89 votes
Accepted

Non-vulgar alternative to “Don't care a ____”

One option for a word is whit1 : the smallest part or particle imaginable Don't care a whit2 is even an idiomatic phrase: didn't care at all. Sally thought Joe liked her, but he didn't care ...
Catija's user avatar
  • 3,547
83 votes
Accepted

Word for "lose something temporarily"

Consider either misplace or mislay; both have similar meanings: Misplace to put (something) in the wrong place; to lose (something) for a short time by forgetting where you put it Mislay to ...
vpn's user avatar
  • 2,192
79 votes
Accepted

diurnal is to day as "..." is to morning

matutinal adjective [formal] happening in the morning: We chatted over our matutinal coffee. [Cambridge Dictionary] Though normal people have morning coffee.
Edwin Ashworth's user avatar
70 votes

Non-vulgar alternative to “Don't care a ____”

How about 'don't care a bit' it rhymes with your sh... word. Here's a link to 'not a bit'; 'I don't care a bit' is also idiomatic. https://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/not+one+bit
Jelila's user avatar
  • 5,552
68 votes

Is the word 'Hitherto' outdated?

Merriam-Webster Unabridged does not flag hitherto as "archaic." Macmillan does mark hitherto as "very formal" but it's by no means outdated. Whoever marked you down for using an "archaic" word is ...
Gnawme's user avatar
  • 40.8k
62 votes

What was “Herbal Tea” called before ‘tea’ was introduced in Europe?

So, my question: How did they call these herbal infusions? During the Middle English period, the concoction made from the herb was itself referred to as an herb. They would say "Drink this herb". ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 20.4k
62 votes
Accepted

What is the original connection between "nurse" and "sister"?

Yes, nursing as a career has religious origins and, until fairly recently, nurses were generally nuns - sisters. Take a look at the history of nursing on Wikipedia: From the earliest times most ...
Bekahland's user avatar
  • 1,179
59 votes
Accepted

What was “Herbal Tea” called before ‘tea’ was introduced in Europe?

Tisane. an infusion (as of dried herbs) used as a beverage or for medicinal effects Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin ptisana, from Greek ptisanē, literally, crushed barley, from ptissein ...
Chris's user avatar
  • 1,506
59 votes
Accepted

Synonym for "increase by one" for use in technical publication

Increment, according to Merriam Webster: the action or process of increasing especially in quantity or value In programming this is often used to add one, for example in a loop. In your shoe ...
JJJ's user avatar
  • 7,148
59 votes
Accepted

Is there a single word meaning "the thing that attracts me"?

The allure for me at this restaurant is their sumptuous ravioli. allure TFD n. The power to attract; enticement.
lbf's user avatar
  • 30.4k
56 votes

Is there a non-combative term for the word "enemy"?

If you referred to the various groups as adversaries, you would imply nothing of the unity or justice of their causes; simply that their aims were opposed to your own, in a particular contest, ...
Robin Betts's user avatar
  • 1,159
54 votes

What is a less controversial name for the clothing item known as a "wife-beater" in the United States?

I've always heard them referred to as tank tops, or tanks. Wife-beater may be regional slang; I never heard the term used while growing up in California.
Gnawme's user avatar
  • 40.8k
51 votes

Is there a non-combative term for the word "enemy"?

I would say, "opponent" as it sounds less combative. a person who is on an opposing side in a game, contest, controversy, or the like; adversary. [Dictionary.com]
Jade's user avatar
  • 499
50 votes

Is there a single word meaning "the thing that attracts me"?

The appeal maybe? "To me, the appeal of this restaurant is their sumptuous ravioli." From Cambridge Dictionary: "the quality in someone or something that makes him, her, or it attractive or ...
Erwan's user avatar
  • 617
50 votes
Accepted

On a scale from Optimist to Pessimist, what would be exactly in the middle?

Perhaps this is the word you're looking for: The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails. {William Arthur Ward} Collins defines realist ...
user405662's user avatar
  • 8,260
48 votes

What is a less controversial name for the clothing item known as a "wife-beater" in the United States?

I've always referred (and heard and read others referring) to them as A-shirts (as opposed to T-shirts). They're sold as A-shirts, too.
Gordon's user avatar
  • 587
48 votes
Accepted

Better alternatives to "Save me!" - meaning to save electricity

I suppose conserve would be a more correct (or at least less ambiguous) term for what's meant. But as I said in the comment, "Save me!" is a bit funnier and draws your attention as it personifies the ...
komodosp's user avatar
  • 1,351
46 votes
Accepted

What is a less controversial name for the clothing item known as a "wife-beater" in the United States?

The shirt in the OP is not the best example of what people, at least originally, meant by "wifebeater". Instead, "wifebeater" meant a finely ribbed, thin fabric, white, A-shirt, sold in multipacks ...
DavePhD's user avatar
  • 10.6k
46 votes

Is there a non-combative term for the word "enemy"?

It's not a single word, but it is very neutral. You could just call them the other side. Collins definition nr 14 for side says: COUNTABLE NOUN B2 The different sides in a war, argument, or ...
fev's user avatar
  • 33k
44 votes
Accepted

Word that sounds like "metal" but means "grit", "tenacity", and "perseverance"

Mettle Defined by Oxford Dictionaries as: a person's ability to cope well with difficulties; spirit and resilience. It is commonly seen in the phrase: (put someone) on their mettle meaning, (of a ...
marcellothearcane's user avatar
43 votes

Word for dress-like garment with shorts instead of skirt?

The one-piece garment with shorts is sometimes referred to as a "romper", as shown here - from a recent online catalog in the US: Thanks to @RaceYouAnytime's generosity, here are some ...
Kristina Lopez's user avatar
43 votes
Accepted

Singular word for gravel?

A piece of gravel would indeed be a 'piece of gravel'. The reason for this is that your other suggestions rule themselves out for various reasons, the primary of these being that not all gravels are ...
Spagirl's user avatar
  • 11.7k
42 votes

Non-vulgar alternative to “Don't care a ____”

A traditional expression for this is don't give/care a fig. Cambridge Dictionaries says it's old-fashioned, but I think the meaning should still be clear in context even for folks who haven't heard it....
1006a's user avatar
  • 22.8k
42 votes
Accepted

What are names for a gold digger's man?

A gold digger's man must be a goldmine. Gold digging, engaging in romantic relationships for money rather than love Gold mining, mining for the element gold Wikipedia Girl's got a goldmine and he's ...
Nigel J's user avatar
  • 24.4k
41 votes
Accepted

What is a less offensive term for "Christian mythology" that still implies it's non-empirical?

“Faith-based beliefs/belief systems” is used and contrasted with “science/evidence-based beliefs/belief systems” in the linked ‘Science 2.0’ article: Belief systems are the stories we tell ...
Papa Poule's user avatar
  • 9,697
41 votes
Accepted

Truefully vs Truthfully -- interchangeable?

The OED says trueful is rare; it says truefully is obsolete. The first, the OED notes, was formed in English (c. 1325) from "true" (meaning faithful in the sense in which we use it today with ...
Xanne's user avatar
  • 14.6k
41 votes
Accepted

What is a word like "negate" but even worse?

I think outweigh conveys the right meaning here To be more significant than; exceed in value or importance e.g. "The benefits outweigh the risks." The sentence in the question would be I ...
cigien's user avatar
  • 4,517
40 votes

What are names for a gold digger's man?

Sugar Daddy Not strictly one word - but a common term for a older, richer counterpart of a gold digger. Usually used for more willing participants - older men who are just glad to be dating someone ...
Chromane's user avatar
  • 1,571

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible