1 vote
Accepted

What "On your approach" means in this context?

The game is using aviation terminology. An "approach" is the phase of the flight where you are "approaching" something - usually an airport if you are a normal plane, a target if ...
DJClayworth's user avatar
  • 25.9k
1 vote
Accepted

What's the etymology of "noddle"? And is "noodle" a derivative?

Nobody knows. The OED says "noddle" is "of uncertain origin"; it dates back to around 1425. It suggests there might be a relation to "nod" (around 1390, origin unknown ...
Stuart F's user avatar
  • 9,665
1 vote

When did "light (something) up" begin to mean shooting?

J.E. Lighter, The Random House Historical Dictionary of American Slang (1997) has the following relevant entries for "light up": light up v. ... 2.a. to fire a gun. 1953–55 Fine Delinquents ...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
  • 163k
1 vote

When did "light (something) up" begin to mean shooting?

The first citation in print with the meaning "to shoot, destroy with gunfire" is from 1967, in Puerto Rican writer Piri Thomas's Down These Mean Streets: You’d smack him down like Whiplash ...
Stuart F's user avatar
  • 9,665
1 vote

Slang term for 'black-market food' during WW2

Several historical articles on US rationing during WWII have mentioned "meatlegging", a portmanteau of 'meat' and 'bootlegging', as a term in common use; reportedly almost 20% of US meat ...
arp's user avatar
  • 2,709

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