18

Looking at the image there's nothing "beautiful" about the woman's mammary glands. The colloquial term "tits" is vulgar, so use the formal, inoffensive, "breasts". The image alone will be enough to offend any who are straitlaced. She had large sagging breasts. (uncomplimentary) She had large breasts (positive neutral meaning) ...


13

The words that you would use must express as closely as possible the intended meaning of the original. So, perhaps, in case you have not done this already, it makes sense to write down the story in Spanish, and think through, very carefully, what meaning each word and phrase need to convey. If you use, in Spanish, 'grandes tetas', it may make sense to say '...


5

The way you draw it, I'd call them grotesquely large breasts. Otherwise, pointed and pendulous. I imagine you will offend many women with the image - there's little you can do about it except change your image. Consider a male beast with a penis that touches the ground - it would offend a lot of people.


3

This is a very difficult post to answer. You want to avoid offending ANYONE? Why? What is the purpose and intended audience of your writing? This matters. Offense is a personal thing, though one dictated in part by social mores. And of course nowadays "offense" can morph into outrage and cancellation very easily. So that could be your worry? Still, ...


3

If we are going to just discuss the concept of "large breasts" without trying to offend, without considering the picture that shows what happens to large breasts over time, you might consider the term buxom to describe the woman. It has a few meanings, among them "healthy" and "vivacious" (full of energy), but in common usage, ...


2

It looks like administrative division is one term that matches your needs. The US and Canada are divided into administrative divisions called states and provinces, respectively. From wikipedia: An administrative division, unit, entity, area or region, also referred to as a subnational entity, constituent unit, or country subdivision, is a portion of a ...


2

There is a definition of "hyponymy" in Wikipedia. In linguistics, a hyponym (from Greek hupó, "under" and ónoma, "name") is a word or phrase whose semantic field is included within that of another word, its hyperonym or hypernym (from Greek hupér, "over" and ónoma, "name"). In simpler terms, a hyponym is in ...


2

The verb to abstract is used in English in the way that the OP describes. Even though this way of using is likely to be found only in the contexts of theoretical nature, it is listed in the widely available, general-purpose dictionaries, such as Lexico abstract something from Consider something theoretically or separately from (something else) ‘to abstract ...


2

There is not a single word to my knowledge. The usual phrase for these is Business Day. The previous Friday is the previous business day. On Friday the next Monday is the following or next business day.


2

The event is called a precedent: An earlier event or action that is regarded as an example or guide to be considered in subsequent similar circumstances. ‘I want the kind of precedent I have seen in Europe followed here.’ ‘So the planners want to look at what precedent they are setting.’ — Lexico So you could use precedent-setting, although I would ...


2

My first thought was normalized. Normalize verb bring or return to a normal or standard condition or state. "the situation had normalized" [Lexico]


2

Both words are, of course, "distant" synonyms with one another. The meaning of the word Gratitude has a very direct distinction of being used in regards to being "thankful" and is almost devoutly used to express, in one way or another, a sense of pleased "appreciation" for kindness. The literal etymological origin of the word ...


2

In the first question "is" is strictly correct, the subject (team) being in the singular. This rule is less observed than it was and may feel somewhat formal now. Only the team with the lowest service ratings is referred to training with human resources. (I'm surprised to see "human resources" used in 1972 when "personnel" was ...


1

I believe your analysis to be correct for all three. I need not repeat all the definitions in the Cambridge dictionary but through has the connotations that you suggest. Cambridge dictionary I suspect the compilers of the questions were testing for understanding of the difference between through and throughout. Throughout = in every part, or during the whole ...


1

According to Merriam-Webster, you can use wake as an intransitive verb: 1 a : to be or remain awake 'He wakes' would be antonymous to 'He sleeps' and an active version of 'He is awake'. However, I've never heard it being used this way (contrary to definitions 1b, 1c and 2), and I'm not a native speaker, so I can't really comment on how it feels.


1

If you're building a webform with a country drop-down, you can rewrite the 'state' field label to match the country field. In fact, you can rewrite the entire address entry dialogue to the country-specific format including script and writing direction. And think why you require this information. In the UK counties are not part of the postal address, neither ...


1

From this eastern side of the Atlantic there are many candidates for the name of such an administrative region but I can't identify one that fits for global definition. In Britain we have district, county or shire (rather archaic), city, region (the largest administrative division often composed of a number of counties, or a city), and we do not use state ...


1

No, they aren't interchangeable here. Neither of them work. Equivalent is an error and counterpart is being used in a nonidiomatic way, although the general sense of the word is appropriate to the sentence's objective. BoldBen's answer handles the counterpart issue. Equivalent is used when establishing a comparison, not when establishing a contrast. So you ...


1

I think the word that you're looking for is coterie. It is a small group of people with similar interests. Coterie (noun): a small group of people with shared interests, often one that does not want other people to join them. Example: a coterie of writers. [Cambridge English Dictionary]


1

Google Ngrams The examples of "prompitude" are almost exclusively from historical quotes A picture is worth a 1,000 words:


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