8

You could consider cross-party group or cross-party consensus, depending on the context: Cross-party activities involve two or more political parties. A cross-party group consists of members from two or more political parties. https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/cross-party


2

The following extract from the Grammarist can be helpful: Briton is the most widely accepted term for people from Britain (which of course is not the same as England and the United Kingdom). Britisher had a brief heyday in the 20th century, but it was always only an American term and was never accepted by Britons themselves. Brit is not offensive, but it ...


2

In your example, "to unstitch" is used figuratively. "To unstitch", in its literal sense, is used to express the action of taking the stitches (the thread/cotton joining parts of a garment) out of a garment. This, of course, reduces the garment to its component parts. So "to unstitch" means "to take apart" - "to take apart" differs from "to change".


2

In the civilian prison system, this person can be called a trusty. trusty NOUN A prisoner who is given special privileges or responsibilities in return for good behavior. There had been a riot over in C Block at breakfast time, and one of the trusties, suspected of grassing, had been doused in hot fat, and set afire.


2

With the word ‘chair’, you can use either 'empty', 'vacant' or 'free'. You could also say 'is this chair taken?' In AmE, 'free' is used more frequently than 'vacant'. 'Empty' is used mainly for containers (bottles etc) but can also mean "without people" For homes, flats, hotel rooms etc., use 'vacant'. 'Free' is ambiguous. It also means 'free of cost'. ...


2

"Brit" was formerly an offensive word (Wiktionary). The Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary tells us that it is informal and can sound negative. "Brit" is a word that as an adjective and/or a noun preceded by the indefinite article (a Brit) shows a sharp decline in its frequency of use in the fourth part of the 20th century, while over the same period ...


2

A cursory search of the Internet pulls up the information that the word seems only to exist as a dictionary entry and was coined in about 2012: https://www.collinsdictionary.com/submission/3766/Lalochezia - New Word Suggestion Lalochezia The use of foul language = Submitted By: SukhJug - 23/08/2012 - Approval Status: Pending Investigation ...


2

OP: "I know that to bail somebody out generally means to provide funds to get someone out of a difficult financial situation" Bail out also means to quit something: "The actor has bailed out of the film after only three weeks' shooting." - Cambridge Dictionary The phrase is also often used with the specific meaning of leaving a crashing plane via parachute:...


2

I can think of sycophantic, servile, subservient, grovelling, toadying, fawning, ingratiating, bootlicking. Do any of those work?


2

"Multipartisan" is recognized by some, but not all, dictionaries. https://www.lexico.com/en/definition/multipartisan multipartisan (also multipartizan) adjective Of, representing, or composed of members of more than two (political or other) parties.


2

"Moviemaniac" is another term meaning "cinemaniac" (ref.). There is also "filmaholic" and "movieholic" (ref.), but according to the Wiktionary, despite the disaproving "aholic" appending connoting "addiction" those two terms connote rather the idea of enthusiasm (cinephile (ref.), cineast) and not that of addiction. This is in contradiction with Urban ...


1

Henceforth? How do you plan to use this word?


1

The term that comes to mind is “Punching bag”


1

I think the word you want is: Chide https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/chide : to voice disapproval to : reproach in a usually mild and constructive manner : Note, specificially the "mild and constructive" part.


1

A good word here is cathartic, as in cathartic swearing. In fact this is the exact expression used by one expert when classifying different types of swearing: According to Steven Pinker, there are five possible functions of swearing: Cathartic swearing, used in response to pain or misfortune Wikipedia: Profanity


1

"Nonconformist" is the most apt word I could think of for what you've described in the question. Other words similar to it are: free spirited, maverick, independent-minded, individualist, etc.


1

Word Hippo has confirmator One who, or that which, confirms; a confirmer. and confirmer One who confirms something along with lots of others, like confirmee A person who is confirmed via religious rite. and confirmand A candidate for confirmation or affirmation of baptism.


1

Is the answer not confirmation. It is certainly "that which confirms". It also works with your example sentence: The confirmation was broken, and clients were unable to establish the requests were submitted.


1

Etymonline's entry for "Briton" includes the following: Briton (n.) c. 1200, "a Celtic native of the British Isles," from Anglo-French Bretun, from Latin Brittonem (nominative Britto, misspelled Brito in MSS) "a member of the tribe of the Britons," from *Britt-os, the Celtic name of the Celtic inhabitants of Britain and southern Scotland before the 5c. ...


1

As a minor supplement to user067531's answer, I note the following instance of "Brits" from a poem titled "What's the News?" in the Indianapolis [Indiana] Journal (February 16, 1900): O what is the news from Dekel's drift, / Or the news from Slingersfontein? / Is Honey Nest kloof still on the lift, / Or Koodoosberg in line? / Is Majesndie or Jacobsdal / ...


1

A measure with support from all parties is often called “nonpartisan.” For example, “We’re in political gridlock on partisan issues like X and Y, but at least we can make progress in nonpartisan initiatives like preventing car crashes and pedestrian accidents.” Merriam Webster: not partisan, especially : free from party affiliation, bias, or designation


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