105

Here is the rest of the quote in a letter by Van Gogh: So it doesn't seem impossible to me that cholera, gravel, pleurisy & cancer are the means of celestial locomotion, just as steam-boats, omnibuses and railways are the terrestrial means. To die quietly of old age would be to go there on foot. Basically, Van Gogh is saying that it's very possible ...


6

Pakistani here. The usual phrase is "strong background", but can be used as: His background is strong. It's used fairly commonly across the border here in Pakistan as well. He didn't use the exact phrase in the audio, though but that's what he meant. "Strong background", when applied to a person, means that they either wield influence, belong to an ...


4

In context it clearly refers to the organs of speech (mouth, tongue, lungs etc), and reflects the prejudice of the time that anything associated with females was fundamentally weak and delicate. It seems here to be referring to the acoustic power of the sounds, but similar remarks were often made about the inappropriateness of women speaking words that ...


3

10 feet long = ten feet in length 10 feet high = ten feet in height 10 feet wide = ten feet in width 10 feet deep = ten feet in depth 10 inches thick = 10 inches in thickness a million strong = a million in strength And the "strength" of a group is normally expressed in how many individuals it contains. An army 10,000 strong marched on the city. ...


3

"rather affected" - somewhat pretentious or fake "my literary parents" - well-educated, but probably snobbish, parents "christened" - given a Christian name, old-fashioned way of saying given a name "never...all the use" - the negative never lets us know that the name is not used Translated to more modern English it might read: "My smarty-pants parents ...


3

In this sentence, "step back" is the third of three actions listed - the first being "block investment" and the second being "police it rigorously". In the final context of this sentence, it means that regulators, or whoever is controlling this investment, will "step back" from the controls it is placing in the other two actions listed in the sentence. ...


3

'How come' and 'why' basically have the same meaning, and mainly differ in their use in set phrases and quotes. The nuance is the same for both however, but 'how come' is slightly more informal How come John isn't coming Why isn't John coming? Same nuance for both 'How is it that' is often used when expressing frustration at something E.g. How is it that ...


3

Both are asking about the placement of something, but you will get a different kind of response from either. What is it near? For example, if you are asking where a grocery story is located, people will answer the above question with other building or big landmarks that are close by: "It's by the bank" "It's next to the big park with the swings" "It's ...


3

I believe the teacher is incorrect. There are possibly two interpretations of what the author is speaking of: they had a friend who had several phone numbers, one of which they lost they have several friends, and lost the phone number for one of them The clue to the correct interpretation is that phone number is singular rather than plural, indicating ...


3

I found no idioms or phrases that could possibly explain the phrase. So, I'm going to assume that touch the bottle again means to intoxicate them one last time before leaving. I draw this inference due to the fact that there is the usage of again in the sentence. So, touching the bottle might essentially be a way of how the character Whitey tells others to ...


3

It is fine. At the point the storm broke out, it “had been” (past sense) sunny. Thus, the sunny and storm did not occur at the same time. It is the past perfect continuous tense. https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/english-grammar-reference/past-perfect


3

There is a sense in which it is countable. If I say Fire damage has made occupancy of the building impossible., that is NOT countable. However, if I describe the period during which one person occupies the building as an occupancy, and each subsequent instance an occupancy. Then each of those "occupancies" can be counted.


2

This sentence can be broken into two sentences, ""In Britain the price of a new drug for cystic fibrosis has provoked fury" and "The government's refusal to pay it[the price] has also provoked fury". "As has" helps join the two sentences by having "has" refer to "provoked" and create one concise sentence.


2

"... but the risk of escalation has not been so high since their most recent, full-blown war in 1971 ." The inversion of the verb is intended to put "so high" at the end of the sentence to signal that it is the point of the message.


2

For this purpose, a close enough definition is in special circumstances. It is saying that a manufacturer can only use a listed substance if given an exception from the rule. And exceptions would only be given in special circumstances. The opposite is “on a routine basis” which means something that is done often and without special circumstances. An ...


2

"Of each sort" means there are probably different kinds or types of a thing and one is referring to each of that type. So, "Twenty of each sort" means 20 of each kind of that product. For example, if there are 4 types of bottles, lets say blue, green, red and yellow, then twenty bottles of each. (20 blue, 20 green, 20 red and 20 yellow)


2

"wise" in this sentence means "advisable", and "ever" is being used to reinforce a negative meaning: It would never be wise to give too much importance to the claps of an audience. Therefore, the sentence: The claps of an audience will matter to you more than would ever be wise. means that the person will care too much about the approval of the audience, ...


2

The sentence means, roughly, that there are obligations incumbent on someone who aspires to the status of gentleman (or higher). Cf. noblesse oblige. Noblesse oblige (/noʊˌblɛs əˈbliːʒ/; French: [nɔblɛs ɔbliʒ]) is a French expression used in English. It translates as "nobility obliges" and denotes the concept that nobility extends beyond mere ...


2

When in doubt about pronoun elements, a quick test is to refer to the nearest preceding noun or noun phrase that could agree with it in number or function. By that test, use this: What is any Nation, after all — and what is a human being; — but a struggle between conflicting, paradoxical, opposing elements — and they themselves and their most violent ...


2

"I'd hate for anything to come between us" is grammatically correct and uses an idiom in its figurative sense: come between (someone and someone else). TFD Lit. to be in between two people. Fig. to interfere in someone else's romance; to break up a pair of lovers.


2

The message has several grammatical mistakes, and the sentence you quote is not grammatically correct. "confirm" is a verb, but is being used here as a noun. Therefore we cannot tell you definitely what the sentence means. From context it seems reasonable that they are asking to confirm your shipping address, though this is something you probably guessed ...


2

It seems unlikely that Swedenborg meant literally a cloud of water vapour; but whether he was thinking of a physical cloud, something real but insubstantial, or something metaphorical, I don't think it's possible to tell from that extract. He uses a thunderstorm literally, because it is within a simile: "like a (real, material) thunderstorm clear[ing] the (...


2

It is difficult to construct a sentence such as this that makes sense without context. Your re-phrase, for example, could be interpreted as meaning that there was a sunny week at some point, not necessarily the week immediately preceding, before the storm broke out. Groucho says: I was on safari. And one night I shot an elephant in my pajamas. How he ...


1

In that context appreciate means to: understand (a situation) fully; grasp the full implications of


1

You are correct that saying that or asking whether someone "used to" do something implies that the action took place in the past and does not still continue. If you asked me, "Did you used to work with XYZ?" and I still did, my response would say as much: "Yes, and I still do." If you want to ask without that implication, use present perfect tense: "Have ...


1

1) Yes, the Cambridge definition you have cited fits this usage perfectly. The idea is that the "early successes" of the digital-first approach will serve as a foundation for further success, as the approach is refined and extended. Beyond "further success," we can't really say what is being built; the metaphor involved here is rather weak. 2) The ...


1

Live no more implies die. Whereas it's true that a person would die without air, the point of your sentence is that mankind depends on air as much as fish do on water, so no more belongs before the phrase live without air.


1

"Could you have been dreaming?" -- Seeing there are several potential scenarios, I will create one and go with it for an answer. A person describes an event and the listener asks the question above. The meaning of the question could be that the person asking is skeptically exploring that the event is too unusual, unreasonable or even expected. For instance, ...


1

Dreaming = imagining. So the question asks if you imagined something (depends on the context).


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