ...


7

Ameliorate is a less common word than improve, so I'd agree that it sounds more formal and could be out of place in everyday conversation. Putting that aside, it also sounds like a slightly odd usage of the word - while ameliorate does mean to improve, it's generally used more as a synonym of resolve, which is to fix a specific problem, rather than to ...


6

Rapier wit is slightly different from witty: there's a (sharp) rapier in mind. Rapier wit: ability to deliver witty and cutting remarks A rapier is a very thin sword with a long, sharp point.


6

I have always used contrary: [Merriam-Webster] 2 : being not in conformity with what is usual or expected // actions contrary to company policy // contrary evidence 4 : temperamentally unwilling to accept control or advice So: She was described as contrary because she was told to not go to the party, but did it anyways. She was called ...


6

Related: haphazard. Things are often unreliable because they were improvised or cobbled together in an unsystematic fashion. That term may come in handy for one of your future commits ;-).


6

What you're looking for likely doesn't exist because authority on this topic is still decentralized, so systematic study is not yet meaningful. I think it's worth considering what a systematic study might look like: Let's say someone did a scientific survey of what each pronoun means to a large group of people. What survey cohort would be relevant? Most ...


6

You could say it was a “faux pas“ or a “gaffe” because it was a socially awkward blunder. You could describe the remark as “gauche” or, a bit less harshly, as “clumsy.” If you’re particularly looking to describe the person, not the action, you could call them “careless,” “thoughtless,” “inconsiderate,” or “graceless.”


6

Why not use "matin", as in "matins" (morning devotions)? I would even use "matinal", though it might not be in every dictionary. "My usual matinal activities always include breakfast and prayers."


5

I think 'intrusion' would work for your sentence: “Sarah closed her eyes, reaching out her arms as if in an embrace and I got the sudden sense of intrusion”.


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