13

I think "complacent" may be a close answer. adj. having or showing a lack of interest or concern Source: Merriam-Webster (A correct answer would be based on how you describe this person. Does he/she know enough of the subject to not investigate or is the subject of discussion too bland for the person's taste so as to not arouse any interest? If ...


13

I would most likely use the word vapid. M-W gives: "lacking flavor, zest, interest, animation, or spirit : FLAT, DULL" I find that in contemporary American use, the word (when a applied to a person) suggests that the person doesn't think too hard about anything.


11

I would describe such a person as dull. When used to describe a person it can have the following meanings: [...] 4. Intellectually weak or obtuse; stupid. 5. Lacking responsiveness or alertness; insensitive: half-asleep and dull to the noises in the next room. 6. Dispirited; depressed: a dull mood. [...] (these are from the American Heritage Dictionary). ...


10

The term "philistine" applies to culture in general, which is not quite "intellectuality", as this latter substantive "intersects" with it. (SOED) culture […] 6. A particular form, stage, or type of intellectual development or civilization in a society. (OED) philistine adj. […] 2. Uneducated, unenlightened; indifferent or ...


9

Maybe "apathetic" - having or showing little or no interest, concern, or emotion (From Merriam-Webster.) Technically this is an opposite word, but it's somewhat diverged from being just the opposite of pathos.


4

Without knowing more details about why the person might be "not intellectual curious", it's difficult to know what aspect to focus on. There are various 'not curious' and 'not intellectual' answers already given, as well as various 'not caring' situations. But there's also the case where they're not simply apathetic but are actively hostile to ...


2

The adjective dilatory carries, according to Webster's, a negative emphasis: dilatory: [a] inclined to defer or put off what ought to be done at once; given to procrastination; delaying; procrastinating; loitering a dilatory servant [b] marked by procrastination or delay; tardy; slow; sluggish ... said of actions or measures [re-formatted and with minor ...


2

What about "Neanderthal?" or "troglodyte?" both words conjure the unthinking, prehistoric human.


1

Since you've mentioned that you'd prefer a verb, slack seems to fit the bill nicely. To be careless or remiss in doing. slack one's duty. [American Heritage Dictionary]


1

First, although you do not say what you want these words for (adjectives to describe the tags for your "How to Play" instructions? As the names of the 2 kinds of tags?) I assume you mean the latter since you have pretty clearly already described your tags without finding those elusive words. Second, I don't think the names for your 2 kinds of tags ...


1

It can be context dependant. Imports and exports are words that have the specific distinction incoming and outgoing, however they refer to things transported to/from another country. In an airport or train station, Arrivals and Departures have the distinction. But in the context of say, a company with freight, Deliveries or Arrivals would usually refer to ...


1

I don't know of any word or phrase other than "meet your heroes". And it's usually prefaced with "Never". And there's a good reason. The world is full of stories about people who met their heroes, and were disappointed. https://thoughtcatalog.com/justin-hook/2012/09/12-reasons-you-should-never-meet-your-hero/ https://www.suggest.com/...


1

How about sequacious? Highly impressionable or unquestioning, especially in following a leader or embracing an idea: False philosophers ... have beclouded educated but sequacious minds. [American Heritage Dictionary] Lexico gives (of a person) lacking independence or originality of thought. If you read anything without questioning it, then you are just ...


1

Several reference works have attempted to draw distinctions between need and necessity since Fleisher did so in 1804. From George Crabb, English Synonymes Explained, in Alphabetical Order (1816): Necessity respects the thing wanted; need the person wanting. There would be no necessity for punishments, if there were not evil doers ; he is peculiarly ...


1

For the sake of posterity, even though this question is over 4 years old, I'm just gonna add the terms that the people at my church use and tell their children. "Face of death" or "FOD" Referring to the natural resting face when the subject is not intending to emote Ex: "Don't mind her. She's not mad; she just has an FOD." &...


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