19

Since you are quoting from what appears to be a U.S. newspaper article, its decision to capitalize black as Black when the word is used as a racial term probably reflects Associated Press style. That style has changed within the past six months, as explained in John Daniszewski, "The decision to capitalize Black" (June 19, 2020): AP’s style is now ...


18

Although enumerate has overtones of numeric order because of its etymology, it is not so restricted in its use: enumerate = to name things separately, one by one Cambridge Similarly, Merriam Webster offers a definition that avoids any numeric content: enumerate = to specify one after another : LIST Merriam Webster Because bullet points list items ...


5

Is it correct to say: Please tell us the best choice, and why/why is that? Tell me your name, and where are you from? No. The second clause of both should be expressed as an indirect question: Please tell us the best choice, and why/why that is. Tell me your name, and where you are from. You do not need the question mark and the awkward inversion and ...


5

There is, apparently, no rule carved in stone; rather, what dictates the use of coordination by means of "and" (bar some fundamental and rather stringent requirements as regard to parallelism) is a general precept that is referred to in CGEL § 13.22, p. 930. And is a coordinator which has the most general meaning and use. The only restriction on ...


2

Welcome! The use of quotations is to substitute for the absence of the italic font. In published texts titles will be (should be) written in italics to set them apart. Few typewriters (remember those) had the luxury of assorted fonts. The answer was to surround a title with quotes. The practice continues even though today's choices of fonts extend beyond the ...


2

[American workers facing a less prosperous future than their parents’ generation] have gotten the message. No: the bracketed element is a non-finite clause functioning as subject of the sentence. It's quite common for non-finite clauses, as well as finite ones, to function as subject. Within that clause the gerund-participial clause "facing a less ...


2

There are people with far too high an opinion of their knowledge who criticize what they don't understand. That's the real explanation. Of is a preposition; probably the most common one in English. It's got thousands of special uses with special idioms (Describe the meaning of of in the phrase the apple of my eye, for instance) and having duties in ...


2

The role here is to be a shortened version of "the fact/idea that...". The fact that this can be said with such certainty reflects the number and diversity of approaches being taken. Another example: The idea that my drawing of a cat can be mistaken as a bird is proposterous. You must be joking. Which can also be said as: That my drawing of a ...


1

The answer is no, generally speaking. And the explanation is rather simple: You have two independent clauses—one imperative, one interrogative—that, when coordinated, fight for sentence-ending punctuation. To better see the problem, just reverse your example: Original: *Tell me your name, and where are you from? Reversed: *Where are you from? and tell me ...


1

To supplement the AMA's recommendations (noted in Polygnome's answer), I offer the following style guide recommendations. From The Chicago Manual of Style, sixteenth edition (2010): 12.15 Basic spacing in mathematics. Mathematics isn't simply read left to right in a machine-like manner, and one should be able to see the parts of an equation if it is ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible