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8 votes

Is this passive voice misuse?

Ignore it. This is the outcome of rule creep: gradually escalating sound syntactical advice into a senseless grammatical "rule". Level 1: Overuse of the passive can definitely be a stylistic vice (...
StoneyB on hiatus's user avatar
7 votes
Accepted

Passive voice in academic writing; why is it not recommended?

In any type of writing—academic or informal or anything in between—passive voice can be used. As was noted in the posted question, in a number of word processing programs any passive constructions are ...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
  • 164k
6 votes

Passive voice in academic writing; why is it not recommended?

@SvenYarg's answer here and particularly his fuller one on the page linked to in the OP's question are a good analysis of when the active is to be preferred to the passive, and vice versa. Just a ...
Shoe's user avatar
  • 33.1k
4 votes

Do "elision" and "ratatouille" have unmarked plural forms?

Ratatouille, at least in French, has both a singular form (ratatouille) and a plural one (ratatouilles, and only this one). The plural form is not used much, but makes sense in some context (e.g. ...
WoJ's user avatar
  • 440
4 votes

"For every variable x and y" or "For every variables x and y"?

"every" is an indefinite pronoun and takes a singular noun. e.g; Every man and woman participated in the game. So, " for every variable "x" and "y" is the correct ...
Ahmed Nadeem Faiz's user avatar
3 votes

Is this passive voice misuse?

Use of the passive in English varies with writing style and field. Some publications' style sheets discourage use of the passive voice, while others encourage it. If you are discouraged from using ...
Chris Rogers's user avatar
  • 1,036
3 votes
Accepted

An adjective for incertitude

The adjective "uncertain" fits exactly here. It is the natural adjective from "incertitude" (or rather from the much clearer and better-understood synonym "uncertainty"). ...
DJClayworth's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Possessive pronoun + gerund confusion

The sentence in question I can't prevent your being offended. is certainly grammatical, and, as @Billj points out, it's grammatical whether or not the subject of being offended is you or your. So ...
John Lawler's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Passive voice misuse for technical documentation

There is nothing wrong with passive voice, and at times it can be very useful. It is often much easier to understand technical writing if you start sentences with old information or concepts, and ...
Peter Shor 's user avatar
2 votes

Term for a piece of legacy software that is buggy but too much trouble to replace so you have to live with it?

Brittle is the word. I have had people present me such programs as the wonderful, if old, solution or the current crisis. It all depends on what they were doing then and how they hope to keep doing it....
Elliot's user avatar
  • 5,384
2 votes
Accepted

Is assistancy a word? If not, what's a better alternative?

If you wish to avoid a useful word because it is not widely defined, you could use a related alternative: Collins assistantship: in British English NOUN US education: a graduate post which requires ...
Anton's user avatar
  • 28.7k
1 vote

"For every variable x and y" or "For every variables x and y"?

There is a way to use the plural but it uses the word 'all' instead of 'every' giving the phrase "... for all variables x and y ...". If Grammarly genuinely suggests "... for every ...
BoldBen's user avatar
  • 17.2k
1 vote

Do "elision" and "ratatouille" have unmarked plural forms?

I googled (in quotes) "many elision" and found nothing other than a typo: https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=...
Fattie's user avatar
  • 10.6k
1 vote

Term for a piece of legacy software that is buggy but too much trouble to replace so you have to live with it?

At our office, we call it flip phone software, as in anybody with a flip phone must be using old stuff. But also is a nice way of saying that the software is old rather than calling it Legacy or ...
Kevin B Leigh's user avatar
1 vote

Passive voice in academic writing; why is it not recommended?

Regarding the Active and Passive Voice styles, apart from a stubborn stand of any 'proofreading tool', the advice of William Strunk and E.B White is apt and moderate. (The Elements of Style, Chapter ...
mahmud k pukayoor's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

how do I transform "that can be used" into active voice?

I second other comments that the passive voice is not inappropriate. However, if you'd like to convert this to the active voice, write: You can use SuperAPI to configure a Higher-Order model." I'...
Aleksandr Hovhannisyan's user avatar
1 vote

Word that means "intentional bug"

Features that are not based on functional requirements, but are intended to provide entertainment and/or amusement, are called Easter eggs.  Security-related bugs installed for malicious purposes are ...
Scott - Слава Україні's user avatar
1 vote

Word that means "intentional bug"

I believe it's called "Quirk". This was widely used in HTML (Quirks Mode) to maintain backwards compatibility with some old web pages:
romaninsh's user avatar
  • 454

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